Electrical Surge to my Laptop! Need new Logic Board?!? for $800?!?!?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by btrix, May 27, 2004.

  1. btrix

    btrix Guest

    Hello:

    My laptop was hooked up to a surge protector, but somehow, through the
    USB cord, the laptop seems to have gotten fried! We were hooking the
    USB cord from the laptop to the cable modem and a big spark and poof!

    It worked for a day on battery power, but now it won't turn on thru
    the battery or directly thru the A/C adapter.

    Compusa told me that the adapter is working fine, but I need to
    replace the "Logic Board" (part # 152600-001) and that it would cost
    me about $800!

    Any help from anyone would be so darned appreciated!

     
    btrix, May 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Seems pretty damn fishy to me that it worked on battery power afterwards
    but needs an $800 "logic board" now to run. If you can find another AC
    adapter to try out or another battery with a good charge for the laptop
    just to test with, it'd be worth a shot. But for $800 I'd be thinking of
    a whole new laptop. The most similar case I'm familiar with was when the
    internal plug for the AC adapter got knackered in a fall and wouldn't
    let the charger charge the battery anymore or work directly off the
    adapter. A lot of taking the laptop apart and putting back together and
    about a spoonful of epoxy fixed the problem.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, May 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. btrix

    Guest Guest

    OK, so you have fried the bespoke switch mode
    charger/convertor in the laptop.

    You could look out for an identical laptop with a duff
    screen in the free ads or Ebay. That may be the cheapest way
    of getting the laptop working again.

    The charger/convertor may be repairable at component level.
    It may be as simple as an internal fusible link has blown. A
    corner tv repair shop may be a better bet, if you have that
    sort of shop in your area.

    What make model is it? I have 3 laptops with broken screens
    that otherwise are working fine... (One sat on, one poorly
    packed in a suitcase and the last attacked by the dog..)
     
    Guest, May 27, 2004
    #3
  4. btrix

    anon Guest

    Dog food? or rival for yr affections?

     
    anon, May 27, 2004
    #4
  5. btrix

    Juan Pérez Guest

    an electrical storm and a direct lightning strike on the house where it
    surged through the wires, (especially phone lines,) and knocked out my
    laptop's modem, I just collected my $2000.00 from the Insurance then
    went shopping for a nice laptop...good luck!
     
    Juan Pérez, May 28, 2004
    #5
  6. btrix

    Jerry G. Guest

    The laptop may have been using an AC with a surge protector, but probably
    not the device connected to it on the USB port. Also, if you want to protect
    your investment, you should be running all your computer gear on a UPS, not
    a low cost alternative to protect things.

    If there are differences between the grounds, or the neutral in the AC
    driving your devices, this can cause damage from the power source.
    Brown-outs can also do extensive damage, and this is one of the things a
    good UPS will protect against.

    --

    Jerry G.
    =====


    Hello:

    My laptop was hooked up to a surge protector, but somehow, through the
    USB cord, the laptop seems to have gotten fried! We were hooking the
    USB cord from the laptop to the cable modem and a big spark and poof!

    It worked for a day on battery power, but now it won't turn on thru
    the battery or directly thru the A/C adapter.

    Compusa told me that the adapter is working fine, but I need to
    replace the "Logic Board" (part # 152600-001) and that it would cost
    me about $800!

    Any help from anyone would be so darned appreciated!

     
    Jerry G., May 28, 2004
    #6
  7. btrix

    w_tom Guest

    That surge protector worked just as manufacturer claimed. A
    dirty little secret is that plug-in protectors protect from a
    surge that typically does not exist. Therefore it can be
    called a surge protector. Manufacturer wants you to *assume*
    the protector works for all types of surges. As demonstrated
    - it did not. This should be common knowledge among the
    computer literate. They typically destructive surges are not
    stopped, blocked, or absorbed by any plug-in surge protector.
    They manufacturer does not even make that claim. But myth
    purveyors do make that claim for the manufacturer.

    Furthermore, a plug-in protector can even provide a surge
    more paths, destructively, through your computer.

