Canon S110

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by sja68, Oct 3, 2003.

  1. sja68

    sja68 Guest

    I am going to a wedding in a couple of weeks and would like to take
    some pictures in church and at the reception. The problem is that when
    I take pictures in low light they come out very orange. I always have
    the camera set on automatic. Can you tell me if I can put the camera
    on a different setting to correct the problem? I have never used the
    manual settings. My camera is the canon S110.

    Thanks for any help or advice.
     
    sja68, Oct 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. sja68

    Zol. Guest

    Hi, it sounds like the white balance is getting fooled - I`m not overly
    familiar with your model but if you use the manual mode available to you
    then you should find that you will be able to selct the white balance (WB)
    in one of the menus to suit your indoor shots - practice taking a few shots
    indoors under different lighting (Florescent lighting, bulb lighting etc.)
    and experiment. All is not lost with your orange photos though, If you use
    one of the better paint packages (PaintshopPro or Photoshop & Photoshop
    Elements) you will be able to `Colour-Corrct` your photos to bring back a
    more natural colour to them - just a note here though that you can only work
    with the available image and you may find that you will only be able to
    improve the image and not completely fix it.
    I hope that makes some sense, regards, Zol.
     
    Zol., Oct 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. some pictures in church and at the reception. The problem is that
    when I take pictures in low light they come out very orange. I always have
    the camera set on automatic. Can you tell me if I can put the camera on a
    different setting to correct the problem? I have never used the manual
    settings. My camera is the canon S110.

    All my FLASH pictures in low light with the S110 are orange--in fact more
    like butterscotch. I gave up taking flash pictures with the camera, except
    for anything between a few inches to about two feet away. Forget the flash.

    But my S110 is great in low light wiht the flash turned off--if held firmly
    against a hard surface (or set on a tripod; though the squarish shape of the
    camera makes it especially good for putting on a platform or jamming against
    a door frame) and then taking MULTIPLE consecutive shots by holding the
    shutter button down for several seconds (you have to set it for consecutive
    shooting; and turn the flash off). Even if it detects motion, you tend to
    get one or two shots that are just very pleasing--and sometimes you even get
    a sequence of shots that are fascinating to watch in a slide show, or to
    print in a grouping--and the color is usually good. These pictures, even if
    they can be impressionistic sometimes because of any random movement, can be
    really captivating (though I still often find it useful to color correct
    the pictures slightly--I use ICorrect software--though this is also true of
    pictures I take with the S110 in full outdoor light).

    Before you try this in a critical setting, try taking consecutive shots with
    the flash off around the house, or in other darker indoor settings--the key
    is planting the camera firmly, and not jerking it when you are holding down
    the shutter button to take three or four consecutive shots. You might still
    get one or two that are wobbly because of the pressing or holding action,
    but the results are usually very satisfying.
     
    Douglas W. Hoyt, Oct 3, 2003
    #3
  4. I have never used the manual settings. My camera is the canon S110.

    One more thing. If you go to Manual, and then turn the flash off, this
    will default the Manaual setting to "no flash". I keep mine that way all
    the time. But to shoot 'consecutive' shots, every time you power up the
    camera (or switch from 'shooting' mode to 'reviewing' pictures mode) you
    have to press the 2nd button from the left again to get it back into
    consecutive shooting mode (indicated not by one rectangle, but by overlapped
    rectangles in the indicator).
     
    Douglas W. Hoyt, Oct 3, 2003
    #4
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