DSLR Sales Go Up as Prices Go Down

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by SMS, Nov 21, 2008.

  1. SMS

    SMS Guest

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  2. Are you including camera phones in your "compact" category?
     
    Chris Malcolm, Nov 21, 2008
    #2
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  3. SMS

    SMS Guest

    D-SLR sales are increasing at a much faster rate than compact camera
    sales, which have peaked as the market has become saturated. Also, your
    statement isn't quite accurate, because 99.99% of D-SLR users also use
    P&S cameras on occasion as will.

    The real question to ask is why are people moving to D-SLRs in such
    large numbers?

    Price is what's enabling them to consider D-SLRs, but isn't a reason to
    buy one in and of itself. There are many reasons why people are willing
    to put up with the larger size and expense of a D-SLR and lenses.
    Surprisingly, quality of images wasn't the top reason given in a recent
    study. The top reason was dissatisfaction with one key characteristics
    of P&S cameras, and that's shutter/auto-focus lag, something P&S owners
    complain about a lot, because it's something that they didn't have to
    put up with on P&S film cameras. What this reason really translates to
    is _content_. With the P&S they were unable to capture the content they
    desired.

    The other top reasons given in the study were (not in any order)
    expandability, better low-light capability, higher image quality, the
    need for longer and wider lenses, and the desire for a faster frame
    rate. Other reasons mentioned, but less often, were the things that
    drove professionals to D-SLRs, including wider dynamic range and lower
    noise, but clearly the understanding of these issues isn't as clear
    among amateurs as it is among professionals.
     
    SMS, Nov 21, 2008
    #3
  4. SMS

    Me Here Guest

    So? What does that have to do with increased dSLR sales??? Where does your
    number of 90% come from?
     
    Me Here, Nov 21, 2008
    #4
  5. Translation: As long as he can believe that other people still want DSLRs then
    his own doubts about still wanting one won't seem so great. The only way he can
    find value in them now is if he knows that others still might. Why else would he
    care about what others are buying.
     
    LesterCromwell, Nov 21, 2008
    #5
  6. SMS

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Alfred Molon wrote:
    : > In article <bgnVk.5325$>, SMS says...
    : >> "http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/20/dslr-sales-go-up-as-prices-go-down/"
    : >
    : > That doesn't alter the fact that the overwhelming majority of people (>
    : > 90%) use compact cameras.
    :
    : D-SLR sales are increasing at a much faster rate than compact camera
    : sales, which have peaked as the market has become saturated. Also, your
    : statement isn't quite accurate, because 99.99% of D-SLR users also use
    : P&S cameras on occasion as will.
    :
    : The real question to ask is why are people moving to D-SLRs in such
    : large numbers?
    :
    : Price is what's enabling them to consider D-SLRs, but isn't a reason to
    : buy one in and of itself. There are many reasons why people are willing
    : to put up with the larger size and expense of a D-SLR and lenses.
    : Surprisingly, quality of images wasn't the top reason given in a recent
    : study. The top reason was dissatisfaction with one key characteristics
    : of P&S cameras, and that's shutter/auto-focus lag, something P&S owners
    : complain about a lot, because it's something that they didn't have to
    : put up with on P&S film cameras. What this reason really translates to
    : is _content_. With the P&S they were unable to capture the content they
    : desired.

    FWIW, that's why my wife and I switched. Specifically, we found it impossible
    to get useful pictures of our grandchildren with our P&S Canons. (Small
    children can't hold still long enough to be photographed even if they wanted
    to, which they don't.) My wife was even starting to make noises about
    reverting to her old film Nikkormat.

    We still have a use for our P&Ses, though. Over Thanksgiving, I plan to teach
    my granddaughter to use one of them. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 22, 2008
    #6
  7. SMS

    SMS Guest

    Robert Coe wrote:

    P&S digital cameras are great fun for small children. My son has used
    one since he was about 8, and he has the patience to explore all the fun
    but essentially useless features like the different sounds on the Canon
    A series (so the camera quacks or barks when you take the picture,
    rather than just clicking--something you can't do on a D-SLR).

    I warned my colleague, who was complaining about her P&S AF lag and her
    inability to get useful pictures of her two young kids that she had just
    adopted from Russia, not to buy another P&S because the lag problem
    would still be there, but she paid no attention. She also sold all her
    Pentax film equipment on craigslist for a ridiculously low amount, so
    now that she finally has realized that she must have a D-SLR if she
    wants to eliminate AF lag, she has to start from scratch.

    Nt everyone wants to become an expert on the technology they use, that's
    why Apple sells computers. It shouldn't be necessary to explain to them
    the details of contrast detection versus phase detection auto-focus, and
    why the latter is used on D-SLRs and is much faster.

    I was reading about technology from Scalado which apparently has solved
    the shutter lag problem. Images are captured continuously at a high
    frame rate, then when the shutter is pressed the image closest in time
    to when the button is pressed is stored and the rest are discarded. You
    can also take pictures in rapid succession, since essentially you're
    just choosing which frames to keep. For now it's going into camera
    phones where the shutter lag problem is even worse than on P&S digital
    cameras.
    "http://www.engadget.com/2008/11/21/scalado-demonstrates-zero-lag-cellphone-camera/"

    BTW, nothing wrong with reverting to film on occasion! Before I had a
    D-SLR, I would bring my film SLR with me on trips where I needed more
    capability than the Canon G2 offered. I had made the same mistake as our
    friend, and spent a lot of money on lens adapters (though I bought high
    quality models). They worked, but the results were far worse than using
    a film SLR.
     
