Apple. Is it true that no one can stand their latest op-sys?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Dec 9, 2013.

  1. RichA

    Guest Guest

    that doesn't mean they'll shoot more than a single battery's worth in
    one session.

    there are plenty of 'serious photographers' who take their time for
    each photo and might shoot 50 or 100 photos in a session.

    those who shoot thousands of photos at a time are smart enough to get a
    second battery. those who don't do that don't need to waste their money
    on something they won't use.
    remember, you didn't read what i wrote before you spewed.
    not at all.

    and there are far more casual photographers than serious ones anyway.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
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  2. RichA

    Guest Guest

    how often do you do that?

    and don't you have a camera that gets somewhere in that range per
    charge?
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
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  3. RichA

    Guest Guest

    depends how far away they are. someone in queens or long island could
    easily think nothing about going to manhattan just for b&h. it's just a
    subway ride.

    you have no way to know.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  4. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    There's nothing else in NYC that gives me the urge to go down there
    though, mostly because the cost of everything has become so high.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 15, 2013
  5. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    B&H has free parking.But wouldn't Hunt's be closer for you.
     
    PeterN, Dec 15, 2013
  6. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    You persist in changing attribution lines, as above. Is it a deliberate
    attempt to annoy, or are you that careless.
    But, You don't carry a spare because most people don't need to. I will
    carry one. EOD.
     
    PeterN, Dec 15, 2013
  7. RichA

    Guest Guest

    you persist in lying but nothing new there.

    i didn't change anything about attributions, and i left all of them in
    to show just how much of a liar you are.

    that makes *you* the careless one, as well as illiterate and dishonest.
    i never said anything about what *i* do. you are as usual, lying.

    just because you carry a spare doesn't mean everyone must do the same
    as you. stop forcing your ways on others. this isn't about you or
    anyone else.

    why do you even have a problem with what the rest of the world does?
    people are smart enough to decide for themselves if they need another
    battery or not. as i said, most don't and that's why they don't buy
    one.

    what you do makes no difference anyway, nor do people give a shit
    whether you consider them to be a serious photographer and you aren't
    the arbiter of what is a serious photographer either.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  8. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Never, so far. I don't think I've exceeded 250 RAW shots in any
    single day. Sometimes, at a football or baseball game where I shoot
    continuous, I'll break the 100 mark. Non-sports, though, I don't
    usually exceed 50 shots.

    But, you were the one that brought up 1,000 to 2,000 shots.
    I have no idea. Having never shot that many images before recharging
    the battery, I don't have a handle on the count. My usual procedure
    is to recharge the battery at the end of every day's shoot. I have
    several spares, so this is not mandatory, but it's a safe practice. I
    rotate the batteries.

    A day's "shoot" depends entirely on the photographer's interests.
    Sports and event photography usually are high-number shoots. What I
    go for when not doing those is usually low-number shoots.
     
    Tony Cooper, Dec 15, 2013
  9. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    When I take a boat out, I make sure there are life preservers in it. I
    don't expect to use them, but it makes sense to have them.

    I have several batteries and several SD cards. One of each per camera
    would suffice, but there's nothing wrong with erring on the safe side.
     
    Tony Cooper, Dec 15, 2013
  10. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Why do you post something as nonsensical and off-subject as this? Do
    you just feel compelled to post something argumentative?

    My reply above was to someone who lives six hours by train from
    Manhattan. Read the damn post before you nitpick.

    Even a person who lives a subway ride away from B&H wouldn't go there
    *just* for a lens cap. That would be a $5.00 round-trip. That person
    might go to B&H for just a lens cap *if* he had some other purpose in
    mind for the trip, but that's what I said.
     
    Tony Cooper, Dec 15, 2013
  11. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I understand, but then I expect your photographic interests are
    different from mine. I'd make the trip because my interest in candid
    street photography, and NYC is Mecca for that.
     
    Tony Cooper, Dec 15, 2013
  12. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
     
    PeterN, Dec 15, 2013
  13. RichA

    Guest Guest

    exactly my point.
    which means one battery is more than enough, just like i said.
    yes i was.

    some cameras can shoot that many on a single charge.
    which means it's more than enough. you've never hit the limit.
    good idea.
    what for, when you've never needed any of them?
    exactly my point.

    what's wrong with you today? you're agreeing with me.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  14. RichA

    Guest Guest

    that's completely different.

    a second battery is not a safety issue.
    be sure to bring a second car battery in your trunk. nothing wrong with
    erring on the safe side.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  15. RichA

    Guest Guest

    what's nonsensical? you questioned whether someone would go to b&h just
    for a lens cap.

    some people might do that. others won't.

    you don't speak for everyone, nor do you have any way to know if
    someone did that or not.
    for *him* it makes no sense, but he is not the only customer b&h has.

    for the millions who live near b&h, it may very well make sense.
    how do you know?

    have you interviewed everyone who lives on the ny subway lines?

    have you interviewed all of b&h's customers to find out the purpose of
    their trip?
    you obviously have never heard of monthly passes.

    that means the trip won't cost a thing since they already paid for
    unlimited rides.

    the only cost is the lens cap.
    you have no way to know that.

    they might just want a lens cap and don't mind the subway ride.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  16. RichA

    Guest Guest

    so it's not a myth.
    people also calculated on paper before that. so what? more of the usual
    irrelevancies.

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VisiCalc>
    VisiCalc was the first spreadsheet computer program, originally
    released for the Apple II. It is often considered the application
    that turned the microcomputer from a hobby for computer enthusiasts
    into a serious business tool. VisiCalc sold over 700,000 copies in
    six years.
     
