best credit-card sized digital camera?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Henley, May 17, 2004.

  1. Mike Henley

    Mike Henley Guest

    what's the best credit-card sized digital camera?
     
    Mike Henley, May 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mike Henley

    samsung Guest

    Bit larger than a credit card, but 5.25MP, 3x zoom, 4xdigizoom, SD cards,
    metal case, very light, but has the feel of being solid...all for £179.99
    with 3 year guarantee at Aldi from Wednesday this week...
     
    samsung, May 17, 2004
    #2
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  3. Mike Henley

    Bowzre Guest

    Brand name? Model?

     
    Bowzre, May 17, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike Henley

    samsung Guest

    Traveller, DC5300, see http://www.traveler-service.de/english/DC-5300.htm...
    Also available from Jessops as a Centra or something like that with 12
    months guarantee for £199.99.. Aldi 3yrs guarantee £179.99 from 20th which
    is Thursday, sorry not wednesday. Pop in your aldi and they have it as a
    lead item in their leaflet.....I bought one last year and they're brill,
    except they were £199.99 then. ps also comes now with 128mB SD card and 2
    batteries.....etc...
     
    samsung, May 17, 2004
    #4
  5. Mike Henley

    SteveJ Guest

    where do you find it in the USA?


     
    SteveJ, May 17, 2004
    #5
  6. Mike Henley

    Dave Brown Guest

    I looked at a couple of these from Minolta and Casio, and decided to
    go just a tad bigger and get the Casio QV-R51. It fits in a shirt
    pocket or in a tiny pouch. Has very fast startup, very fat shutter
    release, takes good landscape and macro pictures (actually surprising
    good macros), and has a ton of cool features, like generating html
    pages, 21 bestshot presents, and uses AA batteries (which come with
    the kit and a charger).

    I am very pleased with it, check it out for about $300 on the net.

    db
     
    Dave Brown, May 18, 2004
    #6
  7. Mike Henley

    Mike Henley Guest

    i would not pay that much money for a camera with a brand name that
    i've never heard of before... seriously, for that much, you can get a
    good canon, sony, nikon or whatever...
     
    Mike Henley, May 18, 2004
    #7
  8. Mike Henley

    orion Guest

    Name a 5.25MP with 3xmech zoom,4xdig zoom, for less than £179 with 3 year
    guarantee in canon, sony,nikon, or whatever....
    Also note this thread was 'credit card sized....I also have a EOS300D but a
    'brick' like that is not something to pop in the top pocket!!!...
     
    orion, May 18, 2004
    #8
  9. Mike Henley

    pixturesk Guest

    Check out the Canon S500 Elph. Metal construction, superb viewer, 5
    megapixel, great 3-1 Canon optical zoom lens, many resolution settings,
    great focusing technology. I am in Toronto, about $700.00 Can money. Comes
    with rechargable lithium battery with the charger.
     
    pixturesk, May 18, 2004
    #9
  10. This is the same as the Gateway DC-T50=Toshiba PDR-5300=Vivitar 3930=Premier
    DC5330=Centon DC5. Not sure who actually manufactures it, but everyone seems
    to put their name on it and sell it!

    This is a very poor 5 Mp camera, and is best avoided, despite the seemingly
    too-good-to-be-true $300 price. Furthermore, it is not "credit-card sized."
    Probably the best credit card sized camera is the Casio 3.2 MP EX-S3, though
    of course you'd get such a small camera only for fun.

    You are much better off buying a 4Mp Canon S400 for $325, or splurge for the
    Canon S500 for $425.

    Steve
    http://digitalcamerashortlist.com
     
    Steven M. Scharf, May 18, 2004
    #10
  11. Mike Henley

    Aardyvarky Guest

    Yeah, but the post is about the "BEST" credit card sized camera. I'm
    pretty sure your no-name camera, besides price, does NOT trump the
    Canon IXUS or Nikon Coolpix ultra compacts. That is not "Best" in my
    book.
     
    Aardyvarky, May 18, 2004
    #11
  12. But price is not everything! Go for less Mp, but better quality images if
    you need something less expensive. See the review conclusions at:
    http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/t50_pg5.html

    "As they say, size isn't everything and, in the case of the DC-T50, the
    5-megapixel imager is not able to overcome the color balance and shooting
    performance issues we experienced; we honestly can't recommend this camera."
     
    Steven M. Scharf, May 18, 2004
    #12
  13. Mike Henley

    Mike Henley Guest

    i have some bitter experience with those no-name high MP (or even high
    on features) cameras as some of them produce truly awful pictures,
    very very awful results.

    Also, i have no interest in a 3 year guarantee on a piece of unusuable
    trash.
     