    Now for a more serious problem. If the spark was between
    cable modem and computer, then you may have a far more serious
    problems that would even damage the new laptop. For example
    and also for surge protection - the cable must first make a
    direct connection to the same earth ground that AC breaker box
    connects to. This even required by National Electrical Code
    for human safety reasons. If AC electric and cable share same
    earth ground, then that spark would not have happened. That
    single point earth ground serves many purposes. One is human
    safety. Another is transistor safety. You have transistor
    damage and this would explain why.

    Cable to the single point earth ground also is the surge
    protection. The effective protection that a plug-in protector
    does not want to mention (if they mention earth ground, then
    you will discover their little 'lie by telling half truths').

    To have surge damage, first the electrical path is fully
    conductive. Electrical path may be incoming on CATV wire,
    through USB wire, through laptop motherboard and power supply
    controller (that also recharges battery), then out via laptop
    power adapter to AC mains. Only after electricity is passing
    through everything in that circuit, does something in that
    circuit fail. Sounds like the power and battery controller
    circuit on motherboard is the part of that circuit that
    failed. Same thing can happen again if you don't discover why
    a voltage difference exists between cable wire and AC
    electric.

    Again, that voltage difference must not exist if building
    was properly wired. Again, AC electric and incoming cable
    must both connect to same earth ground where both enter
    building at service entrance. Had this been done, then no
    spark on USB cable would exist to also damage the new laptop.
     
    w_tom, May 28, 2004
    #7
  8. btrix

    w_tom Guest

    The below cited post demonstrates how myths are promoted.
    For example, the recommended UPS has same electrical
    protection component used in the power strip surge protector.
    Notice both units even rate their same circuit using the same
    parameter - joules. So why would the same circuit inside a
    UPS provide any better protection?

    Noted elsewhere, a plug-in protector claims to protect from
    a surge that does not typically exist. That is also true of
    the UPS recommendation since UPS uses same circuit. Typical
    UPS connects AC electric directly to laptop when not in
    battery backup mode. So where is laptop isolation from AC
    mains? It does not exist. Manufacturer does not even make
    those claims. A myth was being promoted.

    How to identify ineffective surge protectors. 1) No
    dedicated connection 'less than 10 feet' to central earth
    ground and 2) avoids all discussion about earthing. Concepts
    of successful protection are based the the same principles
    demonstrated by Ben Franklin in 1752. Even Ben Franklin
    understood the importance of earthing. Suddenly a plug-in UPS
    is going to stop or block what miles of non-conductive air
    could not? Suddenly a direct electrical connection to AC
    mains via a plug-in UPS will do something miraculous that a
    power strip (using same circuit) could not? It is called
    promoting myths because the poster neither learned the
    underlying science nor what Ben Franklin demonstrated.

    This is fundamental. No earth ground means no effective
    surge protection. Even the plug-in UPS manufacturer avoids
    all discussion about earthing so that others might promote his
    product using myths.

    Now for some other myths. Brownouts only cause computer
    damage where the human is so technically ill informed as to
    buy inferior power supplies. Even 30 years ago, a brownout
    would not damage electronics. After all, what is a power
    down? AC power cuts off. Electrolytic capacitors slowly
    discharge into brownout. Computer sees voltage slowly drop
    eventually to zero. Normal power off is a brownout followed
    by a blackout. If brownouts damage a computer, then power off
    also damages the computer.

    Anyone claiming that brownouts damage electronics is
    promoting more myths.

    Protection that works at the computer is already inside the
    computer. Furthermore, a laptop needs no UPS. A laptop
    contains it's own UPS. But again, demonstrated is how myths
    are created. Another would recommend a UPS to protect a
    laptop even from brownouts? What is that battery inside a
    laptop for? Decoration? Should we grow flowers on that
    battery? One first learns basic electrical knowledge BEFORE
    posting technical advise. Otherwise we all suffer from the
    promotion of myths.

    That UPS recommendation is foolish, flawed, and based upon
    insufficient technical knowledge. Anything that is going to
    work at that laptop was already inside the laptop.
    Furthermore, the UPS would not stop a problem created by
    unearthed incoming cable wire. Why? First learn why all
    incoming utilities must be earthed.
     
    w_tom, May 28, 2004
    #8
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