CMOS vs CCD - why Kodak has used a CMOS sensor in a small-sensor camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David J Taylor, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. David J Taylor, Aug 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. I would question the statement that CCDs were first designed
    specifically for cameras. Wasn't the analog delay line the first use
    of CCDs? The linear array CCD came along before the 2D matrix.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Aug 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Exactly my own recollection, Don.

    What I did find interesting was the different emphasis being put on the
    reasons behind using CMOS - not because it provides a higher image
    quality, but because it makes for a cheaper system, and that the quality
    has only recently become "acceptable" for small sensors.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Aug 14, 2007
    #3
  4. Maybe they realize a policy of honesty will draw more support.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Aug 15, 2007
    #4
  5. David J Taylor

    Anoni Moose Guest

    But it could be the case. For one thing, "designed/developed" and
    "commercially
    available as a product" also are different things. :)

    Back in the days of CCD's as analog delay lines (for low cost consumer
    applications)
    I know they were built (2" wafers I think, but could have been 1") for
    camera applications
    for telescopes by Tektronix (probably as part of Teklabs, in obviously
    small quantities).
    More of a research project (Teklabs back then was much like Bell Labs
    where they did
    pure research just for the pure science of it, not product related).

    So I don't know it to be true, but CCD's as camera devices could very
    well have happened
    before analog delay line applications -- at least in the lab that made
    them originally.
     
    Anoni Moose, Aug 15, 2007
    #5
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