Can i Deactivate Windows XP Pro x64 Edition?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Guest, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I Purchased Windows XP Pro X64 ED. and installed and activated it, Not long
    after did i realise the requirments to have a 64bit computer, so i bought
    Windows XP Pro with SP2. Now i would like to build a different computer
    especially for my Windows x64 edition but i need to Deactivate it. Can anyone
    please Help me?? I tried to call microsoft but they expect me to pay $35 to
    Deactivate it. This is an OEM Version. Once again any help would be greatly
    appriecated. Thanks!
     
    Guest, Aug 17, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Guest

    Default User Guest

    There is no deactivation. You simply install it on another computer and
    activate on that one.
     
    Default User, Aug 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements


  3. There is no "de-activation" process. Anyway, because the WinXPx64
    license is available only as an OEM license, it is permanently bound to
    the first computer on which it was installed. It may not legitimately
    be transferred to another computer under any circumstances.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, Aug 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Even though technically the posts above are correct, all is not lost. If
    you're not prepared to pay $35 (fair enough) to get a second authentication,
    then the only option is to wait for 3 months until the MS database for
    registrations is emptied and reset. I hope I'm correct about the exact time
    frame.

    The other option is to contact MS again and hope you get to speak with
    someone different who will understand your mistake and honesty. They might be
    able to help you for free. If it was me I'd just install it and try
    registering over the net. If this doesn't work phone them and ask if your
    previous install and authentication in error has anything to do with it? Play
    dumb and above all be really, really nice to the person on the phone.

    TIP: Don't authenticate until the final day. As soon as you do authenticate,
    make a full back up of your system so you can reinstate it to this point if
    you need to.
     
    Guest, Aug 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    Rick Guest

    Your info below does not make any sense.

    There is no way you could have installed and activated XP x64 on a 32
    bit platform!

    The computer you installed XP x64 IS a 64 bit computer!!
     
    Rick, Aug 17, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    DKI Guest

    I am not sure but i though he would be able to move it to a different PC as
    long as the ORIGINAL piece of equipment it came with (the part the OS was
    sold with) is still in use with it.

    If it was the whole PC it came with then its then he is stuck.
     
    DKI, Aug 17, 2005
    #6

  7. No, that's no true, at all. While an Microsoft OEM operating system
    license may be legitimately sold and purchased with any non-peripheral
    hardware component, the license becomes permanently bound to the first
    computer in which that component is installed and on which the OS is
    installed. The OEM EULA makes this quite clear.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, Aug 17, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest

    DKI Guest

    Thanks for clearing that up.
     
    DKI, Aug 17, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    To what end? What if I replaced, say, the hard drive and RAM due to failure?
    Then I wanted to change the mobo and CPU to make it faster, then, I update
    my burner to the latest one. Am I still legal? It's still the same PC persay,
    but over 2 years I will have replaced everything. Where do I stand then?
     
    Guest, Aug 17, 2005
    #9
  10. As long as it is not a BIOS-locked copy of Windows, you will be OK.
     
    Colin Barnhorst MVP, Aug 17, 2005
    #10
  11. As long as it is not a BIOS-locked copy of Windows, you will be OK If it
    is BIOS-locked (I don't know of any large PC builders doing this with XP Pro
    x64) then as long as the replacement mobo has the same BIOS you would still
    be OK.
     
    Colin Barnhorst MVP, Aug 17, 2005
    #11
  12. Guest

    GregRo Guest

    Actual even if it is. You can still reactive it.

    Greg Ro
     
    GregRo, Aug 17, 2005
    #12
  13. Message cancelled and replaced with the one following.
     
    Colin Barnhorst MVP, Aug 17, 2005
    #13

  14. According to the EULA, an OEM license may not be transferred from one
    distinct PC to another PC. Nothing is said about prohibiting one from
    repairing or upgrading the PC on which an OEM license is installed.

    Now, some people believe that the motherboard is the key component
    that defines the "original computer," but the OEM EULA does not make any
    such distinction. Others believe that one could successfully argue that
    it's the PC's case that is the deciding component, as that is where one
    is instructed to affix the OEM CoA label w/Product Key. Again, the EULA
    does not specifically define any single component as the computer.
    Licensed Microsoft Systems Builders, who are allowed to distribute OEM
    licenses with computers they sell, are contractually obligated to
    "define" the computer as the motherboard, but this limitation/definition
    can't be applied to the end user until the EULA is re-written.

    Microsoft has, to date, been very careful _not_ publicly to define
    when an incrementally upgraded computer ceases to be the original
    computer. The closest I've ever seen a Microsoft employee come to this
    definition (in a public forum) is to tell the person making the inquiry
    to consult the PC's manufacturer. As the OEM license's support is
    solely the responsibility of said manufacturer, they should determine
    what sort of hardware changes to allow before the warranty and support
    agreements are voided. To paraphrase: An incrementally upgraded
    computer ceases to be the original computer, as pertains to the OEM
    EULA, only when the *OEM* says it's a different computer. If you've
    built the system yourself, and used a generic OEM CD, then _you_ are the
    "OEM," and _you_ get to decide when you'll no longer support your product.



    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, Aug 18, 2005
    #14

  15. Not always. I've encountered many different (meaning from different
    OEMs) BIOS-locked CDs that won't even install on a different
    motherboard, much less activate.



    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
     
    Bruce Chambers, Aug 18, 2005
    #15
  16. Actually, a BIOS-locked OS doesn't need to activate. As GregRo indicates,
    it either installs or it doesn't. If it installs it doesn't require
    activation.
     
    Colin Barnhorst MVP, Aug 18, 2005
    #16
  17. Guest

    GregRo Guest

    Actual depending on the system. There is a work around the bios lock.
    I have done it in on xp sp1 home system(not 64bit) -just to see. It
    may require activation.

    To work you need win98se boot disk or win98 or me system and a certain
    folder on your xp computer and you system needs to be fat32 to be
    installed correctly. You can change it afterwards.

    There


    Greg Ro
     
    GregRo, Aug 18, 2005
    #17
  18. I don't think the activation wizard is enabled in a BIOS locked OEM edition.
    It may not even be present. Since BIOS-locking and activation are both
    answers to the same problem (what MS calls "casual copying"), it is
    redundant to have both and I don't think your experiment can result in the
    appearance of the activation wizard.
     
    Colin Barnhorst MVP, Aug 18, 2005
    #18
  19. Guest

    GregRo Guest

    Alright here it goes. I was not going to tell this.

    On an emachine w2040. xp sp1 It is bios locked.
    This reason I know this is if you use the image key to reinstall it-no
    activation will be required. If you try to install this using the
    image key on another system it will require activation. Now if you
    use the key that is listed on the machine either way it will require
    activation.

    I think some manufactures are now removing the i386 folder or hiding
    it so you can't do the above or do a clean install.




    Greg Ro
     
    GregRo, Aug 18, 2005
    #19
  20. And, ultimately, there might be no actual parts from the original PC that
    are still in the new PC. But it's still the same PC, if, for example, it has
    the same case. But even the case isn't definitive. I've swapped out cases on
    machines before, without changing the intent of what is the original PC. But
    usually the distinctive piece is the case which is why that's where the OEM
    sticker goes.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Aug 18, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.