Epson color controls, photo enhance, ICM - which one for accurate photo printing?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Lindyhop, Jul 2, 2004.

  1. Lindyhop

    Lindyhop Guest

    I printed a digital photo on an Epson Stylus Photo 820 printer and the color balance was noticeably off. There are a number of color balancing options in the print driver, i.e. Photo Enhance, ICM, Color Controls (with gamma choices), and I wonder how to determine which one will give me the most accurate results (without having to print the same photo using every possible setting <g>)? The "Photo Enhance" option seems to do additional image processing, such as noise removal and sharpening, which I don't want since I've already adjusted the images. The ICM option is a simple On/Off choice, while the Color Controls offer a multitude of adjustments. I've already made gamma and temperature adjustments on the monitor with good results. Thanks!
     
    Lindyhop, Jul 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. Lindyhop

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Lindyhop"
    If your monitor is already calibrated and you're printing from a decent
    graphics program then use ICM. The other "controls" are for tweaking with the
    image if you don't have a calibrated monitor or if you don't have a graphics
    program.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Jul 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Lindyhop

    Lindyhop Guest

    Thanks for the quick reply. When I select ICM does that refer to the Epson printer profile, i.e. EE163_1? (couldn't find out anything about this on the Epson website).
     
    Lindyhop, Jul 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Lindyhop

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Lindyhop"
    The ICM flow means there's a .icm file that describes how to translate the
    numbers in the image file into numbers (colors) that will appear on the print,
    or at least as close as is possible since the printer will always have fewer
    colors than the screen (ie, smaller gamut) and lower brightness.

    Many of the good Epson Photo printers give you the ICM file for each paper
    type, which allows you to 'soft-proof' in Photoshop by dumbing down the monitor
    view to (hopefully) show the reduced gamut and brightness of the print. If you
    have Photoshop V6 or later I can tell you how to do this.

    The printer you have has bundled all these profiles into one ICM file (your
    EE163_1.icm or .icc) so you can't soft proof them separately. What happens is
    that when you select the paper type to match what you're printing on the Epson
    driver will pick the right ICM file for that paper.

    This works pretty well if your monitor is well calibrated and if the colors are
    in gamut, and works poorly if the monitor is not properly calibrated.

    Here's some background if you're interested in CM basics ...
    http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Jul 2, 2004
    #4
  5. Lindyhop

    Lindyhop Guest

    Thanks!
     
    Lindyhop, Jul 2, 2004
    #5
  6. Lindyhop

    Ray Paseur Guest

    My personal experience: Using Paint Shop Pro 7, I was never able to get the
    colors "just right" on the Epson 1280, and I tried EVERYTHING <g>.

    When I print using Photoshop Elements, I simply set the 1280 to "No Color
    Adjustment" and the results are perfect.

    Thanks!
     
    Ray Paseur, Jul 3, 2004
    #6
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