    Guest, Dec 15, 2013
  17. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : In article <>,
    : says...
    : >
    : > : In article <>, Eric Stevens
    : > :
    : > : > >> In the early 80's, I was intrigued by Apple, interested in their
    : > : > >> computers. But an engineer friend of mine who went into re-programming
    : > : > >> (re-writting software) then said that the system was junk and that the
    : > : > >> people he met who used them were sub-intelligent.
    : > : > >
    : > : > >then he was a moron.
    : > : > >
    : > : > >he must think nasa employees are sub-intelligent, because they use a
    : > : > >lot of macs. landing spacecraft on mars is for stupid people anyway.
    : > : >
    : > : > The early 80s was the time of the Apple II
    : > :
    : > : missing the point entirely, as always.
    : > :
    : > : the moron that rich is referring to is talking about macs.
    : > :
    : > : one of the biggest criticisms of the mac, especially in its early days,
    : > : was that it wasn't a real computer because it lacked a command line and
    : > : the interface was 'toy like' that was designed for stupid people.
    : >
    : > Well, I'm old enough to remember when the Mac first came out, and I didn't
    : > hear either of those criticisms. In fact we (computer people) liked the Mac's
    : > GUI a lot and thought it was one of the nicest technological advances we'd
    : > ever seen. (For a system that's toy-like and designed for stupid people, see
    : > Windows 8.)
    : >
    : > What we did find annoying about the Mac, and which generated a fair amount of
    : > ridicule, was its absence of any form of error reporting. Its sole error
    : > message was "Sorry, an error has occurred", and the only action it could/would
    : > take was to reboot. Unix and DOS were bad enough in that respect, but the Mac
    : > was worse.
    : >
    : > : the belief was that if you weren't smart enough to understand dos or
    : > : unix, then you shouldn't be using a computer. you were a lesser form of
    : > : life.
    : >
    : > Maybe some people thought that, but I never heard anybody say it.
    : >
    : > : you still hear the same idiocy now, mostly from linux users.
    : > :
    : > : the apple ii was not criticized in the same way. it had a command line
    : > : and was just as powerful as anything else back then.
    : >
    : > That is pretty much nonsense. There were lots of computers at the time that
    : > were far more powerful. The Apple ii's innovation, and that of other early
    : > personal computers, was accessibility, not power.
    :
    : Name two that were "far more powerful" at the same price point.

    Since I didn't say "at the same price point" (and neither did the person to
    whom I was responding), I'll ignore that demand.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 15, 2013
  18. RichA

    Sandman Guest

     
    Sandman, Dec 15, 2013
  19. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : In article <>, Robert Coe
    :
    : > : one of the biggest criticisms of the mac, especially in its early days,
    : > : was that it wasn't a real computer because it lacked a command line and
    : > : the interface was 'toy like' that was designed for stupid people.
    : >
    : > Well, I'm old enough to remember when the Mac first came out, and I didn't
    : > hear either of those criticisms. In fact we (computer people) liked the Mac's
    : > GUI a lot and thought it was one of the nicest technological advances we'd
    : > ever seen. (For a system that's toy-like and designed for stupid people, see
    : > Windows 8.)
    :
    : a lot of people thought the mac was fantastic, but not everyone did.
    :
    : there were critics who bashed it saying it was a toy, no command line,
    : etc.
    :
    : > What we did find annoying about the Mac, and which generated a fair amount of
    : > ridicule, was its absence of any form of error reporting. Its sole error
    : > message was "Sorry, an error has occurred", and the only action it could/would
    : > take was to reboot. Unix and DOS were bad enough in that respect, but the Mac
    : > was worse.
    :
    : your memory has failed you.
    :
    : there was *far* more than just one sole error message.
    :
    : the errors fell into two groups. the first group was for the ds errors
    : which officially stood for dire straits but actually meant deep shit
    : where something crashed. usually that meant a reboot but not always.
    :
    : the other group was for the normal errors like file not found, trying
    : to read past the end of a file, trying to delete a file that's in use,
    : etc. those rarely, if ever required a reboot.
    :
    : > : the belief was that if you weren't smart enough to understand dos or
    : > : unix, then you shouldn't be using a computer. you were a lesser form of
    : > : life.
    : >
    : > Maybe some people thought that, but I never heard anybody say it.
    :
    : oh, they definitely did. some still do.
    :
    : > : you still hear the same idiocy now, mostly from linux users.
    : > :
    : > : the apple ii was not criticized in the same way. it had a command line
    : > : and was just as powerful as anything else back then.
    : >
    : > That is pretty much nonsense. There were lots of computers at the time that
    : > were far more powerful. The Apple ii's innovation, and that of other early
    : > personal computers, was accessibility, not power.
    :
    : nothing nonsense about it.
    :
    : other computers at the time included the commodore pet, trs-80, etc.,
    : and they were comparable to the apple ii. even the ibm pc was
    : comparable.
    :
    : > : visicalc, the
    : > : first spreadsheet, was on the apple ii, *before* there was an ibm pc.
    : > :
    : > : it turns out that the only 'sub-intelligent' people were the ones with
    : > : a closed mind that couldn't see just how advanced the mac really was.
    : > : the graphic interface it introduced is now standard, along with many
    : > : other things the mac had under the hood.
    : >
    : > That's true, but your strawman assertions about how the Mac was received
    : > don't hold up very well.
    :
    : nothing strawman about it. it's how it was.

    My memory may fail me, as you assert, but I'm 76 years old. From what you say
    and the way you say it, I place you at around 30, tops. So it's pretty clear
    that I was there and more than a little likely that you weren't.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 15, 2013
  20. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    Oh, sorry, thought I was dealing with a neurotypical.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 15, 2013
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