Best Inkjet Printer for Direct CD and DVD Labeling?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by cmashieldscapting, May 27, 2006.

  1. cmashieldscapting

    measekite Guest

    they are but they are much more prone to clogging
    yes especvially on glossy paper. they are richer and more vibrant. my
    canon has not faded in a year using kirkland paper and canon ink.
    yes about $9.00 for a canon cart at costco
    about the same
     
    measekite, May 30, 2006
    #41
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  2. That's about what I was afraid of, but thanks for telling. Typing is
    not such a terrible hardship and in some ways easier than printing
    would be, I just wondered.

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, May 30, 2006
    #42
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  3. cmashieldscapting

    zakezuke Guest

    Does costco even carry ink for new canons in the store? If so is it
    really $9.00 each?
    I know you "can" get it off the website, in twin packs, for $13.50 each
    for color, small black for $14.50. The big black, the pgi5, doesn't
    even look like they carry that at all. website or store. Buying costco
    two packs for these 4 inks, out of 5, saves you 11 cents over buying
    singles at office depot. My local costco doesn't carry ink for the new
    canons as of Thursday.

    You "can" buy a mp780 for $300ish, or an ip8500 for $350ish which will
    take the $9.66 ink. Both print on CDs with a tray on e-bay.

    The price of ink for the new Canon averages to about $13.75/tank for 4
    colors. The ink for the Epson R800 is $13.50 each at office depot.
    The estimated yield on the r800 ink is HIGHER than canon. I'm unsure
    about actual fact as I never owned that specific model.

    While I like the canons, enough to own three of them, and consider them
    to be a very trouble free product, the moment someone askes about
    archival I have to say Canon presently isn't where it's at. Perhaps
    they will offer an a4 pigment printer in the future, they will offer an
    a3 printer in the future, but as for this moment Epson is the only
    choice.
     
    zakezuke, May 30, 2006
    #43
  4. Well, what everyone said here, and at Epson when I called the number
    you kindly supplied, leads me towards the Epson Stylus Photo R 800.

    The only negative things were:
    --Not as multi-function as an all-in-one (but I have an Epson Stylus
    Photo RX500 now I mainly use as a photocopier and computer
    printer--don't use half the functions on it)
    --Colors may not be as vibrant and inks are more prone to clog
    --Drying time may be slow, but to "cure" no slower than those using
    dye-based inks.
    --Ink is NOT water-soluble, so users have to be SURE not to get any on
    themselves or anything else! I've never had a mess with the Epson
    Stylus Photo RX500, but the ink's so expensive I haven't used it enough
    to have a clog. Could anyone offer info about cleaning procedures for
    either this or the Stylus Photo R 800? Is it ever necessary to come
    into contact with the ink, or do you just run a cleaning cycle, or, if
    worse comes to worst, take it in to repair?

    The REALLY positive things are:
    --Archival prints, possibly 100 years! I'm having a professional scan
    all my negatives and prints onto CD due to his MUCH higher-quality
    scanner, but it would be so nice to be able to make prints myself,
    whenever I want and almost whatever size I want.
    --Print size 4" - 44" -- much greater than RX500 or RX700.
    --Ink costs almost the same so not a big issue, and lasts much longer.
    --Smallest drop size so not only is resolution better but hopefully
    doesn't waste as much ink.
    --Has gloss optimizer, which costs the same as ink, to put a better
    finish on prints, presumably including CDs/DVDs, so smearing wouldn't
    be a big issue.
    --Several like-new units available online for way less than factory
    cost.

    Anyone with anything to add, please speak now or forever hold your
    peace! Thanks!

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, May 30, 2006
    #44
  5. cmashieldscapting

    measekite Guest

    he does not use canon ink therefore he is not really using a 100 percent
    canon printer. he is using a generic printer so he really cannot
    comment on fadability since that is controlled by the ink and paper.
    i think they will offer a b4 before an a4. look at the pro9500.
     
    measekite, May 31, 2006
    #45
  6. piece??

    fpu set. bye bye kite.
     
    John McWilliams, May 31, 2006
    #46
  7. cmashieldscapting

    zakezuke Guest

    There are procedures you can follow to clean the heads in the event of
    a clog.

