Computer about to be thrown out of the window

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Trent SC, Feb 6, 2005.

  1. Trent SC

    Duane Arnold Guest

     
    Duane Arnold, Feb 7, 2005
    #61
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  2. Trent SC

    Matt Guest

    For 100 MHz Pentiums it was always or usually on the mainboard or on a
    separate stick called a COAST (Cache On A STick).
     
    Matt, Feb 7, 2005
    #62
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  3. Trent SC

    Matt Guest

     
    Matt, Feb 7, 2005
    #63
  4. Trent SC

    kony Guest

    On some (Pentium 2 & 3) there was a seperate bus on the slot
    1 carrier.
    http://www.hardwarecentral.com/graphics/screenshots/sl35d250mhz.JPG

    Prior to that they were logically on the FSB as memory
    chips (typicallly socket 7 boards) or (chip) sockets
    soldered to the board itself.
    http://home.hiwaay.net/~andy1/fake.html
     
    kony, Feb 7, 2005
    #64
  5. Mxsmanic, <>, the three-way, pointless farm boy, and
    keeper of the kitchen cupboard, reeked:

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!
     
    Prok the grass-blackmailer, Feb 7, 2005
    #65
  6. I'll be. Thanks (and to Matt, for his response, too.) I had a couple
    of S7 boards, too, come to think of it.
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 7, 2005
    #66
  7. Trent SC

    Mxsmanic Guest

    It was, but I don't remember which CPUs (original Pentiums or PPros?).
     
    Mxsmanic, Feb 7, 2005
    #67
  8. Trent SC

    Mxsmanic Guest

    With AMD, yes. The processor reached at least 240° F. Apparently there
    is nothing in AMD Athlon processors that slows the processor down or
    halts it in the event of overheating. Intel processors have such
    protection built in.
     
    Mxsmanic, Feb 7, 2005
    #68
  9. That'll leave a mark. :-/
    I think AMD does *now* -- how long ago were you frying eggs with that
    one? (I'm used to BIOSs with heat warnings, for AMD, but that's not
    much help if you're at the Stop'n'Rob getting brews when the fan goes
    south.
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 7, 2005
    #69
  10. On second thougfht (I hadn't noticed it was an ECS board before),
    check the Power Supply Capacotors on the Motherboard first. ECS MB's
    are notorious for the "Bad Cap" problem.

    They SHOULD all have nice flat tops - bad ones will be swollen, there
    will probably be leakage, and the tops will be "domed". They cause
    some of the same symptoms as you're describing, usually gradually
    getting worse, and eventually the computer will not boot at all.

    Read more @:

    http://www.badcaps.net/


    If the caps seem OK, my money's STILL on the PSU.


    M
     
    mhaase-at-springmind.com, Feb 7, 2005
    #70
  11. Trent SC

    Toolman Tim Guest

    | Dr Harvie Wahl-Banghor wrote:
    |
    | > While the PC is booting, you have to go into the BIOS. Some, but not
    | > all, BIOS will allow you to disable the L2 cache as one of the menu
    | > features.
    |
    | He's got a Celeron. Refresh my memory, if you will: aren't Celerons
    | reduced-L2 (as versus the P from which they derive) CPUs in the first
    | place? (Not that the test disablement isn't a worthwhile thing.)
    |
    |
    Celeron 766 has 128k L2 cache
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 8, 2005
    #71
  12. Trent SC

    Toolman Tim Guest

    | ["Followup-To:" header set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk.] Toolman Tim
    | wrote:
    |
    | > | >| Hi There, | | I Sympathise with you | I've had mine almost 8 years, I
    | >keep updating it at a helluva cost | and it's getting slower and slower
    | >and confusing | I have the monitor on the window sill | and my good
    | >lady has to stop me several times per day from pushing it out of | the
    | >window | | Alf | Yeah - I upgraded over and over and eventually had
    | >such a mixed up batch of parts, I finally started over. But thankfully
    | >it wasn't quite bad enough to throw out the window - I gave it away.
    |
    | My desktop system's lineage goes back to a February 1990 Zeos (pretty
    | large manufacturer at the time) 386SX-16[1]. I've always done my
    upgrading
    | piece(s) by piece(s), so most of the hardware has remained for each
    | upgrade.
    |
    | [1]2MB RAM (DIP packages, not xIMMs), 35MB HD.
    |
    Geez, Blinkster...I've got a couple of those in the storeroom still! And a
    ziplock bag half full of DIP memory chips!
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 8, 2005
    #72
  13. Trent SC

    flipper Guest

    On socket 7, and earlier, motherboards it was on the motherboard, if
    there was any L2 at all. For celerons, and all newer processors, the
    L2 cache is on the CPU die and disabling it, if the option even
    exists, would make the processor unbearably slow.

