cisco router processors

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Tejas Kokje, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. Tejas Kokje

    Tejas Kokje Guest

    Hi,

    What type of processors (x86,MIPS etc) do CISCO routers use ?


    Regards,
    Tejas Kokje
    University of Southern California
     
    Tejas Kokje, Jul 20, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Yes.

    To go into a little more depth:

    700 Series Intel 80386SL
    800 Series Motorola PowerQUICC 8xx PowerPC core
    1000 Series Motorola Dragonball
    1600 Series Motorola Dragonball
    2500 Series Motorola 680EC30
    3100 Series Motorola 680EX30
    IGS Motorola 68020
    AGS+ Motorola 68040
    7000 Series Motorola 68040 (On RSP)
    3620 IDT Orion (MIPS 4700 clone)
    2600 Motorola PowerQUICC PowerPC
    7200 MIPS of some description
    Cat 2900 PowerPC 8xx
    1700 I believe PowerPC of some description
    7500s R4700(RSP2)R7000(RSP8) - MIPS family


    I've probably missed some that used oddballs - for example some of their
    non-router devices have used some odd things such as the MicroWebServer 100
    using an 80186.

    As you can see, they have a love of Motorola, however they use quite a lot
    of other chips around the place.

    As a rule they've used 68xxx series at the lowend, PowerPC in the mid range
    and MIPS at the high end. There are some exceptions such as the AGS which
    is due to it being a very old box.

    P.
     
    Paul S. Brown, Jul 20, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Tejas Kokje

    Sam Wilson Guest

    Depended on the vintage. We have a CGS still running (CGS, MGS, AGS
    and AGS+ all used the same boards) with a CSC/4 processor and that's a
    68040 but I think the earlier processors were 68030 or even 68020. I
    remember hearing that CSC/1 was apparently built from the same basic
    CAD layout (a Multibus or Multibus II board) as the Sun 1 workstation.
    I don't know if that was a 68000, 68010 or 68020.
    Our 3660 reports an R527x - don't recognise that one.
    R7000s in our VXRs but might be different in the earlier or later
    models.
    Cat 2950 is an RC32300 - don't recognise that either.
    Cat 3548-XL is a PowerPC403.
    Cat 3550-12G/T are reported as a generic PowerPC.
    The Cat5500 RSM is effectively an RSP2 and is therefore an R4700.

    MSFC2s seem to be R7000/SR71000 (both are reported in "show hard" - I
    assume they're members of the same family).

    In the big Cats the switching processor isn't reported - CatOS doesn't
    have the same output and when you run Supervisor IOS you're talking to
    the MSFC anyway.
    Back in the days when an AGS[+] was high end the 68K series was pretty
    hot and RISC chips of any kind were rare. Moore's Law left the AGS+
    standing, of course...

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jul 21, 2004
    #3
  4. Point - my AGS has a CSC/4 and thus the 68040 - the CSC/2 was a 68020.
    Probably another Orion MIPS clone.
    That was actually pulled from the spec sheets for the NPE200/300/400 - dunno
    about the NPE-G, but I can't imagine they'll have changed that as that
    would bugger up IOS compatibiltiy unneccesarily.


    On the other hand there's the RSM blade for the Cat 3000 series which is a
    2503 and uses a 68030. There was also an earlier RSM blade for the 5500s
    which was a 4500M on a stick - don't know what CPU it used.
    The switching processor in the big Cats is a custom chip - in the 5500s it
    was EARL, dunno about the 6500s and later.
    I wonder what would have happeneed if Cisco had decided to implement an M88k
    based router and try to max it out - lots of FDDI everywhere I suspect.

    It's interesting to compare Cisco to Extreme and Juniper - the Extreme
    Summit 48i has a Pentium 2 in it as does the Juniper M5 (at least the ones
    I played with). The Pentium is used simply to run the configuration
    interface - in the Juniper it's actually running FreeBSD. All the funky
    stuff is done in ASICs.

    Cisco are somewhat atypical in having a good few of their routers do pure
    software forwarding dependant on the CPU. This has changed with the
    later/bigger boxes starting with the SSP on the 7000s and working down the
    range to the VIPs on 7200s. The 2600s appear not to have any custom
    forwarding hardware. Nor do the 1700s. No idea about the 3700s as I've not
    had a chance to play with them yet.


    P.
     
    Paul S. Brown, Jul 21, 2004
    #4
  5. Tejas Kokje

    Steinar Haug Guest

    [Sam Wilson]

    | > As a rule they've used 68xxx series at the lowend, PowerPC in the mid range
    | > and MIPS at the high end. There are some exceptions such as the AGS which
    | > is due to it being a very old box.
    |
    | Back in the days when an AGS[+] was high end the 68K series was pretty
    | hot and RISC chips of any kind were rare. Moore's Law left the AGS+
    | standing, of course...

