Facebook type too small.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by geopelia, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    How do I change the size of type in Windows 7 please for Facebook?
    I've found "Appearance and Personalization" and "Adjust Screen Resolution",
    which worked for a while, but Facebook went back to almost unreadable very
    small type. Email and Google stayed as I wanted them.
    I want Medium or largest.

    XP used to have a way to adjust the size down on the right by the clock.

    Is there anything I can do which only affects Facebook please?
    The computer man can get into the computer remotely, if it's too complicated
    for me to try.
    Thank you.
    Geopelia
     
    geopelia, Mar 7, 2014
    #1
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  2. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message


    The size of your Facebook type is nothing to do with the Windows
    version. It is a function of your browser.

    In most browsers hit "CTRL +" to make view bigger, and 'CTRL - ' to
    make it smaller.

    CTRL is the key probably bottom-left (and also maybe right) of your
    keyboard.

    geoff

    Thank you, that worked. I didn't think it would be so simple.

    Geopelia
     
    geopelia, Mar 7, 2014
    #2
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  3. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    The only problem with that is it not being permanent - you have to do
    it every time you use the web browser, which may not be a problem if
    it's only one or two websites that need altering for use.

    In some web browers there is a preference option to permanently use a
    bigger text size, but not all websites will use it, especially those
    using Flash for everything.

    Another more permanent option is to change the computer's display
    resolution, but that means you fit less on-screen, and on the
    now-everyehere LCD displays things can look blurry at the "wrong"
    resolution.
     
    Your Name, Mar 7, 2014
    #3
  4. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "Your Name" wrote in message

    The only problem with that is it not being permanent - you have to do
    it every time you use the web browser, which may not be a problem if
    it's only one or two websites that need altering for use.

    In some web browers there is a preference option to permanently use a
    bigger text size, but not all websites will use it, especially those
    using Flash for everything.

    Another more permanent option is to change the computer's display
    resolution, but that means you fit less on-screen, and on the
    now-everyehere LCD displays things can look blurry at the "wrong"
    resolution.

    ................

    I've got the resolution changed, at first it worked for everything, then
    Facebook went back to a very small size, which is why I asked here.
    I don't worry about using Ctrl + every time if necessary, plenty of time
    these days.
    I had trouble finding - on the keyboard, but discovered it is the same - as
    for hyphens. Computers never cease to amaze me!
    The - on the calculator didn't work. This keyboard has a calculator, but
    I've never used it. I prefer to trust my own arithmetic.
    (A bird jumping around on the keyboard can make some interesting typos.)
     
    geopelia, Mar 7, 2014
    #4
  5. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    There are a couple of keyboard models that do have in-built
    calculators, but it's more likely that you've just got a standard
    keyboard with a numberpad on the right-hand side - there's no actual
    calculator or screen part to it.

    The numberpad is useful if you are entering lots of numbers into a
    spreadsheet (for example). It will also usually work with the Windows
    or Mac OS Calculator application on the computer so you don't have to
    use the mouse to click the on-screen buttons.

    Sometimes to get the numberpad to function you have to turn on the "Num
    Lock", but exactly how you do that varies a little from keyboard to
    keybaord, and from Mac to Windows ... usually it's simply means
    pressing the key labelled "Num Lock" and an indicator (similar to the
    Caps Lock light) lights up on the keyboard to show it's now "on".
     
    Your Name, Mar 8, 2014
    #5
  6. geopelia

    Gordon Guest

    It is somewhat rude to refer to a person as s/he when they are
    present.
     
    Gordon, Mar 9, 2014
    #6
  7. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    You can't tell if they're present or not ... only that they were here
    when they push the "post" button. ;-)
     
    Your Name, Mar 9, 2014
    #7
  8. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message

    Grow a chin.

    geoff
    .........................

    I sometimes have my doubts. But if my chin grew a beard it might prove
    something.

    Just for the record, I'm female, aged 84. That's why I have to ask stuff
    that you folks might think everybody knows.
    Computers weren't around when I went to school, 1935 -1947. Nor were
    electronic calculators, though we did have logs and slide rules.
    The keyboard is Logitech. I think the calculator is real. It has Num lock, +
    and -, but not multiply and divide.
    I've never used it.

    Geopelia
     
    geopelia, Mar 9, 2014
    #8
  9. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    Logitech is one company that dooes make a keyboard with an in-built
    calculator. If there is a small calculator-style LCD screen on the
    keyboard above the numbers for displaying the numbers / results, then
    it is a proper in-built calculator.

    If there is no LCD screen, then what you have is just a standard
    "extended" keyboard with a numberpad which can be used for entering
    lots of numerical data into the computer more quickly and can be used
    with the Windows / Mac calculator application instead of clicking the
    on-screen buttons with the mouse.

    It does have multiply (the "*" key) and divide (the "/" key).
     
    Your Name, Mar 9, 2014
    #9
  10. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "Your Name" wrote in message

    Logitech is one company that dooes make a keyboard with an in-built
    calculator. If there is a small calculator-style LCD screen on the
    keyboard above the numbers for displaying the numbers / results, then
    it is a proper in-built calculator.

