Coolpix 8700 question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jmc, Aug 6, 2004.

  1. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Got my 8700 today, had to RTFM to figure it out. There's something it
    is doing that's annoying me though, and I'm not quite sure how to
    correct or compensate: It's popping the speedlight up at light levels
    that should not require a flash. And since the flash's distance is
    fairly short, I end up with very dark photos.

    My 4300, in the same light, has no problem taking pictures without a
    flash.

    I'm not a pro, and tend to leave the camera on automatic unless I'm
    trying to do something specific. Appreciate any advice you can offer!

    jmc
    usenet [at] jodi [dit] ws
    Any day you learn something isn't a total waste.
     
    jmc, Aug 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. jmc

    Ken Guest

    Jmc
    Just turn off the flash... I have to do that on my 5700.
    Ken
     
    Ken, Aug 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Well, yea, I'm doing that... but should I have to? What's so
    different about the 8700 that it can't handle light levels that the
    4300 can - the 4300 will take a picture at 1/125, no flash, and the
    8700 will want the flash, or take the picture at 1/30 or slower.

    Is this normal for the higher-end cameras?

    jmc

    jmc
    usenet [at] jodi [dit] ws
    Any day you learn something isn't a total waste.
     
    jmc, Aug 6, 2004
    #3
  4. jmc

    Frank ess Guest

    Seems to me it has to do with the ISO 50 possible with the CP8700, and
    the focus-assist lamp that is located in the pop-up flash. It wants to
    glow at something to reassure itself focusing will take place. It even
    pops up in not-that-low-if-you-are-used-to-a-CP5700 light, with the
    flash turned off. I had it jump up at the beach. Overcast, sure, but...

    There is some serious learning to plod through in the 8700. Like a new
    girlfriend: it takes lots of exposure and experience tobe comfortable
    with all the nuances.
     
    Frank ess, Aug 6, 2004
    #4
  5. jmc

    jmc Guest

    Frank, thanks. That'd actually be boyfriend to me, that is, if I
    wasn't already taken... but works the same either way. Hopefully it
    won't take as long to work out the nuances on the 8700 as it is to
    work them with my spouse :)

    Incidentally, the 4300 also uses ISO 50, but perhaps it raises it to
    100 in lower light than the 8700 does.

    Goin' out today to put the 8700 through it's paces.

    jmc
    usenet [at] jodi [dit] ws
    Any day you learn something isn't a total waste.
     
    jmc, Aug 7, 2004
    #5
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