BenQ E1000. Is it a good camera? Or you can recommend something else?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Nick82, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. Nick82

    Nick82 Guest

    Hello everyone.

    I just saw BenQ E1000 in one store. It has 10Mpixels, 3” display,
    manual controls and 3 x optical zoom…

    Can someone tell me is it a good camera?

    Or you can recommend me something else for a similar price?

    I’m searching an affordable compact digital camera.
    Mega pixels are not important, I need a descent photos.

    Thanx
     
    Nick82, Jul 28, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Nick82

    Nick82 Guest

    I forgot to say the price.
    The price of this model is around 130€ (~200$) and I'm searching
    something up to 200€ (~320$).

    Thanx

    Nick
     
    Nick82, Jul 28, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Nick82

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    I forgot to say the price.
    The price of this model is around 130€ (~200$) and I'm searching
    something up to 200€ (~320$).

    Thanx

    Nick

    It appears to be a decent box. See,
    http://www.trustedreviews.com/digital-cameras/review/2007/10/02/BenQ-DC-E1000/p1

    But, the price isn't far off the Canon S5, so for me, personally, I'd be
    tempted to pass on the 10 Meg sensor of the BENQ and opt for the hot-shoe
    and bigger zoom of the S5.

    But, if you don't want to pack around an extra flash and don't mind the
    smaller zoom, it doesn't sound like the BENQ will disappoint...


    Good Luck,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, Jul 28, 2008
    #3
  4. Nick82

    Mark Thomas Guest

    Benq is an offshoot of the Acer corporation. They (usually) make
    mid-quality equipment at a pretty low price. I have one of their film
    scanners, and once owned one of their compact digital cameras. I'll
    take a wild stab that the optics will be ok-to-good, but the sensor will
    be noisy.

    If you can find a little Canon (or Sony or Nikon) around the same price
    and specs, I'd go that way instead. You'll get a better sensor and
    processing engine.
     
    Mark Thomas, Jul 28, 2008
    #4
  5. Nick82

    Nick82 Guest

    Canon S5 with external flash. It is a little too big. I'm searching a
    compact version.

    Well, I spoke with several persons and they all recommend me Canon.
    You also.
    So are they as good as everyone says.

    Also, I found 3 interesting models:
    PowerShot A580 and A590 IS. Also, IXUS 70 (somewhere it is called
    SD1000 DigitalElph).

    So, I saw that there are several differences between these models.
    A580 and A590IS are made of plastic and they have AA batteries (IS has
    image stabilization and 1 Mpixel more than A580).
    IXUS 70 (SD1000) has metal body and LiIon battery.

    Which one of these models would you like to recommend?

    I'm buying my first compact digital camera and I'll like to know are
    there too many differences between these models?
    What is better AA or LiIon batteries, metal or plastic body?
     
    Nick82, Jul 30, 2008
    #5
  6. Nick82

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    If you are thinking of something like the Powershot A580, you might also
    want to look at the A720. I use it, and like it a lot.

    Regarding batteries, I like something that uses AA batteries because it's
    easy to find spares. But the extra life of the LI batteries is good too. I
    comprimise and use LI AA batteries in my A720.

    I think you will find the build quality of the A720 IS a bit better than its
    various A500 cousins. Also, the image quality is better, not perfect, but
    better.

    If image quality is your biggest concern, I'd still look at the S5. It
    isn't all that much bigger than the A series Canons, and it does have a
    built in flash as well as the hotshoe. It's just nice to have the option of
    popping on one of the better external flashes. Also, the video mode of the
    S5 is considerably better than the A series Powershots.

    The 432mm zoom on the S5 is good for two reasons.

    First, and most obvious, you can really get up close and personal with just
    about anything you want to shoot.

    Second, the aperture range of 2.7 to 3.5 is a lot brighter than the A series
    lenses, thus giveing you faster shutter speeds at higher zooms.

    Good Luck,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, Jul 30, 2008
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.