Canon (especially) and Nikon are a bit boring these days

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Feb 14, 2011.

  1. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:21:24 -0500, "Pete Stavrakoglou"
    :
    : >: >> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 11:25:01 -0500, "Michael Benveniste"
    : >>
    : >>>
    : >>>> You're hitting a bit close to home there, Buddy. I happen to be on my
    : >>>> sixth
    : >>>> silver or gray car. It's a Kia, but the first two were a Porsche and a
    : >>>> Dodge
    : >>>> Super Bee.
    : >>>
    : >>>My wife and I own two cars. One of them is an all-wheel drive,
    : >>>silver compact station wagon that looks like a zombiemobile to the
    : >>>casual observer. If they get close enough, they might wonder about
    : >>>the stick shift, though.
    : >>>
    : >>>Yes, we could have bought it in fly yellow or a brilliant blue. But
    : >>>the fact that the car can do 0-60 in 6.0 seconds, comfortably cruise
    : >>>at 130+ mph,
    : >>
    : >> Where, in the US, could you utilize this feature? Boston roundabouts
    : >> are the only place I've ever seen a car going anything approaching
    : >> that speed.
    : >>
    : >> The zero-to-60 claim would be useful to escape carjackers, but it's
    : >> much easier to avoid areas where carjackers lurk. I suppose it would
    : >> be useful when accelerating from a green light to change lanes, but
    : >> given that several cars from the other direction will be going through
    : >> their yellow, and even red, it's not something I'd try.
    : >
    : >Why does it have to be "useful"? :)
    :
    : I kinda like useful features if I'm paying for the features. But, I
    : do understand buying something just because you want it no matter what
    : the cost if you can afford it. Not, in my case, any kind of
    : automobile, though.
    :
    : The only car I've ever longed for is a 1950s XK-120 Jaguar open top,
    : but that will wait until I can afford a live-in mechanic and a tow
    : truck follow car. I don't care how fast it goes; I just want to sit
    : in it.

    When I was growing up in Mississippi in the 1950s, one of the wealthier men in
    town had a Duesenberg, one of those large 4-door convertible touring cars,
    brown with a tan canvas roof. It was, quite simply, the most beautiful
    automobile I have ever seen. Then one day he sold it and bought a Jaguar
    (XK-120?) 2-seat sports car. My brother and I assumed, in all seriousness,
    that he had gone insane.

    Wandering slightly further OT (since I don't think I ever photographed any of
    these cars), the second prettiest car in town was a late-40s navy blue Lincoln
    Continental V-12 (lonnng, with jump seats in the back). It was owned by a
    black undertaker who was rumored to be the richest man in town. In those days
    of the segregated south, there were restaurants and bars that he couldn't
    enter - but he could probably have bought the buildings that housed them.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 23, 2011
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  2. RichA

    tony cooper Guest

    The "classic" Lincoln was the 1941 Lincoln Continental. The V-12 was
    used between 1940 and 1948, but they were not produced during the war.
    http://tinyurl.com/4mx4yod
     
    tony cooper, Feb 23, 2011
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  3. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 15:29:20 -0500, tony cooper <>
    : >wrote:
    : >: On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:21:24 -0500, "Pete Stavrakoglou"
    : >:
    : >: >: >: >> On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 11:25:01 -0500, "Michael Benveniste"
    : >: >>
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>>> You're hitting a bit close to home there, Buddy. I happen to be on my
    : >: >>>> sixth
    : >: >>>> silver or gray car. It's a Kia, but the first two were a Porsche and a
    : >: >>>> Dodge
    : >: >>>> Super Bee.
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>>My wife and I own two cars. One of them is an all-wheel drive,
    : >: >>>silver compact station wagon that looks like a zombiemobile to the
    : >: >>>casual observer. If they get close enough, they might wonder about
    : >: >>>the stick shift, though.
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>>Yes, we could have bought it in fly yellow or a brilliant blue. But
    : >: >>>the fact that the car can do 0-60 in 6.0 seconds, comfortably cruise
    : >: >>>at 130+ mph,
    : >: >>
    : >: >> Where, in the US, could you utilize this feature? Boston roundabouts
    : >: >> are the only place I've ever seen a car going anything approaching
    : >: >> that speed.
    : >: >>
    : >: >> The zero-to-60 claim would be useful to escape carjackers, but it's
    : >: >> much easier to avoid areas where carjackers lurk. I suppose it would
    : >: >> be useful when accelerating from a green light to change lanes, but
    : >: >> given that several cars from the other direction will be going through
    : >: >> their yellow, and even red, it's not something I'd try.
    : >: >
    : >: >Why does it have to be "useful"? :)
    : >:
    : >: I kinda like useful features if I'm paying for the features. But, I
    : >: do understand buying something just because you want it no matter what
    : >: the cost if you can afford it. Not, in my case, any kind of
    : >: automobile, though.
    : >:
    : >: The only car I've ever longed for is a 1950s XK-120 Jaguar open top,
    : >: but that will wait until I can afford a live-in mechanic and a tow
    : >: truck follow car. I don't care how fast it goes; I just want to sit
    : >: in it.
    : >
    : >When I was growing up in Mississippi in the 1950s, one of the wealthier men in
    : >town had a Duesenberg, one of those large 4-door convertible touring cars,
    : >brown with a tan canvas roof. It was, quite simply, the most beautiful
    : >automobile I have ever seen. Then one day he sold it and bought a Jaguar
    : >(XK-120?) 2-seat sports car. My brother and I assumed, in all seriousness,
    : >that he had gone insane.
    : >
    : >Wandering slightly further OT (since I don't think I ever photographed any of
    : >these cars), the second prettiest car in town was a late-40s navy blue Lincoln
    : >Continental V-12 (lonnng, with jump seats in the back). It was owned by a
    : >black undertaker who was rumored to be the richest man in town. In those days
    : >of the segregated south, there were restaurants and bars that he couldn't
    : >enter - but he could probably have bought the buildings that housed them.
    :
    : The "classic" Lincoln was the 1941 Lincoln Continental. The V-12 was
    : used between 1940 and 1948, but they were not produced during the war.
    : http://tinyurl.com/4mx4yod

