Dash cam for Android that loops endlessly in five or ten minuteloops?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Eddie Powalski, Jan 17, 2014.

  1. A friend told me of a road-rage incident he witnessed
    where we discussed that it might be nice to set up
    our Android phones as dash cams.

    All it would need is a looping mechanism, where the
    video file size is fixed at a user-set level, say,
    100MB (or whatever).

    Does this dash-cam video looping Android app exist?
     
    Eddie Powalski, Jan 17, 2014
    #1
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  2. Eddie Powalski

    charles Guest


    Something like this?

    http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_...r-watches-your-back-er-front-while-you-drive/

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dailyroads.v&hl=en

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dailyroads.v&hl=en

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.androidlab.videoroad&hl=en
     
    charles, Jan 17, 2014
    #2
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  3. Per Eddie Powalski:
    Yes. Several exist, but when I tried a few the real-world usability
    fell short of a relatively-cheap dedicated cam. The hassle of bringing
    up the app and aiming the phone, for instance.

    AFIK, all dedicated dashcams automagically recycle SD card space and
    most have a provision for moving selected clips to a folder whose
    contents is not part of the recycle process.

    There are some quite-good dedicated devices tested on TechMoan.com. He's
    got a favorite that's less than a hundred bucks, although I cannot cite.

    I've got two: a higher-end cam (as in $250) facing forward and an
    el-cheapo (as <$80) in facing rearward.

    Lower-end dashcams take some researching. The market is full of
    look-alike/ripoff/clones of the real deals. Expect to pay 20% more to
    buy from somebody with a reputation and have some assurance that you get
    what you expect.

    Higher-end cams allow the user to mark the currently-recorded clip and,
    with my front-facing cam, all I have to do is tilt the recorder part of
    the cam to trip the g-sensor and the clip is marked. Most cams with
    this feature have a button on the camera... mine has a separate body for
    the recording apparatus.

    However I still have the feeling that when the big one happens, I'll be
    left falling short in terms of recorded coverage.

    My own take is that the real solution is a sort of micro-DVR with maybe
    a half-dozen cams recording simultaneously. Such devices exist, but
    all the ones I've seen so far are CCTV - and the rez of CCTV is, IMHO,
    inadequate.
     
    (PeteCresswell), Jan 17, 2014
    #3
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