Anyone have an Acer Veriton 3900Pro?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by ~misfit~, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    .... or access to one? I have one here and all of the wires to the front
    switches etc. have been pulled from the board. The only 'manual' that I can
    find doesn't cover things like that and I'm slowly losing what's left of my
    sanity trying to troubleshoot a mobo that I can't even connect up properly!

    A pic of that area around the southbridge would be a wonderful thing -
    failing a 'proper' srvice manual.

    TYVMIA. :)
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 9, 2012
    #1
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  2. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Please disregard, problem sorted. :)
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 10, 2012
    #2
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  3. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    I have one of these that works perfectly, one that works somewhat and one
    that doesn't do anything but pulse the fan (and LED) when power is applied.

    I saw a bunch for sale on TM a while back listed as having bad capacitors.
    The guy was selling the 'bad' PCs (sans RAM, CPU and HDD) in lots of 20 for
    very little. The behaviour of the one I have that works *somewhat* makes me
    think that it IS caps that's the problem with it and also with the bad one.

    The problem is that the nine caps around the CPU socket that are obviously
    the VRM caps are of the polymer type (4V 560uF) - the caps that were
    supposed to cure the 'bad caps' issue. There are also five big 'wet'
    electrolytics (16V 1500uF) in the general area but they all /look/ good.

    In the past, IME, it's always been the 6.3V VRM caps that have given
    trouble. They're the ones that do the most work. 6.3V was the lowest common
    voltage for 'wets' whereas polymers use different voltages. They're there
    for 'smoothing' the vcore, to give the CPU a constant voltage - which is
    usually well under 2V. They leave a margin for headroom so 4V makes sense.

    So... Polymer caps don't have the stamped-in venting that wets do as they
    don't produce pressure when they fail. Therefore they don't visibly fail - a
    real PITA for folks like me who have been known to replace failed caps on a
    mobo and then have it run for years. If you can't see the bad ones then how
    do you know which ones they are?

    Well, the real issue is has anyone here seen an Acer Veriton 3900Pro with
    failed caps? I need to know if it *is* the polymer VRM caps that fail. I
    have an Intel dual-socket Xeon server board here that was never used that I
    was intending to sell on TM. The trouble was that it only had one
    (single-core) Xeon fitted and consequently nobody wanted to pay enough for
    it... The good news is that it has 40 (yes, *40*) Sanyo OS-CON polymer caps
    (unused remember) of the same value (4V 560uF) as the 9 on the Acer board.
    http://www.capacitorlab.com/capacitor-types-polymer/ They are a little
    taller than the (unknown brand) caps on the Acer but that's not a problem.

    I can swap them over - in fact that's why I still have the server board -
    all those luverly capacitors. However if possible I'd like to get
    confirmation that it is the polymer caps that fail on the Acers. I'd hate to
    do the swap only to find that it's the bit 16V wets that fail (without
    showing). To me it's worth getting these boards going if possible. They cost
    me $30 each... but they're from 2006/7 and can take 45nm Core2Duo CPus of
    800 or 1066MHz FSB. That makes them still quite useful.

    So if anyone has experience of Acer Veriton 3900Pros (or knows someone who
    does and can make a quick call to confirm...) and can let me know if I'm on
    the right track before I get the soldering iron out I'd be very grateful.

    TIA,
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 12, 2012
    #3
  4. ~misfit~

    Richard Guest


    I have had 3 of the previous acers (p4 based) have dickky caps in the
    power supply. Mobo was fine.

    THankfully they were standard micro atx boards so they were rehomed into
    the cheapest nastiest case available at the time. One of them is still
    working doing my torrenting these days.
     
    Richard, Oct 13, 2012
    #4
  5. ~misfit~

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Thanks Richard. Yeah, I know that they can have capacitor issues in the PSUs
    too but I have several here and that's not what's causing me grief right
    now. :(

    I can't find any info on who makes the polymer caps in the VRM but
    everything that I read says that polymer caps in general are many times more
    reliable than wet electros. *However* there are five 16V 1500uF (wet
    electro) caps on each mobo that aren't part of the VRM but, when Googling or
    checking places like badcaps.org, they come up as about the worst caps ever
    made and are known to fail without showing any visible sign that they have
    done so.

    Unfortunately I'm not really in the position to go throwing good money after
    bad (as my old Dad would say) without some sort of pointer.... It's 'only' a
    couple bucks a cap to buy (plus gas to get to Jaycar...) but it'd be nice to
    know in advance if that's likely to be the answer - rather than the VRM
    polymer caps.

    Cheers,
    --
    /Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, Oct 13, 2012
    #5
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