    Mike Henley, May 18, 2004
    #13
  14. << Check out the Canon S500 Elph. Metal construction, superb viewer, 5
    megapixel, great 3-1 Canon optical zoom lens, many resolution settings,
    great focusing technology. I am in Toronto, about $700.00 Can money. Comes
    with rechargable lithium battery with the charger. >>

    A few weeks ago I was trying out every small camera I could find as a
    replacement for an Optio S that was broken. I had not been happy with the
    Optio S because it was just too small for my clumsy hands, and it had a long
    delay between pushing the button and actually taking a picture. I also had a
    problem pressing the power button instead of the exposure button!

    I looked seriously at getting an S500 which had just arrived in the local
    stores. As I recall, it was selling for $500. It would have been my first
    choice if it did not also have such an unbearable delay.

    Of all the cameras I tried, the fastest one turned out to be the Pentax Optio
    S4i. Yes, it is still too small. Yes, it has the power button in the wrong
    place. There is still a slight delay, but nowhere near as long as the others.

    My only other misgiving about the Optio S4i, is that in order to speed up
    focusing, they freeze the LCD display, making it impossible to see last-second
    changes in the scene unless you wait until it has completed focusing. Although
    the optical viewfinder is tiny, it appears to be the best way to avoid the
    freeze problem.

    You expect newer models to have more megapixels, but I think that will be less
    important in the next generation. The biggest challange will be reducing the
    various operational delays.

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, May 22, 2004
    #14
  15. Hmm. In its default state, the S500 continues to update the LCD display
    while focusing. But there is a "quick shot" menu setting which, if
    selected, stops updating the LCD during focusing and focusing occurs
    quite a bit faster. I wonder how the S500 in that mode would compare
    against the Optio S4i. In addition, the S500 resumes LCD updates as
    soon as it is finished focusing, so the LCD image freezes only for a
    fraction of a second then it's usable again. It isn't clear from what
    you wrote whether the S4i does this.

    For any object that's at a relatively constanst distance, you're better
    off prefocusing anyway. Just aim the camera at the object you want to
    focus on, press the shutter button halfway down, and let it focus. Then
    aim the camera to get the composition you want, perhaps wait for the
    precise moment you want, then press the release fully. Under these
    conditions, focus speed doesn't matter that much anyway.

    In fact, the S500 is more flexible than most P&S cameras for this style
    of preset operation. There is an autofocus lock, which allows you to
    preset the focus on a particular object and then lock it without holding
    down the shutter button, and the lock persists for multiple frames until
    you unlock it. Similarly, you can lock exposure and flash exposure in
    advance.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, May 22, 2004
    #15
  16. Mike Henley

    stan Guest

    That depends on your price range and your definition of "best."
     
    stan, May 23, 2004
    #16
  17. << In its default state, the S500 continues to update the LCD display
    while focusing. But there is a "quick shot" menu setting which, if
    selected, stops updating the LCD during focusing and focusing occurs
    quite a bit faster. I wonder how the S500 in that mode would compare
    against the Optio S4i. In addition, the S500 resumes LCD updates as
    soon as it is finished focusing, so the LCD image freezes only for a
    fraction of a second then it's usable again. It isn't clear from what
    you wrote whether the S4i does this. >>

    Dave-

    Your description of the S500's quick shot setting sounds like what I observe
    with the Optio 4Si's normal setting. Perhaps the 4Si has a "slow shot"
    selection that would continue to update the LCD while focusing! It does have a
    "quick" menu feature, but that seems to be just a way to quickly change between
    custom setups.

    Today I made some shots with the 4Si's display both on and off. With the
    display on, there seems to be slightly more delay than with it off. With it
    off, the delay between pushing the button and taking the picture compares with
    the delay of the Canon Digital Rebel. I think I'll use the optical viewfinder
    with the LCD turned off from now on.

    With the LCD turned off on the S500, what kind of improvement in delay do you
    experience?

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, May 24, 2004
    #17
  18. Actually, it seems to be the reverse for the S410/500. (Note: I
    actually have a S410, but it's so close to the S500 that Canon prints a
    single manual for both cameras. I assume my experiences with the S410
    apply to the S500 too).

    With the LCD turned off, it takes a little bit of extra time to open the
    shutter when you half-press the shutter release to set focus and
    exposure. With the LCD on, the shutter is obviously already open. You
    can hear the shutter opening click in the former case, and the delay
    seems just a hair longer.

    Anyway, I normally leave the LCD on even if I'm using the optical
    finder. The camera has no way to display its current operating modes
    except via the LCD, so I leave it on so I can see the shooting modes
    before exposure.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, May 24, 2004
    #18
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