Best circular polarizer filter for DSLR?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Curly, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. Curly

    Curly Guest

    Which brand makes the best 55mm circular polarizer filter? I'll be using it
    with Olympus C-2500L and have a 43-55mm adapter handy. Should I stick to the
    Olympus brand? TIA!
     
    Curly, Apr 22, 2004
    #1
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  2. Curly

    zbzbzb Guest

    Which brand makes the best 55mm circular polarizer filter? I'll be using it
    Get a Hoya HMC cir polarizer. Good price and quality. Look for a used one on
    E-Bay before buying new.
     
    zbzbzb, Apr 22, 2004
    #2
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  3. Curly

    Banjopikr1 Guest

    Best circular polarizer filter for DSLR?

    I have a Tiffin I bought about 15 years ago for a Minolta 9000. Paid about $60
    then. Just bought a polarizer from Porters Camera website for $16.95. Both work
    equal on the Rebel.
     
    Banjopikr1, Apr 22, 2004
    #3
  4. Curly

    Curly Guest

    Get a Hoya HMC cir polarizer. Good price and quality. Look for a used one on
    Can you really tell the difference between Hoya HMC and Hoya non-HMC polarizer?
     
    Curly, Apr 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Curly

    Curly Guest

    Can you mount both polarizer and ring flash on the Olympus lens?
     
    Curly, Apr 22, 2004
    #5
  6. (Curly) wrote in
    B+W (or B&W) "Circular Käsemann, slim version"!!! Great Quality; perhaps
    you can find it on eBay.


    Regards,
    Carsten
     
    Carsten Schneider, Apr 22, 2004
    #6
  7. Curly

    Ed E. Guest

    Can you mount both polarizer and ring flash on the Olympus lens?

    The Tiffen ones aren't the slim versions and typically have threads on the
    front side of the filter just like whatever it's screwing into. So if your
    ring flash screws into the lens or housing, you should be fine. Do you have
    any other filters that you use with your ring flash? If so, the polarizer
    shouldn't be any different except that you will want to be able to turn it
    to get the desired amount of polarization.

    If you want new, check Adorama.com's "house brand" of filters which are
    Tiffen for less money. Otherwise, check out eBay auctions.
     
    Ed E., Apr 22, 2004
    #7
  8. Curly

    Bob Salomon Guest

    Can you really tell the difference between Hoya HMC and Hoya non-HMC
    polarizer?[/QUOTE]

    Take a shot with a bright light in it or a bright spectral highlight.
    Then you will see the difference. Then try it with an SH-PMC coated
    Heliopan to see the most effective flare control.
     
    Bob Salomon, Apr 22, 2004
    #8
  9. Curly

    Ken Alverson Guest

    Is that what it's actually called? Must be some odd German idiom; to me that
    reads "circular cheese man".

    I wonder what the logical jump is from cheese man to polarizer.

    Ken
     
    Ken Alverson, Apr 22, 2004
    #9
  10. Define Best. The best I would guess is B&W's (may need the thin for
    wide angle). However the question is do you need the best if it is over
    kill.
     
    Joseph Meehan, Apr 22, 2004
    #10
  11. Curly

    Charlie Self Guest

    Ken Alverson notes:
    Mr. Cheeseman probably developed it.
    Charlie Self
    "Property is not the sacred right. When a rich man becomes poor it is a
    misfortune, it is not a moral evil. When a poor man becomes destitute, it is a
    moral evil, teeming with consequences and injurious to society and morality."
    Lord Acton
     
    Charlie Self, Apr 22, 2004
    #11
  12. Curly

    Bob Salomon Guest

    Dr. Kåsemann invented a new method of making a polarizing filter several
    decades ago.

    It consists of taking a very high quality polarizing foil and stretching
    it in all directions to make it much tighter and flatter then a standard
    foil sandwiched in glass.

    In order to keep the foil stretched and flat the edges of the glass that
    the Kåsemann foil is in are edge sealed. Because of this edge sealing
    the filter not only has a flatter foil (or foils as they are also made
    in circular pol) but the foil is now immune to damage from moisture or
    fungus so this construction is also referred to as a "Tropicalized"
    polarizer.

    After Dr. Kåesmann's death a few years ago the Kåsemann factory was
    purchased by the Schneider group. Kåesmann polarizers are available from
    both Heliopan and B+W and are available in several types (at least from
    Heliopan). Bayonet I, II, III, IV, VI, 108, VIII, 50, 60 and 70 as well
    as 52 Zeiss. Wide Angle and warmtone. Most of these are available in
    both linear and circular types.

    Many users feel the extra cost of the Kåesmann is worth it for the
    longer life compared to the sandwiched construction of the standard type
    as well as providing more effective polarization and resolution due to
    the stretched foil, the higher quality foil and the sealed rim.
     
    Bob Salomon, Apr 22, 2004
    #12
  13. Curly

    Bob Salomon Guest

    However, due to the construction a Kåesmann is not available in a slim
    mount as it is thicker then a standard polarizer.
     
    Bob Salomon, Apr 22, 2004
    #13
  14. Curly

    Bob Salomon Guest

    No that is a film type in English. Heliopan will be the most neutral as
    measured with a densitometer on a light box. B+W will be next. Close to
    each other though.
     
    Bob Salomon, Apr 22, 2004
    #14
  15. Very correct. Thanks for the correction.
     
    Joseph Meehan, Apr 22, 2004
    #15
  16. Curly

    Curly Guest

    Can you mount both polarizer and ring flash on the Olympus lens?
    I'll be using the circular polarizer filter and the ring flash only.

    BTW, does circular polarizer work with indoor macro? I'll be shooting some
    glass and shiny chrome product photography.
     
    Curly, Apr 23, 2004
    #16
  17. (Charlie Self) wrote in
    Correct! ;-)

    Gruß,
    Carsten
     
    Carsten Schneider, Apr 23, 2004
    #17
  18. B+W now offers a slim version, but perhaps a little bit thicker then a
    "normal" slim filter...

    Regards,
    Carsten
     
    Carsten Schneider, Apr 23, 2004
    #18
  19. Curly

    DS Guest

    Unless, as in the case of some 35mm metering systems, a camera specifically
    NEEDS a circular polarizer, it's a waste of money over the cost of a
    standard lineal polarizer --- isn't it??

    ds
     
    DS, Apr 23, 2004
    #19
  20. Curly

    Bob Salomon Guest

    Not necessarily as it depends on both the metering and/or the AF system
    as well as the viewfinder display (some readouts may be polarized).

    A circular polarizer will work properly, in all lighting conditions,
    with most current cameras, virtually all modern SLR cameras and many of
    the cameras made in the past 20+ years as well need the circular. And,
    most likely, most future cameras will also utilize some type of beam
    splitter for metering or focus or display.

    So while a linear polarizer may be less expensive in the short run it
    would be much more expensive to have to replace it with a circular
    polarizer because your camera changes at another time.

    The above, of course, does not apply to large format cameras or many
    medium format cameras.
     
    Bob Salomon, Apr 23, 2004
    #20
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