    I seem to recall that the one at issue was a '46, but in retrospect I haven't
    the least idea how I would have known that. I did see it in a shop with the
    hood open once; that's how I know it was a V-12. (A friend of my mother's had
    a Lincoln Zephyr. That one said "V-12" on the hood.)

    A curious feature of Lincolns of that vintage was that the outside door latch
    was just a round button with no handle. Even in Vicksburg it got well below
    freezing. What would you do if you managed to push the button but the door was
    still frozen shut? Pry it open with a crowbar?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 23, 2011
  4. RichA

    PeterN Guest


    If he really doesn't insure his car, it shows the same amount of social
    responsibility as he demonstrates with his postings.
     
    PeterN, Feb 24, 2011
  5. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    A garage and chauffeur made that a non-issue.
     
    PeterN, Feb 24, 2011
  6. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    Or running boards and a wrap around windshield, perhaps?
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  7. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    Rich wrote:

    The 1970's decade was the nadir of U.S. car styling, in my view. Ugly,
    big and boxy brutes prevailed, during that (thankfully) bygone era.

    Good riddance to those automotive abominations, I say!
    Your "tastes" are quite revealing, Cap'n Canuck.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  8. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    Peter N wrote:

    <edited>

    Oh, so, you demolished a 1937 Cord? One of the greatest specimens in
    automotive history (and a true American classic), became the victim
    of a senseless act of thrill-seeking satisfaction and irresponsibile
    behavior, on your part?

    Car-wrecker! Fiend! Speed demon! Daredevil!

    Wny, I'm even ashamed to share the same newsgroup, with a person of
    your ilk.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  9. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    Savageduck wrote:


    Unlike other luxury cars (e.g., Cadillac, Packard, et al.),
    which were relative slowpokes, Duesenbergs and Cords were
    potent performers. (Their racing heritage separated them
    from their contemporaries.)

    Thus, "souping up" wasn't required.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  10. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    Savageduck wrote:

    Ralph Nader did a hatchet-job on the poor Corvair.
    Kewl!
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  11. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    During the 1997-2003 period, somebody calling himself "Mothman" was
    a prodigious poster, to <
    (18,546 articles.)
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  12. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    On the flip side, getting a "gear in ass" would be rather painful, and
    could require surgery.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  13. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    Could OLED technology allow EVF's, to finally deliver the death blow to
    OVF's?

    And/or, might LED back-lit LCD panels (of the type used in TV sets) be
    miniaturized and adapted to digital cameras, one day?
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  14. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    "Ask the man who owns one" (famous Packard advertising slogan of the 1930's).
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  15. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    Then, there was Wayne Boring (1905-1987)...an American comic book artist,
    mostly noted as Superman's illustrator (1940's-1950's).
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  16. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    My own Kodak P850 "super zoom" displays this "scintillation" phenomenon,
    occasionally (and it's hardly a "current" model, debuting in 2005 and
    out of production, since 2007).

    Sometimes, I notice it when I'm taking shots of purchased items (from
    eBay, etc.), for documentation purposes. (I always use auto-focus and
    the camera's LCD, instead of its EVF.)

    Although, I'm still unaware of what "scintillation" really does, to
    help me.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  17. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    Excepting the full-frame arena, Pentax >does< offer DSLR bodies that are
    quite comparable to Canon's and Nikon's.

    The other primary players (Sony, Olympus and Panasonic) have seemingly
    abandoned true DSLR's, however.
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  18. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    Rich wrote:


    There's no real need to publicly incriminate yourself, Rich.

    (Besides, smokimg is a very unhealthy and disgusting habit.)
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  19. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    PeterN wrote:


    For a teenager to afford a Cord (like my rhyme?), you must have sold tons
    of newspapers, and/or robbed several banks.

    So, tell me, you rascally desperado...what was John Dillinger really like?
    Did he ever carve a "camera" out of a bar of soap, and cover it with black
    shoe polish?
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
  20. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    Rich destroyed his drivers license (he was appalled that it was
    laminated in plastic).
     
    John Turco, Feb 28, 2011
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