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.periphs.printers/msg/e418354378537894

    Arthur Entlich offers a free cleaning manual. Epsons use micropiezos
    rather than thermal jets. The difference is you can put just about
    anything though a micropiezo as chemistry or the rate of expantion of a
    liquid to a gas doesn't enter into the picture at all. The drawback
    is, from my understanding, the shaft is longer, clogs are bigger, and
    you don't have an expanding gas to clean them. This is resolved at
    least in the r2x0/r3x0 model by having a pump hooked directly up to the
    pladen geared to operate when the printer goes in reverse, but it's not
    always enough. In this event, do get a cleaning manual, or cleaning
    cartridges. Do get the cleaning manual before you use any paper
    towels.

    Taking it in for repair is an option, and considering this is a $400
    printer, it's worth shelling out shop fees to resolve issues. But the
    main issues can most often be resolved with windex. I think of Epsons
    as being fickle, requiring more maintance than other more disposable
    technologies.

    http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=51595&forum_id=40

    The other bit of maintance is the waste ink pads, aka the diaper. An
    external tank is highly reccomended because the technique of cleaning
    the heads sucks a fair amount of ink. I don't know the r800 personaly,
    but i'm willing to wager that like the lesser models it too has a door
    to access the pad tube and can be re-routed to an external tank. You
    will still get a waste ink full error, but this can be reset using the
    ssc utility.... a link can be found in the above thread.

    The SSC utility also has a function to hot swap ink cartridges. There
    is no way change one cartridge and have it clean that one cartridge. I
    don't know if it's a good idea, but you can use the utility to park the
    head and replace the tank, without the reverse pladen suck the ink
    mode. Seek a wiser authority on this subject as I abanonded my Epson.

    Clogging is typicaly the result of lack of use, not use. Others have
    looked for software to automaticly print a test page once a week.
     
    zakezuke, May 31, 2006
    #47
  8. cmashieldscapting

    zakezuke Guest

    There are procedures you can follow to clean the heads in the event of
    a clog.

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp.periphs.printers/msg/e418354378537894

    Arthur Entlich offers a free cleaning manual. Epsons use micropiezos
    rather than thermal jets. The difference is you can put just about
    anything though a micropiezo as chemistry or the rate of expantion of a
    liquid to a gas doesn't enter into the picture at all. The drawback
    is, from my understanding, the shaft is longer, clogs are bigger, and
    you don't have an expanding gas to clean them. This is resolved at
    least in the r2x0/r3x0 model by having a pump hooked directly up to the
    pladen geared to operate when the printer goes in reverse, but it's not
    always enough. In this event, do get a cleaning manual, or cleaning
    cartridges. Do get the cleaning manual before you use any paper
    towels.

    Taking it in for repair is an option, and considering this is a $400
    printer, it's worth shelling out shop fees to resolve issues. But the
    main issues can most often be resolved with windex. I think of Epsons
    as being fickle, requiring more maintance than other more disposable
    technologies.

    http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=51595&forum_id=40

    The other bit of maintance is the waste ink pads, aka the diaper. An
    external tank is highly reccomended because the technique of cleaning
    the heads sucks a fair amount of ink. I don't know the r800 personaly,
    but i'm willing to wager that like the lesser models it too has a door
    to access the pad tube and can be re-routed to an external tank. You
    will still get a waste ink full error, but this can be reset using the
    ssc utility.... a link can be found in the above thread.

    The SSC utility also has a function to hot swap ink cartridges. There
    is no way change one cartridge and have it clean that one cartridge. I
    don't know if it's a good idea, but you can use the utility to park the
    head and replace the tank, without the reverse pladen suck the ink
    mode. Seek a wiser authority on this subject as I abanonded my Epson.

    Clogging is typicaly the result of lack of use, not use. Others have
    looked for software to automaticly print a test page once a week.
     
    zakezuke, May 31, 2006
    #48
  9. Should I ask at a computer store whether this is even possible, what
    type of tank to get, and how to install it, since there are bound to be
    various kinds so can't just order one online?

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, Jun 1, 2006
    #49
  10. Since this printer is presumably connected to my computer (don't know
    how else it would work!) couldn't I just go online once a week and
    print something being sure to use this printer?

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, Jun 1, 2006
    #50
  11. cmashieldscapting

    zakezuke Guest

    A computer store, to be fair, is going to know jack about the subject.
    This is a undocumented procedure, and will require tubing from a
    hardware store. An aftermarket ink store or website will have useful
    info on this subject.

    I just googled the subject, and it looks like it's not as simple as the
    r2x0/r3x0 series.
    http://www.inkrepublic.com/KnowledgeBase/R800WasteInk.asp?C=0
    http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=51595&forum_id=40
     
    zakezuke, Jun 1, 2006
    #51
  12. cmashieldscapting

    Hendo Guest


    The R300 and the R800 are very different printers ,using different
    inks.

