Can I replace this old SCSI drive?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by A SCSI Guy, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. A SCSI Guy

    A SCSI Guy Guest

    The Problem: my 8 or 9 year old Seagate ST34520W 4.22 GB SCSI
    Ultra/Ultra Wide drive is dying. It wouldn't start yesterday, and the
    message I got when the computer POSTed was "Device not ready," and it
    was only luck that, after messing with it for some hours, it came
    back. I've gotten all of my data off it. This SCSI drive was/is my D:
    drive. Of course when it went out all of the other drives (all IDE
    drives), both physical and virtual, went up one drive letter. This
    screwed up many things on my system because shortcuts didn't work and
    many things were not where applications were looking for them.

    System information: My SCSI adapter is an Adaptec AHA-2940 Ultra/Ultra
    Wide PCI SCSI adapter. It's running on an 800 MHz P-III with 512 MB
    RAM running Win98se.

    My Question: Is it possible to buy a replacement SCSI drive that will
    operate with this old SCSI adapter? I need to keep that adapter
    because I'm using a special cable between it and my scanner, which I
    use a lot. Any recommendations for a SCSI drive for this system?

    I've looked around and see that I could get an exact replacement for
    this old drive but it's "factory refurbished." and only has a 90 day
    warranty. I'd rather have a new drive, if at all possible. And it
    doesn't have to be a ST34520W.

    If there are no SCSI drives sold today which will work on that adapter
    does anyone have any suggestions for keeping a D: drive active on my
    system for when the SCSI drive dies permanently?
     
    A SCSI Guy, Jan 15, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. A SCSI Guy

    Pennywise Guest

    |> running Win98se
    |> If there are no SCSI drives sold today which will work on that adapter
    |> does anyone have any suggestions for keeping a D: drive active on my
    |> system for when the SCSI drive dies permanently?

    I was thinking you might create a ram drive, RAMDRIVE.SYS won't allow
    you to specify the drive location.
    EMSDSK86 will do this, it's for a 386 (Dos), but might still work.
    http://www.simtel.net/product.php?url_fb_product_page=4825


    --
     
    Pennywise, Jan 15, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. You can get adapters for the new lvd connectors, no problem. Buy any drive
    you can afford. But then, do you really plan to use it?
    New high performance scsi drives spin 10000rpms or even more and get really
    hot. They need some air flow around them. But then, they are really fast.
    Use partition magic to shrink one of your other extended partitions/logical
    drives just a little bit, and create a primary partition there, minimal
    size.
    To give you more advices, we would need a printout of your partition layout.
     
    Walter Mautner, Jan 15, 2005
    #3
  4. A SCSI Guy

    Ingeborg Guest

    Maybe you can use 'Letter Assigner'?
    <http://www.v72735.f2s.com/LetAssig>
     
    Ingeborg, Jan 15, 2005
    #4
  5. A SCSI Guy

    A SCSI Guy Guest

    Oh, I'd use it all right. Do you know what adapter I should get to
    mate the Adaptec AHA-2940 Ultra/Ultra Wide PCI SCSI adapter with a
    newer SCSI drive? This would just be a replacement for my current
    internal cable, right?
    Hmmm, I'm not sure that's a great aspect for me. I'd be putting this
    in a desktop machine and the space inside is a little cramped. The
    SCSI drive is currently under another IDE drive that runs a little
    hot. Are there some non-high performance SCSI drives that are for sale
    these days that would not run so hot?
    I suppose that if worst came to worst I could do that, but I've got a
    scanner that the SCSI adapter serves too. So the SCSI is in the system
    no matter what and I'm wondering if I could just get an adapter
    adapter as you mention above and then buy a non-bleeding edge SCSI
    drive and use that?
     
    A SCSI Guy, Jan 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Howdy!

    The "W" says it's a WIDE drive.

    W drives use the same 68pin connector as today's Ultra 160 / Ultra
    320 drives do, just single ended.

    All of Seagate's current W drives do SE operation. Your Ultra/Ultra
    Wide controller should also do LVD operation, but that'll depend on the
    drives attached.

    So - to say it quickly - the cheapest Seagate SCSI drive you can buy
    new B)

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jan 16, 2005
    #6
  7. A SCSI Guy

    A SCSI Guy Guest

    Okay, so a Seagate ST336607LW 10K.6 36.7GB Hard Drive
    http://www.seagate.com/cda/products/discsales/marketing/detail/0,1081,541,00.html
    should work with my Adaptec AHA-2940 Ultra/Ultra Wide PCI SCSI
    adapter? I'm still concerned about the heat factor. Does anyone have a
    reference to how hot this thing would get?
     
    A SCSI Guy, Jan 16, 2005
    #7
  8. A SCSI Guy

    Barry OGrady Guest

    I saw a server with 12 x 9.1 GB ultra wide SCSI drives sell for $500 at an auction.

    -Barry
    ========
    "I see only with deep regret that God punishes so many of His children for
    their numerous stupidities, for which only He Himself can be held responsible;
    in my opinion, only His nonexistence could excuse Him."
    [A. Einstein (Letter to Edgar Meyer, Jan. 2, 1915)]

    Web page: http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
    Atheist, radio scanner, LIPD information.
     
    Barry OGrady, Jan 16, 2005
    #8
  9. Howdy!

    Hot - but not as bad as the first gen 7200s did.

    But that's quite a bit of overkill. Your controller will barely be
    able to keep up with the data from a 7200RPM SCSI drive today, much less
    that 10KRPM jobber.

    It'll work - but you won't see the benefits of the higher speed
    drives.

    Now, if you want the disk space - yah, that'll be good. But I'd opt
    for a 18G 7200RPM drive to help keep it cooler and cheaper myself.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jan 16, 2005
    #9
  10. A SCSI Guy

    A SCSI Guy Guest

    And a merry holiday to you, too.
    My main goals are to 1) keep a SCSI D: drive on my system which will
    allow all of my other drive letters to keep their places. Otherwise
    the system can't find anything since without this D: drive it will be
    looking for something on the F: drive, but what's now the F: drive
    used to be the G: drive, etc.; and 2) I could live with not getting
    the full speed. It's not optimum, but if it works it may be the
    solution I should try.
    I've only seen these offered as factory refurbished, discontinued
    drives that have maybe a 30 day warranty on them. I don't want to
    spend money on a SCSI hard drive that's going to crap out in 60 days
    and leave me with no further options but to start looking for a
    replacement again.
     
    A SCSI Guy, Jan 17, 2005
    #10
  11. Howdy!

    The distributor I buy from has 18.2G drives in stock, albeit
    Hitachi.

    Doing some digging myself for Seagates - I find all the 7200RPM
    drives are refurbs, all right. Sorry - wasn't aware that they'd dropped
    them.

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Jan 17, 2005
    #11
  12. Did you try cehcking the flux cacpatior ? Or the temporal converter?
     
    Wicked Nickname, Jan 18, 2005
    #12
  13. A SCSI Guy

    Barry OGrady Guest

    The only thing left is to remodulate the shields.



    -Barry
    ========
    "I see only with deep regret that God punishes so many of His children for
    their numerous stupidities, for which only He Himself can be held responsible;
    in my opinion, only His nonexistence could excuse Him."
    [A. Einstein (Letter to Edgar Meyer, Jan. 2, 1915)]

    Web page: http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
    Atheist, radio scanner, LIPD information.
     
    Barry OGrady, Jan 19, 2005
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.