Certifications Worth It?

Discussion in 'MCTS' started by Kathy, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    Hello,

    I've been thinking of getting my Microsoft Software Developer
    Certifications in C# and WPF. My question is, will this be worth it?
    Do employers really care if you have these certifications? I'm seeing
    a lot of IT jobs being outsourced to India, and there seem to be fewer
    and fewer of them being posted in the US these days. I do have
    experience, but if I do get laid off I would like to have an "edge"
    over the competition.

    Thanks
     
    Kathy, Aug 19, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Well, first you need to recognize that certifications are not given in
    languages and feature sets.

    Certifications are offered based on three development classifications:
    Windows Development
    ASP.NET Development
    Enterprise Application Development
    See http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcpd.aspx#tab2 for
    details.
    I hope so! But that depends on the employer. If you find a potential
    employer looking for .NET developers and that potential employer is clueless
    about .NET developer certifications -- you might want to take a good look at
    the calibre of the existing staff you'll be developing with.
    Please do not mistake *CODING* jobs with *Development* jobs. A true
    application developer (i.e. MCPD) is involved at many stages of the
    lifecycle of an application -- and "slinging code" is but a small portion of
    that process.
    The key to having an "edge" over the "competition" is to be Good At What You
    Do.

    A second key is to have an actual portfolio of product to demonstrate to a
    potential user.

    A third key is a certification that says you understand *all* aspects of the
    development lifecycle, and not just how to write a webpage.

    Corporate America, in fact, has been slowly awakening to the fact that
    outsourcing programming to overseas cheap labor doesn't really do much to
    reduce costs -- in the end it just shifts the costs into testing/retesting,
    lost time due to time zones/datelines, multiple passes to remediate bugs,
    and less efficiency in the production of the desired result due to
    communications challenges and misunderstood specifications.


    --
    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA
    Principal/CTO, Onsite Technology Solutions, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2009)

    MS WSUS Website: http://www.microsoft.com/wsus
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
     
    Lawrence Garvin [MVP], Aug 21, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.