Cannot erase DVD-RW

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Terry Pinnell, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. Yes, I have amassed quite a few programs and utilities capable of
    writing to DVD-RWs. Half of them in the last few days, and quite a few
    from recommendations here:
    ahead Nero
    CloneDVD2
    DeepBurner Pro
    DivxToDVD
    DVD Decrypter
    DVD Identifier
    DVD Shrink
    Eazy VCD 1.15a
    EO Video
    IsoBuster
    Super Blank
    Super DVD Creator8.55
    VCD Menu Lite 1.0
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 4, 2005
    #21
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  2. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest

    You can install all of the CD/DVD burning applications on a given
    Windows system as you wish without causing a problem as long as the
    applications in question either a) don't install their own drivers or
    b) install drivers which don't happen to conflict with any
    already-installed drivers.

    From the list of applications that you've listed, I am only familiar
    with Nero, DVD Decrypter, and IsoBuster. Of those three, only Nero
    installs drivers on your system. There is, therefore, no conflict
    created when having Nero, DVD Decrypter, and IsoBuster all
    simultaneously installed on a single system. That said, however, I
    would never attempt to actually *run* any more than one of these three
    applications at once. In other words, it's perfectly okay to have all
    three of these applications simultaneously *installed*, but don't ever
    *run* more than one of them at a time.

    If you suspect that driver conflicts may be causing a problem on your
    system, and I wouldn'd rule out that possibility, I'd suggest that you
    run a program, included with the Nero package, called Nero InfoTool.
    In a typical installation of the full retail version of Nero 6 Ultra
    Edition, it will be installed at the following location.

    C:\Program Files\Ahead\Nero Toolkit\InfoTool.exe

    If you don't see a Shortcut to the Nero InfoTool program on your Start
    menu, then launch Windows Explorer, browse to the directory listed
    above, and double-click on the InfoTool.exe file to run it.

    If you seem not to have the Nero InfoTool program installed on your
    system, you can get a free copy by using the Download link on the
    following Web page.

    http://ww2.nero.com/enu/Info_Tool.html

    When Nero InfoTool is up-and-running, you'll see seven tabs: Drive,
    Disc, Configuration, Software, Drivers, Hardware, and ASPI. The
    Software, Drivers, and ASPI tabs will show you what's installed on
    your system. You can use this information to help determine whether
    it's likely you're experiencing a driver conflict.

    I'd also like to mention that if you don't do packet writing, you may
    want to disable Nero InCD from launching whenever you boot your
    system. This is easy to do using the System Configuration Utility
    program included with Windows. Just go to Start | Run... | enter
    "msconfig.exe" (without the quotation marks, of course) and click the
    'OK' button (or hit the Enter key on your keyboard). When the program
    is up-and-running, you'll see a number of tabs including one called
    'Startup'. Click on the Startup tab and you'll see a partial list of
    the items which get launched every time you boot your system. If you
    see InCD listed, and its checkbox has a checkmark (tick) in it,
    disable it by clearing the checkbox, then click the 'Apply' and 'OK'
    buttons, and re-boot your system for the change to become effective.

    When you re-boot you may receive a dialog box reminding you that
    you're using MSConfig to change your system's configuration (or some
    wording to that effect). You may want to check the box that says
    "Don't show me this message again", or some words to that effect, as
    there's no need to be reminded of this every time you boot the
    machine. Remember, you can always re-run the MSConfig program and
    re-enable any item that you've previously disabled. Also, when you're
    in the Startup tab within the System Configuration Utility (MSConfig)
    program, please don't disable any items with which you're not
    familiar, as this may, in the worst-case scenario, actually prevent
    your system from booting--and we certainly wouldn't want that
    happening as it's difficult for me to make house calls to West Sussex.
    :)

    P.S. Did you run a surface scan on your bad DVD-RW discs in IsoBuster
    and if so, did it report any errors?
     
    Frank, Oct 4, 2005
    #22
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  3. Thanks for another extremely helpful post - greatly appreciate your
    help and patience.

