D70 + SB600 bounce needs exposure comp

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joe, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. Joe

    Joe Guest

    I'm finding that in bounce mode with TTL I'm needing +2/3 - +1 stop of
    exposure compensation.

    This isn't meant to be the case, right? Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?
     
    Joe, Dec 7, 2005
    #1
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  2. Joe

    Eager Guest

    Qs:

    What are you bouncing off?
    Does the SB600's little red light flash after an exposure? (Indicates
    the flash is hitting its max and may not be illuminating the subject.)
    Are you sure BL mode is off on the flash?

    My best results come from Program mode on the D70, fwiw...

    -=-Joe
     
    Eager, Dec 7, 2005
    #2
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  3. Joe

    Joe Guest

    Bouncing off a white ceiling, and the flash isn't maxing out. If I set
    +0.7 or +1.0 on the flash I get a good exposure, but I thought the
    whole point of TTL was that this shouldn't be necessary.
     
    Joe, Dec 7, 2005
    #3
  4. Joe

    Tesco News Guest


    Hi.

    Theory is one thing and actual usage is nearly always something else.

    Just apply the compensation you need.

    Nikon have, always, had a reputation for setting Camera Metering for
    underexposure. I think it harks back to the old days of Slide Film and
    underexposing to ensure well saturated colours.

    Roy G
     
    Tesco News, Dec 8, 2005
    #4
  5. Joe

    masullo Guest

    I have the same problem with my SB800 and I just dial in +1 on the
    flash or on the D70
    This should not be the case but is. I think it has somthing to do with
    the distance info received back from the lens. Since the distance to
    the subject that is being reported
    is much less than the distance the flash has to travel.
     
    masullo, Dec 8, 2005
    #5
  6. Joe

    Joe Guest

    fair enough... but now I wish I'd gotten the SB800 !
     
    Joe, Dec 8, 2005
    #6
  7. Joe

    Joe Guest

    I guess I assumed that TTL meant that a known pre-flash was measured by
    the camera, which could then calculate how strong the actual flash
    should be, but if that were the case, then the distance is irrelevant...
     
    Joe, Dec 8, 2005
    #7
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