    The R300 uses 6-color Dye based photo Inks.

    The R800 uses 8-color Epson UltraChrome pigment ink. Which include
    inks and ink colors that the R300 does not use. This printer also uses
    a Gloss Optimizer.

    I own both these printers and I aggree that the R300 prints better on
    CD's than the R800, using OEM inks.
     
    Hendo, Jun 1, 2006
    #52
  13. C ool. Thanks for confo.

    F-U set.
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 1, 2006
    #53
  14. I haven't bought, or committed to buy, anything yet. Could you (and
    anyone who knows!) please explain "prints better," and other pros and
    cons you have learned from experience, including the archival issue?

    As for archival properties, it stands to reason any fairly intelligent
    person would keep a DVD in a case out of sunlight. But moisture, even
    very small amounts such as drops of sweat, is sometimes unavoidable.
    Sure one should always avoid handling a CD's surface, but what are the
    chances of accidental smears, color coming off the edge of the disk
    onto the user's fingers and so on, using the R300? I don't want to
    have to apply any treatment afterwards that doesn't come with the
    printer--that's why the gloss optimizer sounds so good!

    I'd really appreciate as much information as possible. I will probably
    end up buying from the Epson clearance center, which doesn't allow
    returns.

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, Jun 1, 2006
    #54
  15. cmashieldscapting

    measekite Guest

    this discussion is like ink. stupid come and stupid go. why you ask.
    here is the answer. who cares how long the archival quality of ink is
    as long as it lasts 5 to 7 years. the dye on the dvd is good for an
    average lifespan o 5 years. some more and some less. it is recommended
    to copy over your dvd every 5 years if you value them. so as long as
    the ink is readable for the same time the dye is good who cares.
     
    measekite, Jun 1, 2006
    #55
  16. cmashieldscapting

    measekite Guest

    yes and you should also use oem ink since you do not print much
     
    measekite, Jun 1, 2006
    #56
  17. cmashieldscapting

    measekite Guest

    talk to the mfg. this guy writes as if he knows about everything. he
    does not own an r800. that costs too much money.
     
    measekite, Jun 1, 2006
    #57
  18. cmashieldscapting

    zakezuke Guest

    I don't own the r800... so all my data is second hand.
    [http://forum.videohelp.com/viewtopic.php?p=1329323]

    According to this person, the extra inks are not used on DVDs,
    including the gloss optimizer.

    But best to ask pre-sales support on this issue. (800) 463-7766

    I have considered using my old r200 filled with gloss optmizer to print
    on discs, but this is an untested mickey mouse solution.

    Spraying discs, if I could find a spray that doesn't kill dvd data, is
    the system I plan to employ using a disused cake box.
     
    zakezuke, Jun 1, 2006
    #58
  19. How serious are smearing, running, or such problems on disks, and, if
    worse comes to worst, what sort of spray should be used to apply a
    protective coating?

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, Jun 1, 2006
    #59
  20. Okay, I called Epson and they

    --Confirmed the R 300 is not an option as they have discontinued it.
    So if the R 300 prints disks better than the R 800, but the R 200 does
    NOT, that STILL lends favor to the R 800.

    --Confirmed that the gloss optimizer is used ONLY on paper, so would
    not be a factor in my purchasing the R 800 as far as disks are
    concerned, but would be a good point as far as printing my photos
    archivally.

    --The R 800 may still be slightly better as far as permanence (meaning
    color adhering to the disk and not coming off) as it is pigment, not
    dye-based, ink, but the Epson rep said they'd never had any smearing
    issues with the R 200, depending on the brand and type of disks used.
    They don't make the disks, nor have they tested them all, so I'd have
    to rely on other peoples' experiences as to what brands to use.

    --The Epson rep also said the R 800 was better than the R 200 for
    printing disks because it has 8 color cartridges, all of which are
    used, even on disks, so a wider color output, and a 1.5 pl drop size,
    the smallest drops allowing for the greatest detail.

    So even despite the gloss optimizer not being a factor, according to
    Epson themselves the R 800 still seems the better choice. They did
    confirm they don't manufacture any waste tank for it. Without a waste
    tank, does it clog, waste ink, or what? Thanks.

    Cori
     
    cmashieldscapting, Jun 1, 2006
    #60
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