    As you may have seen, I've also opened a new thread 'Is Nero Express
    ruining my DVD-RWs?', as my problems have now gone beyond erasing
    difficulties.

    I have Nero Info and have been using it methodically on my 10 DVD-RWs,
    now a motley mixture best described as Good, Bad and Don't Know!

    I'm presently tabulating key information about each of the DVD-RW
    discs, and may post it tomorrow for possible discussion. But meanwhile
    I can say the results are very odd. 4 of the 10 discs play OK on both
    my lounge DVD player and on my PC with Power DVD. 2 of the 10 play in
    the lounge but are reported Blank by Nero Info and do not play in
    Power DVD or Nero ShowTime. Yet they *do* play in BS Player!
    http://www.bsplayer.com
    (FWIW, these 2 contain a single MPG, made with MemoriesOnTV, which is
    where most of the disc's contents were made.)

    More later.

    --
    Terry, West Sussex, UK
    Tue 4 October 2005, 20:58 UK time




    Playable on: Extracts, Nero Info & DVD Info Pro
    ---------------------------- ----------------------------------
    Lounge
    DVD Play on PC with: File
    # Player Power DVD BS Player System(s) Disc Status etc
    -- ------ --------- --------- ---------- -----------------------
    #1 No No Yes ISO9660, UDF 'Blank', 'Not DVD-Video'
    This contains a single 1 minute MPG I burned with Nero Express).
    Not accessible to Windows Explorer. ('V:\ is not accessible. Incorrect
    function'.)

    #2 Yes No Yes
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 4, 2005
    #23
  4. Terry Pinnell

    Bruce Tyler Guest

    Had similar problem with DvD+RW...

    I was writing to a +RW disc in this very laptop when I got a write
    error. The DvD simply did not finsh writing and I ejected it. I put
    the disc back in and it gave an error upon loading so I put it aside
    and tried another. The same thing happened. At first I thought it was
    Nero 6613 (I was using at the time - and still do) which was at
    fault. I quit the program and left it until I got home and tried the
    same thing on my desktop PC, using the same version of Nero. This time
    it worked, BUT , I had used another, previously unused +RW and all
    worked perfectly. I then put in one of the failed write discs and it
    failed to write again. Now this had me scratching my head. Both of the
    failed write discs, failed to load. They also failed to format in
    Nero. I tried a handful of other programs to format but all failed,
    giving write error and a host of other "failure" messages. I put these
    +RW's aside and tried another on the laptop. Now I had three stuffed
    +RW's...

    Hmmmmm...!!!

    About 3 weeks later ( a month ago) I bought a Sony RDR-HX910 DvD
    recorder and I decided to try one of these +RW's. If that failed I was
    going to throw them out. I inserted and up came the message "Unkown
    Disc" so I formatted it manually. It appeared to work. Ahah... I then
    recorded a movie to one of them and yes, it copied. I then took it out
    and put in into my PC DvD drive and tried to play the movie. It failed
    to see any movie. I then put it into my Panasonic DvD player and it
    gave disc load failure. I then put it back into the Sony HX910 and
    tried to play it and it too gave a failure...

    Those 3 +RW's are now in the rubbish bin....

    BUT... What caused the original failure... It was on" this" laptop.
    The DvD burner burner has failed. It does not work any more. The
    yellow burn LED is always on and it wont read or write any DvD or CD,
    so it is knackered....

    I have bought hundreds of RW's, both +RW and -RW and many +/-R's too
    and one or two which fall by the wayside are not going to bother me,
    so any failures will get tossed out straight away...
     
    Bruce Tyler, Oct 4, 2005
    #24
  5. Terry Pinnell

    Justin Guest

    Bruce Tyler wrote on [Wed, 05 Oct 2005 09:59:25 +1300]:
    Maybe you should try a DVD+RW then.
     
    Justin, Oct 4, 2005
    #25
  6. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest


    I hope that Terry reads this, because it may just be what's happening
    to him, although I'd still like to see the results of an IsoBuster
    Surface Scan.

