Digital photo of a page to be viewed on mac and pc

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RPS, Jan 30, 2007.

  1. RPS

    RPS Guest

    I have to take a digital photograph of a page (US letter size, mostly
    text). The resulting computer file would be distrubuted among several
    people who for viewing and printing on both Macs and PC's.

    I do not have any way to know who will have what software installed on
    their computer, so I must assume a basic generic setup.

    With that in mind, (1) What format do I want? (2) What size the file
    should be in pixels, for it to be viewed comfortably on screen and
    printed?

    Thanks.
     
    RPS, Jan 30, 2007
    #1
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  2. RPS

    ZnU Guest

    You'd really be much better off using a scanner.
    PDF, ideally. Basically everyone can also open GIF and JPEG files, but
    it'll be more work for the people printing them to get them to fill
    (but not spill over) a single page.
    1275x1650 (150 DPI) *minimum* for a decent 8.5x11 print. Twice that
    would be better.
     
    ZnU, Jan 30, 2007
    #2
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  3. RPS

    RPS Guest

    I don't have scanner (dumped my all-in-one for a nice laser printer),
    but if it is that much better I could see if Kinko's would do it.
    Yes, that was my concern, which is why asked what pixel-setting should
    I use.
     
    RPS, Jan 30, 2007
    #3
  4. RPS

    Bucky Guest

    You'd really be much better off using a scanner.

    taking a macro with a digital camera is pretty decent nowadays. of
    course scanner is more ideal, but the digicam will work perfectly fine
    too.
    if you're taking a digicam, then the native format will be jpeg, so
    just send them a jpeg. if it's just 1 page, most image viewers have
    built-in functionality to resize an image to print on 1 page (at least
    Windows Picture Viewer does, and if windows does, then surely Mac
    does).
    Yup 150-300 dpi. So roughly, you'll need between 3-6 megapixel image.
     
    Bucky, Jan 30, 2007
    #4
  5. RPS

    fred Guest

    A standard fine res fax is 200 DPI, so that would give you some idea of what is
    generally accepted as readable text.
     
    fred, Jan 30, 2007
    #5
  6. RPS

    -Art- Guest

    |:I have to take a digital photograph of a page (US letter size, mostly
    |:text). The resulting computer file would be distrubuted among several
    |:people who for viewing and printing on both Macs and PC's.
    |:
    |:I do not have any way to know who will have what software installed on
    |:their computer, so I must assume a basic generic setup.
    |:
    |:With that in mind, (1) What format do I want? (2) What size the file
    |:should be in pixels, for it to be viewed comfortably on screen and
    |:printed?
    |:
    |:Thanks.

    why not just put the image file into a pdf?
    that should make it easier for everyone.

    -Art- (not Art)
     
    -Art-, Jan 30, 2007
    #6
  7. RPS

    tomm42 Guest

    There is a difference in resolution for projection and print. For
    print you want final page size x 300ppi. For projection (in
    PowerPoint) 8 inches high x width at 100ppi. Image for the higher res
    and resize the image for projection. The biggest problem in
    photographing books is keeping the page flat, very necessary and
    reasonably difficult. That is why a scanner is a good investment, even
    a $100 one.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jan 30, 2007
    #7
  8. RPS

    jeremy Guest

    For print, Adobe PDF format would be about as universal as he could get. If
    his scanner cannot scan directly to PDF, he can scan as a TIF and then use a
    freeware converter application to make the file a PDF. PrimoPDF can be
    downloaded for free.
     
    jeremy, Jan 30, 2007
    #8
  9. I have to take a digital photograph of a page (US letter size, mostly
    Two things to keep in mind:

    First, if you use JPG for file compression --- and you almost
    certainly will, use a high quality setting. Otherwise it will be
    hard to read the text.

    Secondly, you probably need different files for viewing and for
    printing. For viewing, assume 72dpi, which is to say, a file size of
    about 612x792. For printing, you'll want at least 150 dpi, and
    preferably 300 dpi, though the files will be so large that no one will
    want to use them. In general, a graphics file is a bad way to give
    someone something to print.