    If there is no LCD screen, then what you have is just a standard
    "extended" keyboard with a numberpad which can be used for entering
    lots of numerical data into the computer more quickly and can be used
    with the Windows / Mac calculator application instead of clicking the
    on-screen buttons with the mouse.
    It does have multiply (the "*" key) and divide (the "/" key).
    .................

    There is no screen on the keyboard.
    So that is what * and / are for!
    Thanks.
    You would think they would use the signs everybody knows.
    But we learnt long division, multiplication, percentages and square roots in
    school in my day.
    And all the mental arithmetic short cuts.
    We didn't do trigonometry, but the army taught us what we needed to know of
    that.
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #10
  11. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message

    Geo, I was replying to Gordon who has a problem, it seems, with the
    words "he" or "she" ;-)

    .... I suspect we all do, these days!


    I think you may referring not to a calculator, but to the a numeric
    keypad, with is simply a separate part of the most keyboards that has,
    um, numeric keys in the traditional layout. Usually does have multiply
    (*) and divide (/) though, as well as Numerical Lock, Delete and Enter
    keys. Some keyboards omit this section.

    But this does not do calculations - it simply enters those keystrokes
    into a calculator application. Or any other sort of application.

    geoff

    ..... I don't use it. I don't like calculators.
    You have to do the sum yourself anyway to check if the machine has got it
    right.
    You can't always see if an answer is ridiculous.
    And adding a column of figures yourself is quicker than entering them all
    into a calculator.
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #11
  12. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    Using an "x" for multiplication would be too easily confused with the
    letter "x".

    The "/" for divison makes a bit more sense since that is what is often
    used in fractions, e.g. "3/4", which can be read as "three out of four"
    and means "three divided by four". (Technically the slash is incorrect
    and fractions should use a horizontal line with the two numbers stacked
    above and below it.)

    The "*" and "/" are used mathematically in pretty much all
    spreadsheets, computer programming languages, etc. You can even type
    something like "5*3" into Google's search webpage and it will return
    the answer 15. (You can also use Google to do more complicated
    mathematics and conversions.)

    The way schools are trying to force parents to buy even primary school
    their kids tablets and laptops these days, it won't be a surprise if
    almost nobody knows how to do simple mathematics without electronic
    gadgetry in the near future. :-(
     
    Your Name, Mar 10, 2014
    #12
  13. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "Your Name" wrote in message

    Using an "x" for multiplication would be too easily confused with the
    letter "x".

    The "/" for divison makes a bit more sense since that is what is often
    used in fractions, e.g. "3/4", which can be read as "three out of four"
    and means "three divided by four". (Technically the slash is incorrect
    and fractions should use a horizontal line with the two numbers stacked
    above and below it.)

    The "*" and "/" are used mathematically in pretty much all
    spreadsheets, computer programming languages, etc. You can even type
    something like "5*3" into Google's search webpage and it will return
    the answer 15. (You can also use Google to do more complicated
    mathematics and conversions.)

    The way schools are trying to force parents to buy even primary school
    their kids tablets and laptops these days, it won't be a surprise if
    almost nobody knows how to do simple mathematics without electronic
    gadgetry in the near future. :-(

    .............

    I've seen a girl in a shop write down 1.99 four times and add it up!

    But those kids won't have the problems I have trying to use a computer.
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #13
  14. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message

    Um, no !!!

    A common thing many people do is to work out the GST content of a gross
    price. The equation is the price, times three, divided by twenty-three.

    Bet I do do ten of those with Windows Calculator before you could do one !

    geoff

    You probably could, but why bother?
    I know you add on 15%. I've never tried to work it out from the selling
    price.
    I never heard of that way.
    I'd take off 10% plus half of that. Probably not accurate, but near enough.

    For everyday purposes, near enough is good enough. Well I think so!
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #14
  15. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message

    Well NOW everybody does !

    ;-)

    geoff

    I didn't know. I expect there are plenty of older people who never heard of
    these new signs.
    I got School Cert in 1946. That is all the maths I have needed up to now.
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #15
  16. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    Except if you do it that way you'd be completely wrong.

    (Price x 3) / 23 only gives 13%. not the proper 15% GST
     
    Your Name, Mar 10, 2014
    #16
  17. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    Opps! Sorry, you are right. You're working "backwards" to get the GST
    component from the retail price.
     
    Your Name, Mar 10, 2014
    #17
  18. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    Nope, because that's not how you write fractions - that's how they are
    typed on a computer (when not using the proper fraction symbols
    available in some fonts).

    A proper fraction is a vertical stack with a horizontal line, looking
    something like this:

    3
    -
    4
     
    Your Name, Mar 10, 2014
    #18
  19. geopelia

    Your Name Guest

    No normal person bothers to work out what the GST component of the
    price is since, unless it's a business purchase, they can't claim it
    back anyway. The exception might be those shops that have "GST Free"
    sales, but even then few people bother to work it out and just buy
    something they don't really need because it's "cheaper".
     
    Your Name, Mar 10, 2014
    #19
  20. geopelia

    geopelia Guest

    "geoff" wrote in message


    So fractions weren't written as (eg) " 3/4 " back then ?

    geoff

    No. Like 3_ I've tried all sorts of things but can't get _ between the
    figures. You can see what I mean, I hope.
    4



    4
     
    geopelia, Mar 10, 2014
    #20
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