    I would also suggest to Terry that he disable any active anti-virus
    software that may be running in the background on his system, at least
    when he's burning DVDs. He can always re-enable it when he's done
    burning. This is in addition to the recommendation that I made
    previously with regard to disabling of InCD at system startup,
    assuming that he's not doing any packet writing.

    I'm also, based upon his latest posts, wondering whether he's burning
    his DVD-RW discs in DVD-ROM (data) format or DVD-Video format.
     
    Frank, Oct 5, 2005
    #26
  7. Yes, still reading every reply I get studiously thanks Frank!

    I only got around to doing the first surface scan this morning (it's
    lunchtime here now) as I was unsure which of my 10 DVD-RW discs would
    be the best initial candidate. I chose #9, which was unplayable on
    both lounge DVD player and PC with PowerDVD. Nero Info says "Open. Not
    finalized." At the end of the (long) scan I got this:
    ---------
    [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]

    Number of errors encountered on the disc : 2297888

    This is a packet written disc. Errors are not abnormal on this disc.
    To see if files are affected, look for the 'error' icon next to files
    or :
    Select a File System of your choice and select :

    List files with read errors (in Edit Window)
    ---------

    I don't see how to do implement that last instruction? Can't see an
    'Edit' window anywhere... (Mind you, not sure 2.3M errors would make
    pleasant reading!) The IsoBuster Help says
    "The list with erroneous files can always be recreated without the
    necessity to redo the scan. Just select the File System icon and
    create the list via 'Directory tree and file information' "
    But how do I reach that? All I see in the left pane (when expanded)
    is:
    DVD-RW
    Open Session 1
    Track 01
    So where is 'Directory tree and file information' please?
    Anyway, is that huge number of errors the likely cause of my problems
    with that *particular* disc? Does this tell me anything about *how*
    these errors got onto the disc? Of course, I wasn't being as
    methodical 2 days ago as I'm trying to be now, but I *think* all I did
    on it was use Nero Express to 'Erase disc'.

    Although it ties up the drive for so long, maybe I should now do
    another surface scan with a 'good' identical disc?
    Thanks, have now done both those before further tests.
    This is a murky area for me, so please bear with me! I've been doing
    *both*, and perhaps that's causing or at least contributing to my
    problems? Basically, I've been repeating operations from a very
    limited repertoire:

    1. In Nero Express: Erase disc.
    That doesn't ask me what is on the disc, what I want to do with it, or
    anything else. I'm assuming it should simply do what it says on the
    can: ERASE everything, so that I have an empty, spanking new DVD-RW to
    work on?

    2. In Nero Express: Burn a single data file.
    This was chosen for maximum speed and simplicity

    3. In my DVD 'authoring' program, MemoriesOnTV: Either create a video
    and store it on HD (VOB etc), or do that and also burn it to DVD.
    That was the source of the content on most of the DVD-RWs I tried to
    Erase. In fact, on first trying to burn from MoT onto an existing
    video, there is always a message asking if I want to erase the disc
    first. Every time I did so on those I tried, it failed and aborted.
    That's why I turned to Nero Express to erase - and that failed too.
    One other complication I'll mention in case it's relevant is that Mot
    offers an option on burning to 'Use Nero Drivers'. I'm unable to be
    sure for all discs which did use that. I can say that the last couple
    I did for tests (just making a 'movie' from a single JPG) were with
    the proprietary MoT drivers.
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 5, 2005
    #27
  8. Wow, that second scan was fast! Loaded #8, which is a 'good' one, i,e.
    one I have not yet tried to Erase (or burn data) with Nero Express.
    After making myself a coffee, this message awaited:

    ---------
    [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]
    No physical errors encountered. Your disc is still in good shape.
    ---------

    OK, while I'm on a roll, let's try #10. That's one of the two which
    will play on my lounge DVD player but not on my PC with PowerDVD
    (which says 'No disc in drive V:') or Nero ShowTime - but does play in
    BS Player. Seems bizarre to me, but no doubt light will dawn soon!

    OK, IsoBuster says it's a 'Blank DVD-RW'. And, logically enough I
    suppose, the Surface Scan option is not accessible.