    -Joel
     
    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Jan 30, 2007
    #9
  10. RPS

    ray Guest

    jpeg or pdf would probably be good choices.
     
    ray, Jan 30, 2007
    #10
  11. RPS

    Ken Lucke Guest

    Wouldn't scanning be better?
    PDF

    --
    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
    the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
    independence.
    -- Charles A. Beard
     
    Ken Lucke, Jan 30, 2007
    #11
  12. RPS

    Denominator Guest

    I used to use OCR to convert scanned print into RTF, with which many
    applications can print crisp documents from small files.

    The US Patent Office uses TIFF at 300 dpi for many records. For an 8
    megapixel page, their compressed TIFF was 136kB. Not all applications
    can handle various TIFF compression schemes. Uncompressed TIFF was 1MB.
    GIF was 260kB. Reasonably good JPG was 2.3MB.

    RTF might be 5kB or so.
     
    Denominator, Jan 30, 2007
    #12
  13. RPS

    C J Campbell Guest

    PDF is the only way to go. It is the most simple, everyone can read it, and
    it doesn't change the way it looks from one computer to another. There are
    plenty of utilities that will take an ordinary Word or similar document and
    convert it to PDF.

    Otherwise, JPG. Everyone has a JPG viewer. Obviously, someone who has a VGA
    screen is going to want very low resolution, say, no more than 640 pixels on
    a side. Don't worry about those folks. For a photo, I generally want to limit
    it to 800 pixels on a side, but that would be too small for text. You want at
    least 1020 pixels, but then it might not be easy to display on a single
    screen, which gets us back to PDF, which can be easily re-sized for anybody's
    viewing preference.
     
    C J Campbell, Jan 30, 2007
    #13
  14. RPS

    Bill Guest

    Could you name a couple, please. I have had trrouble finding one that
    works consistently.

    Thanks
     
    Bill, Jan 30, 2007
    #14
  15. RPS

    John of Aix Guest

    Mais il est fou lui C'est une image, pas besoin d'avoir un fichier PDF
    lourdingue pour ça. JPG, BMP, GIF ou autre format quasi-universel fera
    parfaitement l'affaire
     
    John of Aix, Jan 30, 2007
    #15
  16. RPS

    John of Aix Guest

    John of Aix wrote:

    Whoops, in French again.

    I was saying that PDF is for nutcases. A simple JPG, BMP, GIF or any
    other quasi-universal file will be perfectly OK
     
    John of Aix, Jan 30, 2007
    #16
  17. RPS

    John of Aix Guest

    PDF requires something to convert to PDFwhich is not native to a basic
    PC, en top of that for what it doezs (we're talking one page here) it
    incredibly heavy (Kb wise) and generally, in my opinion, PDF is crap and
    a waste of time. I have never yet seen a file that couldn't be handled
    just as well as Word document or similar.
     
    John of Aix, Jan 30, 2007
    #17
  18. RPS

    John of Aix Guest

    It also requires third party software and for that is not the best
    choice for anyone. A simple image of good quality will do fine in the
    case under discussion.
     
    John of Aix, Jan 30, 2007
    #18
  19. RPS

    John of Aix Guest

    Exactly. It requires third party software or add-ons, images do not. You
    have a picture to send, not a picture and readable and modifiable text
    to send. It is therefore completely useless to change it into a very
    heavy format such as PDF which will not only make its display ugly
    (because read in Acrobat Reader) but will print no better. Send a good
    quality image and that will do.
     
    John of Aix, Jan 30, 2007
    #19
  20. RPS

    Ken Lucke Guest

    "Portable Document Format" files, a file format specifically and
    intentionally designed to be capable of being read by freely available
    (and free of charge) readers on virtually every graphics-screen capable
    computer known to mankind, aren't "quasi-universal"?

    OK.

    ::sigh:: There goes another illusion....

    --
    You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
    reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
    the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
    independence.
    -- Charles A. Beard
     
    Ken Lucke, Jan 30, 2007
    #20
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