Can I get some rudimentary Wavelab help here?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jim Beaver, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. Jim Beaver

    Jim Beaver Guest

    I know nothing about sound editing, but I'm working with Wavelab 5.01 to
    make some audiotape interviews intelligible. They are telephone interviews
    in which the interviewee's voice is extremely low, volume-wise, but the
    interviewer's voice is extremely loud. I'd like to use Wavelab to reduce the
    volume of the interviewer's voice so that when I turn up the volume on the
    interviewee's voice, my ears aren't blasted everytime the interviewer says,
    "Uh-huh." Wavelab is so over my head that I can't figure out how to use it
    for this simple task. Is this a good place to ask? If so, I'd love some
    help. Thanks.

    Jim Beaver
     
    Jim Beaver, Oct 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jim Beaver

    Spuds Guest

    If no joy here, you might want to try rec.audio.pro or rec.audio.tech.

    --

    "If hooking a car battery up to a monkey's brain will help find the
    cure for AIDS and save somebody's life, I have two things to say...
    the red is positive and the black is negative."

    - Nick DiPaolo
     
    Spuds, Oct 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jim Beaver

    dadiOH Guest

    The sure way with any wave editor would be to select each area (one at
    a time proably) that you want to change then use the program to
    diminish that area to the degree you wish. Repeat until finished,
    save the result in desired format (wav/mp3).

    You could, of course, compress the whole file at one time after
    judiciously setting the threshold. The problem is that there are
    high/low volumes within both areas (those that are loud and those that
    are soft) so the result wouldn't be just to diminish the loud voice in
    its entirety, it would be to diminish/increase *all* sounds in both
    voices.

    A better approach might be to amplify the entire file upward so that
    everything is near max. That would clip the sounds that are already
    high (turn off any "clip preventer") but with voice it shouldn't
    really hurt anything; then amplify the whole file again but downward
    to the listening level you want.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Oct 24, 2006
    #3
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