    It's certainly the impression that more and more of the high-end boxes
    are moving towards PowerPC based processors, e.g. PRP-2 for the 12000
    series:

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps167/products_data_sheet0900aecd800f414a.html

    and the new CRS-1:

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5763/products_data_sheet09186a008022d5f1.html

    Steinar Haug, Nethelp consulting,
     
    Steinar Haug, Jul 21, 2004
    #5
  6. The 4500M used a 100MHz IDT Orion (= MIPS R4400).
    7500s, of course. 7200s don't have VIPs.

    Regards,

    Marco.
     
    M.C. van den Bovenkamp, Jul 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Tejas Kokje

    Steinar Haug Guest

    ["Paul S. Brown"]

    | >> 7200 MIPS of some description
    | >
    | > R7000s in our VXRs but might be different in the earlier or later
    | > models.
    | >
    | That was actually pulled from the spec sheets for the NPE200/300/400 - dunno
    | about the NPE-G, but I can't imagine they'll have changed that as that
    | would bugger up IOS compatibiltiy unneccesarily.

    NPE-G1 is still MIPS based.

    | > In the big Cats the switching processor isn't reported - CatOS doesn't
    | > have the same output and when you run Supervisor IOS you're talking to
    | > the MSFC anyway.
    |
    | The switching processor in the big Cats is a custom chip - in the 5500s it
    | was EARL, dunno about the 6500s and later.

    6500s and later supervisor has a MIPS based processor *and* several ASICs.

    | It's interesting to compare Cisco to Extreme and Juniper - the Extreme
    | Summit 48i has a Pentium 2 in it as does the Juniper M5 (at least the ones
    | I played with). The Pentium is used simply to run the configuration
    | interface - in the Juniper it's actually running FreeBSD. All the funky
    | stuff is done in ASICs.

    Note that the Junipers also have a PowerPC chip in there, the so called
    "exception processor".

    | Cisco are somewhat atypical in having a good few of their routers do pure
    | software forwarding dependant on the CPU. This has changed with the
    | later/bigger boxes starting with the SSP on the 7000s and working down the
    | range to the VIPs on 7200s.

    VIP is for the 7500, and it's still software based forwarding.

    | The 2600s appear not to have any custom
    | forwarding hardware. Nor do the 1700s. No idea about the 3700s as I've not
    | had a chance to play with them yet.

    3700 is software based.

    Steinar Haug, Nethelp consulting,
     
    Steinar Haug, Jul 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Spot the person who can't tell the difference between a 7513 and a 7206. You
    are of course quite correct and I am wrong. I need to go and do some
    studying again as I stopped being handson on this size of kit just before
    dCEF was mainstreamed and have never played with PXF and its ilk.

    It's interesting to see that Cisco have started building SMP based systems
    with IOS-XR. I look forward in anticipation to the future, as Cisco appear
    to be innovating again, which they haven't really done in a while.
    Makes sense given where they are in the range and what they are being asked
    to do.

    P.
     
    Paul S. Brown, Jul 21, 2004
    #8
  9. Tejas Kokje

    Sam Wilson Guest

    Point of order, m'lud. Cisco's dedicated switch processor architecture
    started with the AGS+ and the cBus controller.

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jul 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Tejas Kokje

    Sam Wilson Guest

    You've never dropped one on your foot, have you?

    (No, neither have I, but it seemed like a good differentiator.)

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jul 21, 2004
    #10
  11. No, but I have dropped a 7507 on my foot. Thank goodness for toetectors.

    P.
     
    Paul S. Brown, Jul 21, 2004
    #11
  12. Tejas Kokje

    Sam Wilson Guest

    We had CSC/3s for a while but I can't remember whether they were 020s
    or 030s - there was something about the CSC/n numbering not reflecting
    the 680n0 numbering.

    Another data point: PIXen are PC based - don't know if the bottom end
    ones are Pentiums but the bigger ones are. The 6500/7600 FWSM (PIX
    blade) has a couple of PIIIs[1] and one, two or three[2] IBM NP4GS3
    network processors.

    [1] According to documentation I have seen (don't ask) but there's only
    mention of one in "show ver".
    [2] The same documention showed a single NP but "show xlate" for
    instance shows two NPs whereas "show console", which shows a console
    log during boot, seems to refer to three NPs.

    Sam
     
    Sam Wilson, Jul 21, 2004
    #12
  13. Program ended abnormally on 21/07/2004 09:52, Due to a catastrophic Sam Wilson
    error:
    Yep. Ye olde Pix classic was a PII 200MHz.
     
    Francois Labreque, Jul 22, 2004
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.