    SMS, Nov 22, 2008
    #7
  8. SMS

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : : > In article <bgnVk.5325$>, SMS says...
    : >> "http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/20/dslr-sales-go-up-as-prices-go-down/"
    : >
    : > That doesn't alter the fact that the overwhelming majority of people
    : > (> 90%) use compact cameras.
    :
    : Correlates well with the percentage with IQs of 100 or less.

    Rich, you are so full of shit that fertilizer companies will bid on your
    corpse. Do you not grasp the fact that by definition 100 is the median IQ,
    meaning that half the population falls above that number and half below?

    Unlike you, I'm not a DSLR fanboy, although my wife and I are DSLR users
    almost exclusively. However, our daughter, a Yale graduate with an IQ well
    over 100, does just fine with her P&S. I wish my pictures were, on average, as
    good as hers are. With three kids under 7, she doesn't want to lug around a
    DSLR or risk her 2-year-old knocking it to the pavement.

    Does it surprise or offend you that most of us don't give a rat's ass what
    kind of camera you use? What difference does it make anyway, since none of us
    have ever actually seen a picture that you took?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 22, 2008
    #8
  9. SMS

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I was reading about technology from Scalado which apparently has solved
    : the shutter lag problem. Images are captured continuously at a high
    : frame rate, then when the shutter is pressed the image closest in time
    : to when the button is pressed is stored and the rest are discarded. You
    : can also take pictures in rapid succession, since essentially you're
    : just choosing which frames to keep. For now it's going into camera
    : phones where the shutter lag problem is even worse than on P&S digital
    : cameras.

    If you're willing to spend the money, you can always incorporate a processor
    that's fast enough to minimize shutter lag in a P&S. The interesting thing
    about the Scalado technology is that it appears to have the potential to
    eliminate photographer lag. I.e., you see the picture you want, but before
    your brain can get your finger to press the button, the scene has changed. But
    if the camera saves the last few images before the button was pressed, you can
    retrieve the one you meant to capture.

    Since the Scalado technology would appear to require a very fast processor and
    a lot of memory, I'm surprised it's considered feasible for use on a camera
    phone.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 22, 2008
    #9
  10. SMS

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >: Alfred Molon wrote:
    : >: > In article <bgnVk.5325$>, SMS says...
    : >: >> "http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/20/dslr-sales-go-up-as-prices-go-down/"
    : >: >
    : >: > That doesn't alter the fact that the overwhelming majority of people (>
    : >: > 90%) use compact cameras.
    : >:
    : >: D-SLR sales are increasing at a much faster rate than compact camera
    : >: sales, which have peaked as the market has become saturated. Also, your
    : >: statement isn't quite accurate, because 99.99% of D-SLR users also use
    : >: P&S cameras on occasion as will.
    : >:
    : >: The real question to ask is why are people moving to D-SLRs in such
    : >: large numbers?
    : >:
    : >: Price is what's enabling them to consider D-SLRs, but isn't a reason to
    : >: buy one in and of itself. There are many reasons why people are willing
    : >: to put up with the larger size and expense of a D-SLR and lenses.
    : >: Surprisingly, quality of images wasn't the top reason given in a recent
    : >: study. The top reason was dissatisfaction with one key characteristics
    : >: of P&S cameras, and that's shutter/auto-focus lag, something P&S owners
    : >: complain about a lot, because it's something that they didn't have to
    : >: put up with on P&S film cameras. What this reason really translates to
    : >: is _content_. With the P&S they were unable to capture the content they
    : >: desired.
    : >
    : >FWIW, that's why my wife and I switched. Specifically, we found it impossible
    : >to get useful pictures of our grandchildren with our P&S Canons. (Small
    : >children can't hold still long enough to be photographed even if they wanted
    : >to, which they don't.) My wife was even starting to make noises about
    : >reverting to her old film Nikkormat.
    :
    : A perfect example, to prove that point & shoot snapshooters go to the dslr for
    : its more easy to use automatic features. They can't improve on the dslr's design
    : nor functions due to the crippling mirror/shutter system so all they can do is
    : improve on how automatic it is. Whereas a pro goes to the advanced P&S for all
    : the convenience, adaptability, silent operation, and greater chances of getting
    : their shots without having to change lenses nor stop to clean the sensor so all
    : your photos that day aren't ruined.

    There may be a few pros who use a P&S occasionally, but every pro I've ever
    seen using a digital camera was using a DSLR.

    : I'd bet that you can't live without your auto-focus--and I'd win.

    No, you'd lose. I recently bought Katzeye focusing screens for both of my
    DSLRs to aid in manual focusing. Autofocus is a good invention, and I use it a
    lot, but there are times when you need to go manual to get the focus in the
    right spot.

    : >We still have a use for our P&Ses, though. Over Thanksgiving, I plan to teach
    : >my granddaughter to use one of them. ;^)
    :
    : May she learn photography from it instead of how to become a snapshooter like
    : yourself. If you really want her to learn then you would hand her a camera
    : without one single automatic feature on it. If you must, get a decent P&S camera
    : and super-glue the mode button to MANUAL. Showing her how to set it to AUTO like
    : you always do with your dslr is doing her a major disservice.

    She's SIX YEARS OLD, you fool. A kid that age has to concentrate on learning
    to see what's worth photographing and on the most basic rules of composition.
    The proposition that her camera should be deliberately made more difficult to
    use is too absurd to justify rebuttal. And where do you get your information
    about what kind of photographer I am? I've never met you, and I doubt that
    you've seen any of my work. Are you clairvoyant or something?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 22, 2008
    #10
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