    As for some of the other suggestions, Intel processors include an
    on-die thermal shutdown protection circuit and I've never seen one
    'damaged by heat'. They 'lock up' first.

    The heatsink being 'cool' to the touch is not an indicator it's
    working properly. It can just as easily mean the heat is not getting
    to it; as in poor thermal contact (e.g. thermal compound),

    I'd remove the processor, reseat it, and reapply thermal compound.

    The recommendations to check for bad capacitors on the motherboard is
    a good one. And, for the same reason that bad caps can cause erratic
    behavior, a problematic PSU can as well, often caused by bad caps in
    it. Or just an el-cheapo power supply. Although, while PSU problems
    are rather common with new,. high power, processors, the older
    celerons, and the graphics cards usually associated with them, pull so
    little power that PSU problems are not as common (not much stress on
    them).

    Add-on cards can cause problems with IRQ sharing; not to mention if
    one is simply defective in it's own right. Remove everything not
    needed for the bare bones operation and then add them back in, one by
    one, after it's stable.

    With a celeron on an 810 chipset the memory bus is 100MHz and some
    PC133 memories will not operate properly at 100 MHz.
     
    flipper, Feb 8, 2005
    #73
  14. I *knew* I should've saved that old mobo.

    Or possibly it's time to clean out your store room. :)
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 8, 2005
    #74
  15. I'm pretty sure I've seen enable/disable settings in BIOS. Can't see
    any reason to dialble it unless it's taken a bullet and isn't able to
    do it's job anyway.
    Yeah, someone later suggested looking for popped caps, too.
    I think people tend to take PSUs for granted; they'll buy a hip-looking
    case (mine have all been rectangular putty-colored boxes, as God
    I've never knowingly purchased a mobo with an Intel set. I'm kind of a
    Via shark.
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 8, 2005
    #75
  16. Trent SC

    Toolman Tim Guest

    | Toolman Tim wrote:
    |
    | > |
    | >| My desktop system's lineage goes back to a February 1990 Zeos (pretty
    | >| large manufacturer at the time) 386SX-16[1]. I've always done my
    | >| upgrading piece(s) by piece(s), so most of the hardware has remained
    | >| for each
    |
    | >| [1]2MB RAM (DIP packages, not xIMMs), 35MB HD.
    |
    | >Blinkster...I've got a couple of those in the storeroom still! And a
    | >ziplock bag half full of DIP memory chips!
    |
    | I *knew* I should've saved that old mobo.
    |
    | Or possibly it's time to clean out your store room. :)

    Past time...but the truck isn't running so there the stuff sits.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 8, 2005
    #76
  17. Possibly it's time to fix the truck. :)
     
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 9, 2005
    #77
  18. Trent SC

    fj Guest

    Is it not possible that there is a problem with one/some of the drivers in
    Win XP for the devices on the motherboard?

    Just to confirm, there aren't any yellow/red marks in Device Manager? Also,
    does Event Viewer show anything interesting?
     
    fj, Feb 9, 2005
    #78
  19. Trent SC

    Trent SC Guest

    I'll almost guarantee it's the PSU. They flake out more than most
    Event viewer shows nothing - this doesn't look like a software failure - the
    entire computer hangs, so the OS itself dies too. And it's an issue in both
    XP and 98se.
     
    Trent SC, Feb 9, 2005
    #79
  20. I'm tellin' ya - check the caps. It doesn't take but 5 minutes to
    open the case and look.

    I've run into this a bunch of times (twice just since Jan 1) , with
    the freezing starting as early as 5 months prior to total failure.
    It'll drive you nuts checking, replacing and reinstalling. It'll seem
    like whatever you do helps - for a little while - then it goes flaky
    again.

    M
     
    mhaase-at-springmind.com, Feb 10, 2005
    #80
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