Damn! I love my new Canon XTi/400D

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. John

    John Guest

    I bought a new DSLR. I never owned or used a DSLR before so this was a whole
    new experience for me. My last digital Camera was an expensive 5 year old
    Sony POS.

    I bought PhotoShop CS2 and a bunch of books. I have an extensive background
    in film photography from years ago and this digital stuff is just so
    different that I have to basically start all over again.

    From everything I read in the forums regarding the lousy kit lens, I bought
    a Canon 24-105 f/4L IS USM lens instead. I tried out the cheaper lens and
    they felt awful. For indoor shooting I bought a prime Canon 50mm 1.8 lens
    ($69) that should arrive this week (I know the lens housing is crap but the
    glass is supposed to be good).

    I shoot everything in RAW so I bought a Sandisk 2GB Extreme III CF and a
    Sandisk firewire CF reader for speed.

    Anyway, I'm still learning and taken a bunch of test photographs
    (http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]). I've seen other people's
    galleries so I know what good photographs and mine are just test shots.

    The photograph that impressed me the most is my self-portrait (well, sort of)
    in the dog's eye. I shot that at 1600 ISO and the resolution is still pretty
    good.

    I found that learning the camera's menus was fairly easy. I've read that many
    people have found the camera body too small for their large hands but since
    my hands are small I don't have any problems handling the camera.

    Anyway I'm have a blast and I love the clarity of the photographs. One of my
    projects that I've put off for too many years is photographing everything in
    my house for insurance purposes. I uploaded the images to an off-site server
    so if something catastrophic happens I'll have a record what I owned. I know
    that any digital camera could have done this (except for my Sony digital) but
    this helps me rationalize the price of the camera.
     
    John, Dec 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. John

    Celcius Guest

    John,
    You seem to be a passionate person.
    Have fun and enjoy your newly found hobby.
    Marcel
     
    Celcius, Dec 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. John

    Annika1980 Guest

    Congrats on a great purchase and welcome to the Canon Collective!
    Now just get a macro lens and you can get in really close.
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/42255088

    The price will only be rationalized if your house burns down.
    I see a 1DsMKII in your future, Sparky.
     
    Annika1980, Dec 4, 2006
    #3
  4. I love my 400D too. I also have no trouble with the size of the camera.

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Dec 4, 2006
    #4
  5. John

    Bill Guest

    Welcome to the SLR club!
    Actually, I found it wasn't that different. The knowledge you gained
    from film is essentially the same for digital exposures. The only
    thing I found different was that post processing is a LOT faster and
    easier since I'm already in the digital domain.
    Both are fine lenses and good choices. If you do any close landscape,
    group, or indoor shots, you will probably want a wider lense. Canons
    10-22 is a highly regarded wide angle.

    And of course you'll also need a big zoom telephoto, and a macro, and
    an external flash, more memory cards...it's addictive.

    :)
    That was my problem. At first I liked the small size and weight of the
    Rebel XT/350D, but using larger lenses I slowly found a larger body
    was needed - my fingers would get sore holding the camera for extended
    periods. I know own a Nikon D80 and it's much more comfortable for me
    to hold.
    Things will only get better from here.
     
    Bill, Dec 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Ewe (!) Gross- looks like sushi with hair. Don't look!
    Good work on the rationalization, perhaps I will do the same. And above
    all, have a lot of fun and joy with these babies.
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 5, 2006
    #6
  7. John

    dwight Guest

    I really like that 50mm; it's almost always on camera. It'll focus on one
    hair. Or the one next to it. Folks here called it the best bang for the
    buck, and I'm a believer.

    The 70-300 f/4-5.6 is fun, not as sharp as I'd like. Bill mentions the 10-22
    wide angle, and I'm scribbling that onto my wish list... That would make
    four lenses...

    ....with so many more to buy.

    dwight
     
    dwight, Dec 5, 2006
    #7
  8. John

    Bill Guest

    It's perfect for portraits on 1.5-1.6x FOV crop factor cameras, and
    don't worry about perspective, it works just right.
    For telephotos, if you don't need f/2.8 have a look at the 70-200 f/4
    L lenses. Until recently I was the very proud owner and user of the
    non-IS model and it's a fantastic lense, especially for the price. It
    doesn't get much better - sharp, fast, and lightweight.

    The f/2.8 versions are just as good, but a lot bigger and heavier.

    Having said that, I'm now the proud owner of a new Nikon 70-200 VR
    lense. I played with an 80-200 for quite a while, but I couldn't
    tolerate the focus mechanism (I was spoiled by Canons USM). I'm also
    waiting to get my hands on the new 70-300 VR which I'm hoping will be
    good for travel.

