call manager (or vg) hacking

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Bill Friedman, Dec 29, 2003.

  1. Looking for recommendations on logging and securing against unauthorized
    calls through Call Manager (running 3.1)

    I found this article which seems relevant except that it's in regard to
    UNITY. However, I wonder if there is some other similar restriction
    mechanism with Call Manager. At this point, they're specifically using
    our system to make international calls.

    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/toll-fraud-pub.shtml
     
    Bill Friedman, Dec 29, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bill Friedman

    shope Guest

    I suggest you pull some of the ref design stuff from cisco.

    Try www.cisco.com/go/srnd

    note that the call manager 3.3 info assumes that you read the previous
    version docs as well - it adds to the recommendations rather than overrides
    them.
     
    shope, Dec 29, 2003
    #2
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  3. Bill Friedman

    CiscoTech Guest

    The easiest way would be to modify the call route plans to prevent the
    international operator calling....
    For example if your system was set up to dial "9" for an outside line, then:
    allow 11 digit numbers begining with 91 and to deny all other 11 digit numbers
    beginning with 9...

    Just a thought....
     
    CiscoTech, Dec 31, 2003
    #3
  4. Bill Friedman

    Rik Bain Guest

    Rik Bain, Dec 31, 2003
    #4
  5. :The easiest way would be to modify the call route plans to prevent the
    :international operator calling....
    :For example if your system was set up to dial "9" for an outside line, then:
    :allow 11 digit numbers begining with 91 and to deny all other 11 digit numbers
    :beginning with 9...

    You assume that A) 10 digit numbers beginning with 1 cannot be
    international calls, and that B) international calls are 10 or more
    digits long.

    A) Canada is an 10-digit International Call from the USA. Under NANP
    (North American Numbering Plan), so are

    "Bermuda, and many Caribbean nations, including Anguilla, Antigua &
    Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands,
    Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts
    and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and
    Tobago, and Turks & Caicos" ( http://www.cnac.ca/npa_hist.htm )

    Some of those locations have really high incidences of toll fraud.


    B1) 90# "Operator, I'd like to place a call to..."

    B2) 9011-nn-xxxx -- are you sure there are no countries with
    2 digit country codes that don't accept 5 digit phone numbers
    with no routing codes? Leitchenstein perhaps?

    I have been in at least two countries that allowed 5-digit local
    phone numbers. e.g., local phone numbers in Stockholm could be 5, 6, or 7
    digits long. It is true that to get to Stockholm from
    the USA, you'd need a 2 digit country code, a 1 digit routing code,
    and then the phone number, which would raise the minimum to the magic
    number 11 you mention -- but if Sweden hits the margin, then one
    could easily imagine that in a smaller country one might be
    able to slip something in.
     
    Walter Roberson, Dec 31, 2003
    #5
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