Canon 20D / Studio Lighting Question ???

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Joey, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. Joey

    Joey Guest

    Hi All,

    I have the Canon 20D and want to set up an indoor studio. I plan on
    getting the two softboxes w/strobes and a rear fill strobe. I know the
    Canon 20D has the speedlite built in but my question is what does it
    take to fire the remote studio strobes ? I recently noticed in another
    studio using Olympus cameras they had some sort of trigger wireless
    transmitter on the hot shoe. Any comments or suggestions would be
    appreciated as this will be my first indoor studio. Thanks

    Joey
     
    Joey, Dec 12, 2005
    #1
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  2. Joey

    peter Guest

    PC cords. No need to use wireless remote inside a studio.
    In my case, if I have more than one strobe, I connect one directly to the
    camera using a PC cord, then set up the others as slaves (they have built-in
    photo sensors).
     
    peter, Dec 12, 2005
    #2
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  3. Joey

    Steve Wolfe Guest

    I have the Canon 20D and want to set up an indoor studio. I plan on
    I throw my flash on the camera, and turn the power down to 1/64 or 1/128,
    and use that to trigger the optical slaves. It's a bit more weight to hold,
    but that's offset by not having any cords. A wireless setup would be even
    nicer, but a lot more expensive - I already had the flash, so I don't count
    that in the cost.

    steve
     
    Steve Wolfe, Dec 12, 2005
    #3
  4. Joey

    Dirty Harry Guest

    Am I correct in thinking that you need a manual flash on a 20d for this to
    prevent the strobes from going off too soon? What flash are you using?
    Could anyone recommend a dirt cheap flash that has manual and works on a
    20d?
     
    Dirty Harry, Dec 12, 2005
    #4
  5. Joey

    Paul Rubin Guest

    You could get digital optical slaves, or else use wired remotes.

    http://porters.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=130577
     
    Paul Rubin, Dec 12, 2005
    #5
  6. Joey

    george Guest

    Just be careful on the sync voltages with a PC cord...I've heard that Canon
    has a maximum sync voltage of 6V and some modern studio flash is higher
    than that...use a Wein safe sync if you need to or are uncertain. Luckily,
    my Nikon D70 has a max sync voltage over 150V (I believe it is 250V but
    am not going to look it up) so it is fine with my Bowens 15V sync flashes.
    It'd be a real shame to fry your camera's electronics.
     
    george, Dec 12, 2005
    #6
  7. Joey

    Tesco News Guest


    The Wireless remote system is very good, and they are not nearly as
    expensive, as you might think. Just put the Sender on the hotshoe, and the
    receiver into one of the Jacks on a Strobe.

    The other Strobes will probably have built in Slave Switches, which will
    fire them when the Wirelessly controlled one Fires. If the Strobes don't
    have Slaves, then Plug in ones can easily be bought, or they can be linked
    by Cable.

    OR 1. Using any cheap little, very low powered, Flash on Camera, ideally
    with it aimed at the ceiling, should enable the Slaves to fire the Strobes.

    OR 2. Use the Built In Camera Flash, set to its lowest Power setting, and
    to Manual. This is the least best option, because it may put some light
    into any area you want to stay very dark.

    In all cases all Flashes, and the Camera will need to operate in Maunual
    Mode, and a Flash Meter then becomes an almost indispensable tool.

    Roy G
     
    Tesco News, Dec 12, 2005
    #7
  8. Joey

    Steve Wolfe Guest

    Am I correct in thinking that you need a manual flash on a 20d for this to
    Yes, you need a manual flash to be able to turn down the power, so that it
    won't affect the exposure. I use a Sigma 500 DG Super in manual mode. It's
    not dirt-cheap, I have it for general use, and triggering strobes with it is
    just a bonus.

    steve
     
    Steve Wolfe, Dec 12, 2005
    #8
  9. Joey

    Paul Guest

    What about continuous lighting?
     
    Paul, Dec 14, 2005
    #9
  10. Joey

    Joey Guest

    Paul,

    I'm not sure I understand what you mean here ??

    Joey
     
    Joey, Dec 14, 2005
    #10
  11. Joey

    Chip Gallo Guest

    The Alienbees vendor site has an extensive FAQ area that helps with
    setup questions. I have a 20D also and was thinking that I could use the
    PC terminal connection (page 98 of the instruction manual) or trigger
    the other flashes with the Canon flash.

    http://www.alienbees.com/

    Chip Gallo
     
    Chip Gallo, Dec 15, 2005
    #11
  12. Joey

    Paul Guest

    Same as a 'flash' set-up, but the lights are continuously on. Similar to
    what is used for shooting video.
     
    Paul, Dec 15, 2005
    #12
  13. Joey

    Dirty Harry Guest

    I would stay away from that for the amount of light they put out. I've gone
    the hot light way and after screwing around trying everything I could to get
    more light out of them decided I needed more power or I would never get
    babies with flailing arms to freeze. Ordered my first alien bee yesterday.
    I had to shoot iso 400 and 1/60th, f5.6 Almost no DOF and if the subject
    isn't perfectly still forget it...Looking forward to being able to get the
    camera off the tripod and stopping down a bit with the strobes.
    www.harryphotos.com/babysanta1.jpg
    www.harryphotos.com/babysanta2.jpg
    that was with hotlights, but like I said every 3/5 pics had blurry moving
    hands....
     
    Dirty Harry, Dec 15, 2005
    #13
  14. Joey

    Paul Guest

    F5.6. What if you have a bigger aperture lens?
     
    Paul, Dec 15, 2005
    #14
  15. Joey

    Dirty Harry Guest

    Then I have almost no DOF as I shoot pretty close, I did those baby shots at
    around 3.2 I think cause I had no other choice but it still didn't gain me
    enough speed to get rid of the arm blur. Not only that but the hot light
    had to be at point blank range. With the strobes I'm looking forward to
    getting the lights a little further back (serious flare problems with the
    umbrellas out in front of the camera). Forget about trying to light a whole
    family with the hot light (been there, done that, failed...) It's not that
    they can't take good pictures, its just that the % of good shots will be
    higher if you have more to work with IMHO.
     
    Dirty Harry, Dec 16, 2005
    #15
  16. Joey

    Dirty Harry Guest

    And even goign from 5.6 to 2.8 is still only going to get me 1/60 at iso
    200, I want iso 100, 1/250th and f8 :).
     
    Dirty Harry, Dec 16, 2005
    #16
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