    Just to be sure, closed IsoBuster, loaded BS Player, and played it. 43
    secs of video and audio. BS window says:
    LEDSequencer6MB.mpg
    00:00:00 / 00:00:43 Movie size: 320x240 @ 25

    So how can it be an empty disc?!

    More important, should I now be able to do any of the above operations
    with it? If for example I Erase it in Nero Express, that should cause
    no problem?
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 5, 2005
    #28
  9. FWIW, here's a summary of the methodical tests I did with 10 identical
    brand DVD-RW discs, numbered #1 to #10.

    #1 BAD
    Contents = Short MPG movie (video/audio)
    Lounge DVD player? NO
    PC PowerDVD? NO
    IsoBuster displays: Open Session 1
    Track 01 0 4.38 GB
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: About 48,000 errors when canceled at 2%

    #2 BAD?
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Family tree
    Lounge DVD player? YES
    PC PowerDVD? NO
    IsoBuster displays: Open Session 1
    Track 01 0 4.38 GB
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: About 46,000 errors when canceled at 2%
    Question: Why can it play in lounge without any apparent flaws?

    #3 GOOD?
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Competa; Les Estables
    Lounge DVD player? YES
    PC PowerDVD? YES
    Surface scan results: [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]
    No physical errors encountered. Your disc is still in good shape.

    #4 BAD
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Cologne
    Lounge DVD player? YES (recheck quality)
    PC PowerDVD? YES but keeps stopping
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: Large number, but froze at 93%

    #5 BAD
    Contents = Short MPG movie (video/audio) LED circuit demo
    Lounge DVD player? NO
    PC PowerDVD? NO
    IsoBuster displays: Open Session 1
    Track 01 0 4.38 GB
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: 46 errors, but sort of froze at 31%, so
    unreliable result.

    #6 GOOD?
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Cologne
    Lounge DVD player? YES
    PC PowerDVD? YES
    Surface scan results: [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]
    No physical errors encountered. Your disc is still in good shape.

    #7 GOOD?
    Contents = Blank
    Lounge DVD player? NO
    PC PowerDVD? NO
    IsoBuster displays: Track 01
    0 0.00 KB 0
    Surface scan results: [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]
    No physical errors encountered. Your disc is still in good shape.

    #8 GOOD
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Ethan 1st 6 Months
    Lounge DVD player? YES
    PC PowerDVD? YES
    Surface scan results: [DVD-RW:RITEK000V11A]
    No physical errors encountered. Your disc is still in good shape.

    #9 BAD
    Contents =
    Lounge DVD player? NO
    PC PowerDVD? NO
    IsoBuster displays: Open Session 1
    Track 01 0 4.38 GB
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: About 48,000 errors when canceled at 2%

    #10 BAD?
    Contents = MoT movie (video/audio) Italian Holiday (draft 1)
    Lounge DVD player? YES
    PC PowerDVD? NO (There's a brief flash of the OLD over-writen menu,
    not seen on lounge player.)
    IsoBuster displays: Open Session 1
    Track 01 0 4.38 GB
    Surface scan initial message: "This is a packet written disc. Errors
    are not abnormal..."
    Surface scan results: (POSTPONED)
    Question: Why can it play in lounge without any apparent flaws?
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 5, 2005
    #29
  10. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest

    In my opinion, this disc looks like a candidate for the trash can,
    sorry to say, although I don't use packet writing (Nero InCD).
    I know, it's a little confusing. Also, I'm using a registered paid
    version of the program and you are, I assume, using the unregistered
    free version and I'm not certain of all of the differences between the
    two, but I believe that if you go in to view individual sectors on the
    disc, that's the "Edit Window" to which the message is referring.
    Maybe I've just been lucky, but I've *never* encountered a disc with
    that number of errors, ever.
    It's talking, I believe, about the program's ability to save the error
    list as a text file on your hard disk for possible future reference,
    thus avoiding the need to re-scan the disc again in the future.
    Personally, I'm willing to take the extra time and let it re-scan, so
    I never save the information.
    Try right-clicking on *everything* in the user interface. IsoBuster is
    one of those programs which just loves the right mouse button, so much
    so, in fact, that if I spend some time in IsoBuster and then switch to
    another, more conventionally-written application, I have to
    consciously remind myself that right-clicking on anything in sight
    won't necessarily bring up a context menu. :)
    I would be inclined to believe that, yes. It's not impossible, you
    know, that you were simply unfortunate enough to get a bad batch of
    discs--or even ones which simply don't play well with your particular
    drive and/or your drive's firmware level. In fact, it might be useful
    to Google your drive's make and model and see if any firmware updates
    are available for it. It certainly wouldn't be the first time that a
    firmware update has fixed problems like this.
    Not that I can see, no, but I don't claim to be a DVD-RW burning
    expert, either.
    I would definitely do that, yes. Personally, for important work, I do
    an IsoBuster Surface Scan right after I burn a disc.
    As long as you can trust yourself to always remember to re-enable the
    anti-virus software afterwards, I would recommend that you always
    disable it prior to working with any video-related projects.
    In my opinion, it's *really* important to choose the correct sort of
    formatting when working with any recordable (-R or +R) or re-writable
    (-RW or +RW) optical media. If you were burning a CD-R disc, for
    example, the two most commonly used formats would be as a data
    (CD-ROM) disc or as a Redbook audio CD (CDDA). There's a world of
    difference between the two formats. With burnable DVD formats, you
    have similar choices to make.

    Burn in DVD-Video format, for example, if your intent is to create a
    disc which is to be played back in a televison-set-attached DVD player
    (in which case you'll need to have authored the disc prior to burning
    it and the disc will have a VIDEO_TS folder containing .vob and other
    special file types). Burn in DVD-ROM (data) format when you simply
    want to put files, of whatever type (.avi, .mpg, .wav, .mp3, .pdf,
    ..doc. gif, .jpg, .txt, etc.), on the disc for use in a
    computer-attached DVD drive.

    Maybe it will help to think of the DVD-Video formatted disc as the
    video equivalent of a Redbook audio CD and the DVD-ROM data-formatted
    DVD disc as the functional equivalent (but with greater storage
    capacity) of the CD-ROM disc.

    And let's not even mention the -VR and +VR formats, please, where you
    can perform limited re-authoring of the disc, or the DVD-Audio or SACD
    formats with LPCM or DSD encoded to MLP. Or those little mini-discs
    used in some low-end consumer camcorders which sometimes record MPEG-2
    and sometimes, I believe, record some flavor of MPEG-4 video. Then
    there's single layer and double (dual) layer and single-sided and
    double-sided. Then we have the different file systems used on DVDs --
    ISO 9660 and UDF, the latter of which comes in multiple versions.
    Let's not forget DVD-RAM. And then there's single session versus
    multi-session, the latter of which is what you want to use on
    re-writable DVD media when you plan to came along later and add to or
    delete from an existing compilation or erase and start over with a new
    compilation.

    And whatever happened to DVD-18 discs? If they were ever widely used,
    we wouldn't need HD DVD discs or Blu-ray Discs (BD) to store high-def
    video content, assuming MPEG-4 Part 10 AVC H.264 (or VC-1) encoding.

    (Sorry for the rambling.)

    A review of the DVD Demystified DVD FAQ should help - just be sure to
    set aside an evening to digest all of the information. :)

    DVD FAQ
    http://www.dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html
     
    Frank, Oct 5, 2005
    #30
  11. Thanks Frank, much to study there. I'll get into it tomorrow.

    Please see my detailed IsoBuster test results in my other thread, 'Is
    Nero Express ruining my DVD-RWs?'
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 5, 2005
    #31
  12. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest

    I've been looking forward to this...
    Bad disc. Scrap it. And stop using packet writing, please.
    Bad disc, or at least marginal. Close the session and re-test in
    IsoBuster. What sort of player (make and model) do you have in the
    lounge? Also, how much drinking do you do in the lounge, as that may
    have a bearing on the results? (Just kidding about the drinking
    question.)
    Sounds like a good disc to me. Would it be correct for me to say that
    this disc ia a) finalized (or was perhaps not multi-session to begin
    with) and b) wasn't packet-written?
    Sounds like another bad disc. And stop using packet writing, please.
    Sounds like another bad disc. And stop using packet writing, please.
    Looks to me like a good disc.
    Looks like a good unused disc, or one that was used and then
    successfully erased.
    Looks like another good disc. If you want to keep it that way, do not
    attempt to write any additional data to it, although I suspect that it
    didn't begin life as a multi-session disc anyway, but that's just a
    guess.
    Bad disc, or at least marginal. Close the session and re-test in
    IsoBuster.
    It plays in your Lounge DVD player because that player is using
    somewhat different logic than the PowerDVD player program on your PC.
    This isn't much different a situation than the playback
    incompatibilities that one normally encounters when playing burned
    DVD-Video discs on different (telly-attached) set top DVD players.

    In summary, although I think that you may have gotten some bad discs
    in your package of ten, I also think that some of the problems you're
    seeing could have been avoided by finding an author/burn procedure
    which works in your particular setup and sticking to it. Also, I would
    suggest not using packet writing. It's simply not reliable on some
    systems. Also, if you happen to have any other standalone DVD players
    in the house, or any other computers with DVD drives (even if they are
    just DVD-ROM drives and not writers) test all important discs in them
    as well before you consider a given project to be complete and delete
    the original source files.

    It's some extra work, but when I have an important DVD-Video disc to
    give to someone, I test it in three different standalone DVD players
    and two different computer DVD drives. Also, I burn two copies of the
    material, one on DVD-R media and another on DVD+R media, to help
    increase the probability that the recipient will be able to
    successfully play the disc, or at least one of them. I also test both
    discs in IsoBuster to ensure that they are error free. I do this in
    two different DVD drives. I test DVD-ROM (data) discs as well, using
    the same procedures as above, except not in standalone DVD players, of
    course.

    HTH.
     
    Frank, Oct 6, 2005
    #32
  13. OK, done.
    You've jumped straight up to a technical level presently beyond me! As
    you make this same recommendation several times, could you further
    clarify what you mean please? I'm not consciously/deliberately 'using
    packet writing', so I need to know how to stop it in practice.

    Is packet-writing synonymous with 'UDF'? Which inCD uses in my other
    CD0RW drive? (I've removed that disc and stopped inCD for these tests
    as you recommended.) But presumably that's not the issue here, and the
    implication of those IsoBuster analyses is that my source DVD discs
    contain content which has been 'packet written'? If so what in
    practical terms can I do about that? Must I abandon my main commercial
    program used so far for making my DVD movies, MemoriesOnTV? Even if I
    was willing to do that, is there a specific set of programs guaranteed
    *not* to use 'packet-writing'? Does Nero Express (and the other Nero
    programs apart from inCD) not use it at all?
    Do you simply mean close and re-open IsoBuster? This term 'session' is
    still not one I really grasp. (I'd rather not *have* to grasp it!)
    Philips DVD757VR (a 'combo', with both DVD and VCR facilities).
    Never a drop before 7am.
    Disc dumped. See above re packet-writing.

    Disc dumped. See above re packet-writing.
    I've copied it to a Ritek DVD-R 4X, so that I can now risk *treating*
    it like a 'good' disc. More on that later.

    That was my tentative diagnosis too - there's hope for me yet!
    This is another murky area for me. How can I tell for sure whether it
    is a 'multi-session disc'? What *can* I safely do with it?
    Disc dumped. See my query above re 'closing session'.
    Yes, Ritek seems at best 'middling; and I've seen some reports that
    they were downright poor at one time.
    Agreed, but I'm not sure about the practical implications of that?
    Agreed again, but see my earlier request for clarification.

    I've just emailed Codejam, developers of MoT (Singapore), to ask them
    whether MoT uses packet-writing.
    Many thanks for tutoring me on this. Hope you'll sustain the patience
    a while longer <g>.

    Unfortunately, I have only the one DVD player, and one DVD-capable PC
    in the house. So your exceptional precautions are not possible here.
    Given my relatively sparse recording output, not sure I'd want to
    invest that *time* anyway to be honest.

