Cable vs. DSL

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by wntw, May 25, 2004.

  1. wntw

    127.0.0.1 Guest

    cable vs DSL is irrelevant without information on location and pricing.
    location is a big factor for bandwidth issues
    pricing is a big factor when value is a primary concern

    $25/mo DSL will be very competitive against $50/mo cablemodem (basic cable
    is required for cablemodem services).
    if one has satellite TV, then a DSL package has a better value for the price
    (DSL bundle with local phone services).

    web browsing with both services relies on the web congestion (both services
    do equally well)

    for massive downloading, cablemodem has the potential advantage (some
    cablemodem services has a cap).

    not all cablemodem service providers are same
    not all DSL service providers are the same

    clearly state the problem. cable vs DSL is too general....

    -a|ex
     
    127.0.0.1, Jul 31, 2004
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  2. wntw

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, 127.0.0.1 mused:
    |
    | (basic cable is required for cablemodem services)

    That's not true in most markets, and becoming less true in the rest.
     
    mhicaoidh, Jul 31, 2004
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  3. wntw

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, JB mused:
    |
    | No it does not not one line is missing ...

    Look at the message you replied to, you dolt. You snipped the your
    words I was replying to, and left mine. Just a tosser.
     
    mhicaoidh, Jul 31, 2004
  4. wntw

    JB Guest

    "and left mine"
    What all of it?
    Whatever!

    I left most of it so I could point out what a egyt you were being
    If you look back I cut the top line of gargle
    weirdo
     
    JB, Jul 31, 2004
  5. wntw

    Jim Berwick Guest

    Comcast is a cable TV/internet service. I use them as my ISP at home. I
    do not work for Comcast. Why we outsource our news is simple. It is
    cheaper for us to outsource it than for us to do it poorly. The higher
    ups feel if we are going to include a service it should at least be a
    decent service, and it's more cost effective. Please note that outsource
    does not mean send overseas. We "outsource" to allthenewsgroups.com.
    I know quite a bit about TCP/IP networking in general, which is why I'm
    sitting at work right now monitoring network operations.
    Nope, I work for a company called SNiP (Southern New Jersey Internet
    Provider). Here is some of our record at ARIN:
    OrgName: SNIP
    OrgID: SNIP
    Address: 100A Twinbridge Drive
    City: Pennsauken
    StateProv: NJ
    PostalCode: 08110
    Country: US

    ReferralServer: rwhois://rwhois.snip.net:4321/

    NetRange: 209.204.64.0 - 209.204.127.255
    CIDR: 209.204.64.0/18
    NetName: SNIP
    NetHandle: NET-209-204-64-0-1
    Parent: NET-209-0-0-0-0
    NetType: Direct Allocation
    NameServer: NS1.SNIP.NET
    NameServer: NS2.SNIP.NET


    NetRange: 216.83.96.0 - 216.83.127.255
    CIDR: 216.83.96.0/19
    NetName: SNIP-2
    NetHandle: NET-216-83-96-0-1
    Parent: NET-216-0-0-0-0
    NetType: Direct Allocation
    NameServer: NS1.SNIP.NET
    NameServer: NS2.SNIP.NET

    As you can see, we own every IP address from 209.204.64.0 through
    209.204.127.255, which is 16,384 addresses. We also own the second
    block, another 8,192 addresses.

    Do I use DHCP? Where? At work we assign IP addresses to dialup
    customers via DHCP. Our DSL customers are given static addresses (not
    sure why as it's not my decision), as are our T1/T3 customers. Our
    servers are obviously given static addresses, as are our co-location
    customers.

    Comcast Cable assigns my public address at home via DHCP, and in house my
    home network has two DHCP servers, one handing out 192.168.0.100/24
    through 192.168.0.120, and one doing 192.168.0.150/24 through
    192.168.0.170. Do you actually understand what DHCP is?

    Either way, you basically have two choices. You can continue thinking
    you know anything and looking like a fool, or you can STFU and listen to
    professionals. Clearly I am the one sitting at work monitoring a 26,000
    user network, while you are sitting at home. I'd recommend you STFU.
     
    Jim Berwick, Aug 1, 2004
  6. wntw

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, JB mused:
    |
    | I left most of it so I could point out what a egyt you were being
    | If you look back I cut the top line of gargle
    | weirdo

    Hmm ... Let's see. Perhaps you should be the one to look back ... My
    original post:

    |Taking a moment's reflection, JB mused:
    ||
    || ... I've supplied facts
    |
    | You've supplied opinion, conjecture, incongruous argument, and some bad
    | breath. The only thing you have come close to regarding a fact was an
    | outdated "security write-up" from 2001.

    Now your post ...

    | <Sniveling rodent's words snipped>
    |
    || You've supplied opinion, conjecture, incongruous argument, and some bad
    || breath. The only thing you have come close to regarding a fact was an
    || outdated "security write-up" from 2001.
    |
    |
    | sounding the dumb ass siren

    My entire post exists within your quoted text. You indicate you've
    snipped text, specifically the "sniveling rodent's words." However, the
    only words that were snipped were your own, so (as I said) one can only
    conclude that you are calling yourself a sniveling rodent. Certainly can't
    mean me, since none of my "words" were "snipped."
     
    mhicaoidh, Aug 2, 2004
  7. wntw

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, Jimmy mused:
    |
    | I use cable modem and my tcp/ip settings say I have private IP address

    Are you also behind a router?
     
    mhicaoidh, Aug 2, 2004
  8. wntw

    Jimmy Guest

    I use cable modem and my tcp/ip settings say I have private IP address
     
    Jimmy, Aug 2, 2004
  9. wntw

    Jimmy Guest

    why?
     
    Jimmy, Aug 2, 2004
  10. wntw

    Rick Merrill Guest

    because then your IP is assigned by the router, not by your ISP and
    the term 'private' is totally bogus. Does your "IP address" start
    with 192.168... ???
     
    Rick Merrill, Aug 2, 2004
  11. wntw

    amsjabams Guest



    NO, I do not use a router but do have an IP address (DHCP) but it changes when I force it,
    also when I tried to setup IIS 5.1 on another machine I could not get access to it from
    outside my ISP's network, but I've been told they may block it but unsure as they do not
    reply to email's about it. what's yor point anyway?
    are my settings lying to me?
     
    amsjabams, Aug 3, 2004
  12. wntw

    mhicaoidh Guest

    Taking a moment's reflection, amsjabams mused:
    |
    | what's yor point anyway? are my settings lying to me?

    His, and my, point is that your ISP is not assigning you a private IP
    address. If they did, then none of your traffic could travel outside of
    their IP domain. If you are showing a 192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x IP, then you
    are receiving that from a router (possibly your broadband modem doubles as a
    router). If you go to the following web site, it will display your public
    IP address assigned by your ISP ...

    http://www.whatismyip.com/
     
    mhicaoidh, Aug 3, 2004
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