Disney Dispose of Disposable DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Allan, Feb 8, 2005.

  1. Allan

    Allan Guest

    Disney Dispose of Disposable DVDs
    Date Tuesday, February 08 @ 04:31:51
    Topic Latest News

    We reported in 2003 that Disney were to start selling self-destructing
    DVDs. Basically you could watch these discs for 48 hours after you buy
    them, but the discs coating reacts with oxygen and turns black and
    unreadable after that time. Disney marketed it as a rental that you
    never had to remember to bring back to avoid late fees.
    The disc was called EZ-D by its developer Flexplay. However, Disney
    has now decided to drop the self-destructing DVDs, but that doesn't
    necessarily mean the technology is dead just yet.

    Flexplay has been sold to Atlanta-based Convex Group, who now plan to
    release content in this format. "We believe wholeheartedly in the
    platform," said Dawn Whaley, executive vice president of the Convex
    Group.

    "I don't think we would have acquired a company if we didn't think it
    would be successful." The discs have been attacked by
    environmentalists who say it will lead to unnecessary waste in
    landfills.

    Convex Group released an independent film, Noel, during the holidays.
    It now says it is talking with retail partners and content providers,
    and plans to roll out additional titles later in 2005.

    A spokesman for Buena Vista Home Entertainment, the division of Disney
    that released the films, confirmed that its disposable DVD pilot
    program is over. He said they are now evaluating what they want to do
    next.

    One of the main issues that caused this format to so far be mostly
    ignored by consumers is its price tag. $7 for a DVD that destroys
    itself after 48 hours is a bit high.

    Also, the main claim behind these discs, that they remove the need to
    remember to bring back movies to rental services to avoid late fees is
    no longer that good, as rental giant Blockbuster has nixed its late
    fees. Netflix, another popular rental service, never charged late
    fees.






    "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game
    because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable from
    -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time."
    - Neil Stephenson, _Cryptonomicon_
     
    Allan, Feb 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. Allan

    RichA Guest

    Another disgusting Divx variant (not the file program) bites the dust.
    Good. The greedy bastards who run Disney take another hit.
    Will Dawn Whaley follow in the same footsteps as Richard Sharp
    of Circuit City???
     
    RichA, Feb 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. Allan

    theyak Guest


    heh, dvddecrypter only needs 5 minutes.
     
    theyak, Feb 8, 2005
    #3
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