    It's salutary evidence of the primitive/fragile state of the
    technology, don't you think? Imagine the analogous scenario of writing
    a letter, say 50 years ago. Appropriate measures might be documented
    thus:
    1. Use at least 2 typewriters, each with 2 different brands of paper
    2. Ensure that 3 people inspect the each of the 4 letters, under the
    following forms of illumination
    - daylight
    - filament lamp light
    - fluorescent light
    3. When satisfied, make two sets of copies of all 4 letters, and store
    one in complete darkness and deposit the other set in your bank.
    4. Post the 4 letters in 4 different post-boxes, spread over 2 days.

    Although the parallel breaks down on the cost aspect: DVD recording is
    just that bit more expensive <g>.
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 6, 2005
    #33
  14. I'm could have sworn I saw a post in this thread last night or earlier
    today suggesting I try using Nero Info Tool, but I'm darned if I can
    now find it...

    Anyway, just to reply that I do use that. It is in fact identical to
    the tool within NeroStartSmart.

    Here's an example of its output for one of those 10 DVD-RWs I
    tabulated:

    Output from Nero InfoTool for Disc #4
    =======================================

    General
    -------
    Type: DVD Video (DVD-RW)
    Capacity: 1.13 GB

    Extended Information
    --------------------
    Layers: 1
    Version: 2
    Track Path: Single Track
    Disc Size: 12 cm
    Copy Protection: n/a

    Content
    --------
    File System(s): ISO9660, UDF
    Title: PICTTOTV
    Date: 8 June 2005
    Publisher: PICTTOTV
    Application: n/a
    Video Format: PAL 16:9 (Mpeg 2, 720x576)
    Region(s): All
    Play Time: 17 minutes (00:17:47)
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 6, 2005
    #34
  15. Terry Pinnell

    AnthonyR Guest

    Terry,
    I quickly just wanted to say that multi-session recording is when you record
    something, put data, onto a disc
    and then end the session, without finalizing or closing the disc.
    Then later on, you record onto the disc again, it adds it in a seperate
    session.

    When you read the disc, some software allows you to see the seperate
    sessions.

    And if you record as a DVD-Video disc, you have to close or finalize the
    disc for the files to be read correctly by dvd players other than the one
    you used to make the session.
    With a DVD-ROM format it mainly for data and would be read by a computer not
    a dvd player so finalizing the disc is less important.
    That's how i basically understand the difference, maybe others can elaborate
    better.

    Also their is a difference on how the -RW and +RW behave in this respect
    with dvd players, I believe the +RW doesn't need finalizing
    to be read by another +RW machine where the -RW disc does no matter what,
    this is why some people found the +RW discs easier to use the the -RW. I
    might not be exact in technical reason but just wanted to get the idea out
    there.

    AnthonyR.
     
    AnthonyR, Oct 6, 2005
    #35
  16. Thanks, Anthony, appreciate the explanations. I'm slowly getting to
    grips with some of this. But I must say that the more I read, the more
    there seems I have yet to learn!

    Have included a batch of Verbatim DVD+RW 4X in the new discs that
    arrived a few minute ago (and more DVD-RW, and some DVD-R).

    So many permutations now to remember: Drive, Medium, Program being
    used, Last program used, Phase of the moon... <g>
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 6, 2005
    #36
  17. Just to let you know I've now registered IsoBuster, so we're hopefully
    in sync.

    I have barely begun to explore the program's features; looks daunting
    to me! I did make a tentative attempt to try recovering disc #4, using
    the Extract Files facility, but unsuccessful.
     
    Terry Pinnell, Oct 6, 2005
    #37
  18. Terry Pinnell

    AnthonyR Guest

    Hi Terry,
    I know what you mean... the more you look into stuff the more layers of
    complexity you find.
    But the bright spot to this is you have both the talent and the energy to
    keep going. In the end that's all that is needed
    to figure stuff out, so eventually you'll be an expert on dvd rw burning. :)
    AnthonyR.
     
