Are you folks MAC or PC?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by baker1, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. baker1

    Sarah Brown Guest

    Pretty sure you need at least a 386 to run everything since (and including)
    Windows 95.
     
    Sarah Brown, Dec 27, 2005
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  2. baker1

    Bruce Hoult Guest

    I guess you missed the screen shot I posted of a 21 year old Mac game
    running on my brand new dual G5?

    And accounting software is a good example. I also mentioned my 15 year
    old accounting program in the same post.
     
    Bruce Hoult, Dec 27, 2005
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  3. baker1

    Bruce Hoult Guest


    That is an emulation. The Apple can also emulate Intel CPU instruction sets
    to run DOS programs too but that is a tedious way of doing things and it is
    slow and not safe if the program use some obscure hardware specific calls
    directly.[/QUOTE]

    I'm sorry but you sound confused.

    If it was emulation then obscure hardware specific calls would be
    perfectly safe. That is certainly the case with DOS emulators on the
    Mac.

    But whatever it is, the average user doesn't have to care. Old programs
    are on their hard disk, they double click them, and they run perfectly
    and much faster than they did when they were first written. The user
    doesn't have to do anything special.

    Did you know that the Pentium Pro and all later Intel chips (Pentium II,
    Penntium III, Pentium IV, Pentium M) are not actually x86 chips but only
    emulate them?
     
    Bruce Hoult, Dec 27, 2005
  4. I'm sorry but you sound confused.

    If it was emulation then obscure hardware specific calls would be
    perfectly safe. That is certainly the case with DOS emulators on the
    Mac.

    But whatever it is, the average user doesn't have to care. Old programs
    are on their hard disk, they double click them, and they run perfectly
    and much faster than they did when they were first written. The user
    doesn't have to do anything special.

    Did you know that the Pentium Pro and all later Intel chips (Pentium II,
    Penntium III, Pentium IV, Pentium M) are not actually x86 chips but only
    emulate them?
    [/QUOTE]


    It is not emulation. The Pentium CPUs have the native x86 op-codes built
    into them. It is spawned from the x86 family, except it is using a larger
    instruction set that is running on 32 bit.

    While the Motorola CPU definitely cannot execute Intel op-codes, program
    op-codes has to be translated to Motorola op-codes. That is emulation.


    Wannabe
    =======
     
    WannabeSomeone, Dec 27, 2005
  5. Yep
    I went from OS 7.5.3- to 9.2 on my old Performa 6400. Thats a
    pretty lengthy existence in terms of OS upgrades to hardware.
     
    Little Green Eyed Dragon, Dec 27, 2005
  6. baker1

    George Kerby Guest

    Beta IS the superior format. If not, just WHY did 98%+ of ENG reporters and
    television stations decide to go that way, as opposed to the P.O.S. M-wrap
    format that JVC tried to introduce to compete. The pros just laughed. Today,
    betacam is still in the catbird's seat.


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    George Kerby, Dec 27, 2005
  7. baker1

    Bill Funk Guest

    No, they aren't.
    Market share shows how well you're doing in the market.
    As the market grows, a shrinking share can result in more sales, but
    reflect a loss in the marketplace. This means everyone else is selling
    more, too, and leaving you in the dust.
    Just because you're accelerating doesn't mean you're winning the race.
    Yes, you did.
    Read what you responded to, then read your response.
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 27, 2005
  8. baker1

    Bill Funk Guest

    Stating facts is bashing? Gee, what a wonderful way to ignore things;
    "I know it's a fact, but I don't like it, so it's bashing."
    Yes, I have several things (including computers) that are more than a
    year old. We tend to keep things until the no longer work, or no
    longer fit our needs. (We just replaced a 13-year old vehicle, for
    example; the other one we have is 7 years old. Does that count?)
    What does that have to do with what I wrote?
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 27, 2005
  9. baker1

    Bill Funk Guest

    Does IBM still sell PCs?
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 27, 2005
  10. baker1

    Bill Funk Guest

    That's not what I said, and the fact that you try to make it so is one
    of the things that puts me off Macs. Why do you need to be so zealous
    that you need to twist things?
    If the Mac were all that you say it is, you wouldn't need to do that,
    would you?
    The Mac is just another way of doing things. It's not bad, it's not
    good. It's a tool. It's not a way of life, nor does it make life
    better in a way that a PC can't.
    Get over it.
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 27, 2005
  11. Why would anyone want to run XP...period?
    Mmmm...running XP with FAT32.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Dec 27, 2005
  12. baker1

    Ray Fischer Guest

    After all, given that you're nearly forced to buy a new copy of Windows
    with every new machine you buy, why stick with an old OS? I own
    licenses to two or three versions of WinXP.
    On a Mac you don't need to run an old version of the OS.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 27, 2005
  13. baker1

    Guest Guest

    the only thing emulated is the 68k instruction set on powerpc chips,
    which is obviously a requirement when the cpu changes. apple spent a
    lot of time getting that to work well. older powerpc software runs
    without any emulation. the claim that old software won't work is
    simply false.
     
    Guest, Dec 27, 2005
  14. baker1

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Since the Pentium, the chips emulate x86 instructions by converting
    them into RISC-type instructions which are then scheduled and executed
    by the CPU.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 27, 2005
  15. baker1

    Ray Fischer Guest

    This is a lie: "Apple makes your investment in hardware and software
    obsolete every time it changes a version".

    My current Mac has run several versions of Mac OS going back a number
    of years. Updating the OS has obsoleted nothing.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 27, 2005
  16. baker1

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Also true of Windows.
    Also true of Microsoft.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 27, 2005
  17. baker1

    Cynicor Guest

    But I'm good in bed so it all balances out.
    Except when they're designed to take advantage of advances in hardware,
    like so much software (esp. games) does. And I assume you're referring
    to desktop software only in this context.

    No. Does Windows XP run more reliably than programs that target the 286
    platform? Yes. Does it run programs that ran on Windows 3.1 or DOS? Yes.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 27, 2005
  18. baker1

    Cynicor Guest

    But the ones I own have an MTBF of about 12 hours, so it averages out
    everyone else's.

    I knew I should've backed up the photos on that 250 GB cheapo drive.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 27, 2005
  19. baker1

    Cynicor Guest

    And there's a reeeeeeeeeeally good reason for this, on both sides. The
    vast majority (95%) of mysterious blue screens and crashes are due not
    to the OS but to poorly written driver software that sits at kernel
    level. Windows XP has a whole lot of code in it to work around known
    problems in poorly tested software. Those "report crash info" pop-ups
    really do work as well - they anonymously aggregate thousands of reports
    and help trace down problems far more effectively. It's not like either
    Apple or Microsoft just tosses out new OS releases without trying to fix
    problems, even when they don't create them in the first place.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 27, 2005
  20. baker1

    spudnuty Guest

    I was a pro video guy for many years. We were very happy to dump out
    3/4" "portables" for the new Sony 1 piece Betas. Much nicer cassettes
    also. We also used the 1" Betas for many years which eventually went
    digital.
    Richard
     
    spudnuty, Dec 27, 2005
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