Does anyone make a color test card for CRT/printer setup color adjustment ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Al Dykes, Apr 12, 2004.

  1. Al Dykes

    Al Dykes Guest

    I've seen screen calibration spiders, and similar accessories
    to calibrate a printer and it's a bit much at my stage
    of expertese and equipment.

    As a lower-tech approach, does anyone make a test card that covers the
    range of colors I can expect to handle. I can shoot it with my
    digicam, look at the results on-screen and print it.

    It would also be useful to be able to download the same image
    from the manufacturer's web site to compare print and compare
    to the test card. The web site could have the same image
    in different profiles, in tif, and Photoshop formats.

    Is there a better way ?
     
    Al Dykes, Apr 12, 2004
    #1
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  2. Al Dykes

    jpc Guest


    Collect some paint sample cards from your local paint store, take a
    couple images and compare what you see on the monitor and in a print
    with what you see on the cards. This won't satify a color management
    purist but it will get you close. And you can't beat the price.

    jpc
     
    jpc, Apr 12, 2004
    #2
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  3. jpc wrote in
    This method will not really work. It assumes that you can ...
    .... trust the cameras white balance when photographing colored cards.
    .... somehow modify the monitors color output without making a profile.
    .... somehow modify the printers color output without making a profile.

    I am no color management purist, but I would say that it will
    be hard to get close :)


    /Roland
     
    Roland Karlsson, Apr 12, 2004
    #3
  4. If so - please tell me also :)

    Nope - I have found no method for color calibrating a monitor
    without measuring it. You can calibrate gamma, but not color.

    But if you want to try - this is what I propose.

    The Canon printers seem to have rather good color calibration
    from the factory (at least my i9100 does). Buy a Canon printer.
    Then - print a test picture that contains some step tablets
    and some skin tone pictures. Then use the settings on your monitor
    to get the color "feel" as close as possible. BTW - my previous
    Epson (970) was way off and needed serious color calibration.

    Don't forget that your tungsten lamp is probably 2700 Kelvin
    and the light leeking in from the window might be up to 12000
    Kelvin. So ... any monitor calibration you make might be totally
    bogus anyway.


    /Roland
     
    Roland Karlsson, Apr 12, 2004
    #4
  5. Al Dykes

    Robert Polk Guest

    Go to www.qpcard.se
    They make a test card that you can use in your editing program.

    Digital Bob
     
    Robert Polk, Apr 12, 2004
    #5
  6. Al Dykes

    Flycaster Guest

    Roland, this is probably where I depart from a few of my color management
    brethren. For a fellow that simply wants to get fair WYSIWYG output from
    his/her system, and could care less about going to an outside printer, your
    advice is fine. I know...this is a departure from what I normally
    recommend: it is NOT the optimum way to calibrate, but for the guy who
    simply wants to make home prints that reasonably match his monitor,
    adjusting the monitor to match to match the prints is OK. Heresy, perhaps,
    but OK? Yeah.
     
    Flycaster, Apr 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Al Dykes

    jpc Guest

    One or the other of us is either under-responding or over-responding
    to the OP question.

    Ths OP asked "-As a lower-tech approach, does anyone make a test card
    that covers the
    range of colors I can expect to handle. I can shoot it with my
    digicam, look at the results on-screen and print it.

    It would also be useful to be able to download the same image
    from the manufacturer's web site to compare print and compare
    to the test card. The web site could have the same image
    in different profiles, in tif, and Photoshop formats. "

    I took him to be asking is there a quick and dirty way to find out if
    the colors he was seeing on his screen and in his print were close the
    true colors he was photographing. And you will have to admit that
    laying the original sample down next to the print is perhaps the most
    accurate ways of detecting slight differences in colors.

    In other words I was suggesting a way to test weither he had problems
    with white balance, saturation, color profiles, and so on. If, after
    deciding he couldn't live with what he was seeing, he came back to ask
    how to fix things, that would be a far more complicated question.

    jpc
     
    jpc, Apr 13, 2004
    #7
  8. Corel photopaint used to package a test card that you could scan, you
    then used its profileing software on the scan and it, supposedly,
    worked out the differences between what it was ment to look like and
    the scaned result... I didnt think it really worked very well.. and
    didnt work after you'd printed the test tiff and re-scanned it to
    decide where your printer fitted in the equasion.

    all that said... colour is way to subjective, while you may get
    absolutly perfect colour matching using a spider etc, it doesnt match
    what viewers of your final prints feel... especially if they are used
    to photoshops/photobooths that boost the colours to make photos more
    punchy, however if you are submitting to a client that understands
    that kind of thing, then good matching is very important at least as
    far as the camera and final tiff is concerned, after that its up to
    them if they want to frig it to make it look punchy for the
    publications.
     
    Jonathan Wilson, Apr 13, 2004
    #8
  9. Al Dykes

    Wilt W Guest

    As a lower-tech approach, does anyone make a test card that covers the
    The classic way to take pictures on film (huh...what's that?!?!) is to use a
    Macbeth Color Checker to balance the print exactly to the card for color
    accuracy.

    --Wilton
     
    Wilt W, Apr 13, 2004
    #9
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