    AnthonyR, Oct 6, 2005
    #38
  19. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest

    Nah, IsoBuster is an easy one. Just right-click on everything!
    Did you try, on that particular disc, to go in and view its contents
    on a sector by sector basis? I ask because, almost always, if you can
    view the disc sector by sector, then the data is readable.
     
    Frank, Oct 7, 2005
    #39
  20. Terry Pinnell

    Frank Guest

    That may be the message that I recently posted. I've reproduced its
    contents at the end of this message.
    Yes, same program, maybe or maybe not the same version.
    Terry, that's the output of the Disc tab and while useful to determine
    the type of disc currently in a given drive - and in this case you'll
    notice that it's a DVD-Video disc and not a DVD-ROM disc - it's the
    information shown on the Software, Drivers, and ASPI tabs that can act
    as an aid in determining whether there's a driver conflict on your
    system which may be causing problems related to burning discs.


    ************ Contents of previously-posted message below ************

    You can install all of the CD/DVD burning applications on a given
    Windows system as you wish without causing a problem as long as the
    applications in question either a) don't install their own drivers or
    b) install drivers which don't happen to conflict with any
    already-installed drivers.

    From the list of applications that you've listed, I am only familiar
    with Nero, DVD Decrypter, and IsoBuster. Of those three, only Nero
    installs drivers on your system. There is, therefore, no conflict
    created when having Nero, DVD Decrypter, and IsoBuster all
    simultaneously installed on a single system. That said, however, I
    would never attempt to actually *run* any more than one of these three
    applications at once. In other words, it's perfectly okay to have all
    three of these applications simultaneously *installed*, but don't ever
    *run* more than one of them at a time.

    If you suspect that driver conflicts may be causing a problem on your
    system, and I wouldn'd rule out that possibility, I'd suggest that you
    run a program, included with the Nero package, called Nero InfoTool.
    In a typical installation of the full retail version of Nero 6 Ultra
    Edition, it will be installed at the following location.

    C:\Program Files\Ahead\Nero Toolkit\InfoTool.exe

    If you don't see a Shortcut to the Nero InfoTool program on your Start
    menu, then launch Windows Explorer, browse to the directory listed
    above, and double-click on the InfoTool.exe file to run it.

    If you seem not to have the Nero InfoTool program installed on your
    system, you can get a free copy by using the Download link on the
    following Web page.

    http://ww2.nero.com/enu/Info_Tool.html

    When Nero InfoTool is up-and-running, you'll see seven tabs: Drive,
    Disc, Configuration, Software, Drivers, Hardware, and ASPI. The
    Software, Drivers, and ASPI tabs will show you what's installed on
    your system. You can use this information to help determine whether
    it's likely you're experiencing a driver conflict.

    I'd also like to mention that if you don't do packet writing, you may
    want to disable Nero InCD from launching whenever you boot your
    system. This is easy to do using the System Configuration Utility
    program included with Windows. Just go to Start | Run... | enter
    "msconfig.exe" (without the quotation marks, of course) and click the
    'OK' button (or hit the Enter key on your keyboard). When the program
    is up-and-running, you'll see a number of tabs including one called
    'Startup'. Click on the Startup tab and you'll see a partial list of
    the items which get launched every time you boot your system. If you
    see InCD listed, and its checkbox has a checkmark (tick) in it,
    disable it by clearing the checkbox, then click the 'Apply' and 'OK'
    buttons, and re-boot your system for the change to become effective.

    When you re-boot you may receive a dialog box reminding you that
    you're using MSConfig to change your system's configuration (or some
    wording to that effect). You may want to check the box that says
    "Don't show me this message again", or some words to that effect, as
    there's no need to be reminded of this every time you boot the
    machine. Remember, you can always re-run the MSConfig program and
    re-enable any item that you've previously disabled. Also, when you're
    in the Startup tab within the System Configuration Utility (MSConfig)
    program, please don't disable any items with which you're not
    familiar, as this may, in the worst-case scenario, actually prevent
    your system from booting--and we certainly wouldn't want that
    happening as it's difficult for me to make house calls to West Sussex.
    :)
     
    Frank, Oct 7, 2005
    #40
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