    Tis the season, so I'll be quite active with the camera for the next
    month. Have fun with yours!

    :)
     
    Bill, Dec 5, 2006
    #8
  9. John

    Todd H. Guest

    Me too... I don't konw that you can rightly call a $70 lens a "prime"
    but all the same, it's a lens I'm shocked more dSLR photogs don't have
    and use.
     
    Todd H., Dec 5, 2006
    #9
  10. John

    John Guest

    As I understand it, a 'prime' lens means a fixed non-zoom lens.
     
    John, Dec 5, 2006
    #10
  11. John

    Scott W Guest

    At the price the 50mm 1.8 lens is a must have, takes great photos.

    I also picked up the 28mm f/2.8 lens, with the crop factor I found the
    50mm too long in many cases and the 28mm just about right.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 5, 2006
    #11
  12. John

    mogh baba Guest

    congrats and good luck

    Mogh
     
    mogh baba, Dec 5, 2006
    #12
  13. John

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Zooms are all the rage. Back in the ancient film days when
    zooms were both rare and very bad lenses, we all used fixed
    focus lenses. We made do. We learned composition and texture
    and perspective.

    For many years (about 20) all I had was a 50mm fixed focal length
    lens. I took a zillion pictures with it.

    When the time came that I could afford a 135mm f/2.8 lens I was
    ecstatic. And that held me for the next decade.

    I'll also add that I, like many others, used ISO 25 film at the
    time. I am not alone. There are many here that did the same.

    Today's zooms are wonderful. I have a number of them. I also
    still have a 50mm f/1.8 fixed focal length lens. It is as sharp
    as you say.
     
    Paul J Gans, Dec 5, 2006
    #13
  14. John

    threlly Guest

    I've also just bought my first DSLR, also a Canon XTi/400D.
    I'm really burning to nail HDR with it, but I want to try some portrait
    HDR
    of friends and family.
    Somebody suggested I get a 70-200mm for portraits as there is less
    distortion
    in the depth of field ???
    I've done one handheld HDR test with it and was very happy with the
    results.
    My user name on Flickr is also Threlly.
     
    threlly, Dec 5, 2006
    #14
  15. John

    M-M Guest

    A longer lens for portraits is good because the subject's eyes are fixed
    at a more distant point and that look is infinitely better.
     
    M-M, Dec 6, 2006
    #15
  16. John

    Bill Guest


    Close, but not quite correct in this instance.

    Perspective is determined by distance only, not focal length. See this
    page for an explanation and examples:

    http://hannemyr.com/photo/crop.html#per

    So with a 1.6x field of view crop factor camera like the XTi, a 50mm
    is an almost perfect portrait lense. A 70mm is a bit long, but usable,
    while a typical 50mm will cost a lot less.

    For an example of field of view crops:

    http://jimdoty.com/Digital/fov_crop/fov_crop.html
     
    Bill, Dec 6, 2006
    #16
  17. John

    M-M Guest


    Close, but not quite correct in this instance.

    Perspective is determined by distance only, not focal length.[/QUOTE]

    My point is that with a longer lens, the photographer can be farther
    away from the subject and still fill the frame with the subject's face.
    The eyes will then have a different gaze which is much more natural and
    revealing than that "look into the camera and smile" look.

    Here is an example, although this was a REALLY long lens (1500mm):

    http://www.netaxs.com/~mhmyers/family/ecm.jpg
     
    M-M, Dec 6, 2006
    #17
  18. My point is that with a longer lens, the photographer can be farther
    away from the subject and still fill the frame with the subject's face.
    The eyes will then have a different gaze which is much more natural and
    revealing than that "look into the camera and smile" look.

    Here is an example, although this was a REALLY long lens (1500mm):

    http://www.netaxs.com/~mhmyers/family/ecm.jpg[/QUOTE]

    That's a nice shot, but I saw only a thumbnail. As to natural look, I
    think you captured it, but was this not more in the realm of a candid?
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 6, 2006
    #18
  19. To many. But there are "prime" primes, and not-so-prime "primes". .....
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 6, 2006
    #19
  20. John

    M-M Guest

    That's a nice shot, but I saw only a thumbnail. As to natural look, I
    think you captured it, but was this not more in the realm of a candid?[/QUOTE]

    Yea, you're right. But I used it to show my point to the extreme, that
    using a long lens for portraits and zooming in can give that candid
    look.

    Here's a better example- 300mm:

    http://www.netaxs.com/~mhmyers/temp/avmaz.jpg
     
    M-M, Dec 7, 2006
    #20
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