Another Possibly Faulty Question in MCSA/MCSE 70-290 Training Kit

Discussion in 'Microsoft Certification' started by CJH, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. CJH

    CJH Guest

    The problem lies in the explanation to this question, but if the explanation
    is incorrect it throws off the question. Here is the question, correct
    answer and the confusing part of the explanation in brief.

    QUESTION
    You have a USB-connected hard disk identified as drive H: on a computer
    running Microsoft Windows Server 2003. Disk Defragmenter fails when you
    attempt to defragment the hard disk. What is the most likelyk cause?

    CORRECT ANSWER
    The file system on drive H: is marked as dirty

    EXPLANATION
    Disk Defragmenter will fail if a volume's file system is marked as dirty.
    If the volume's file system is marked as dirty, you must run chkdsk before
    you can defragment the volume.


    I examined the section in the MCSE/MCSA 70-290 training kit that refers to
    defragmentation. Nowhere in the section does it say that defragmentation
    will fail if the volume is dirty. It also says, and this is a direct quote
    from the book, if the tool indicates that the volume is dirty, there may be
    corruption and CHKDSK should be run before defragmenting.

    The word difference is small..."may" and "should"...but quite a few of the
    questions I'm encountering in the practice exams use small rephrasings to
    confuse the test taker, or to make the answer harder to guess.

    I'm open for explanations for this one. I'm just trying to pass the test
    eventually.
     
    CJH, Jan 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. CJH

    CBIC Guest

    I'm open for explanations for this one. I'm just trying to pass the
    This is a problem I have with MS tests. They should admit that most techs
    use a third party defragmenting tool like Diskkeeper.
     
    CBIC, Jan 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. CJH

    CJH Guest

    That won't help. In fact the question specifically refers to Disk
    Defragmenter...the Microsoft tool. My beef is with the explanation, and how
    it is incorrect and how it throws off the question.
     
    CJH, Jan 4, 2006
    #3
  4. CJH

    CBIC Guest

    In
    Yeah sorry about that. I don't have an answer for you I just took this
    opportunity to air my problem.
     
    CBIC, Jan 4, 2006
    #4
  5. CJH

    Kurt Guest

    I think most of us have similar beefs with all exams, MS or otherwise. The
    questions often seem to deviate from the knowledge base in a way that
    doesn't help test your knowledge, but seems to deliberately try to confuse
    the "testee" as to what the question is asking. On a Cisco test one of the
    questions specified a server's IP address and subnet mask then asked which
    of the four ip addresses in the answers were in the same subnet. Naturally,
    I read the question to mean "which of the IP addresses in the answers are in
    the same subnet as the server?" - otherwise, why include the information
    about the server's address / mask? The answer was, none of the ip addresses
    in the questions were in the same subnet as the server. But what the
    question was asking was, which IP addresses were in the same subnet as EACH
    OTHER! So the question was not written to test my knowedge of subnetting,
    but to deceive me into answering incorrectly. MS test questions are no
    different. On one hand, they need to mix it up so as to prevent
    "rubber-stamped" answers. But they need to be sure the questions are clear
    as to what is being asked. I still scored a 92 on the Cisco exam, so it
    wasn't the one that failed the exam for me, but I wrote in my complaint
    anyway (I figured out what they were really asking about an hour after I
    finished the exam).
     
    Kurt, Jan 4, 2006
    #5
  6. CJH

    J. Clarke Guest

    First, if you really want to know the _right_ answer, then try it and see
    what happens. Second, in any situation involving paper tests there's a
    right way, a wrong way, and a Navy way, and to pass the test you have to
    know the Navy (or in this case Microsoft) way, regardless of any logic or
    any relation to reality.

    Don't worry overly much about passing the test, worry about learning the
    system on which you are being tested.
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Hi Kurt,
    Good comments! Having been on both sides of this (being a test taker and
    being someone that works in the certification group that creates the exams),
    I can see where a lot of exams appear to be reading comprehension rather
    than knowledge of what to do in a given instance. I also appreciate the
    other comments about 3rd party tools that would be used rather than the tool
    that comes "in the box".

    We work hard with the experts that help us create exam items to make sure
    the questions are relevant and well written. A lot of times, one or two
    words in the stem (scenario) of the question make an answer right or wrong,
    so paying close attention is vital.

    For the 3rd party tools, we are measuring what capabilities are available
    with the product to manage and maintain the environment, so we cover those
    tools. While other tools may be available, we know the tools we provide will
    be available. Once you know one tool, what it is meant to do and how it does
    it, then the tool you use to perform the task becomes less significant. That
    is, the people that hire you need to know you can do those tasks regardless
    of how you do them.

    --
    --
    Andy Ruth
    Microsoft Learning

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights.
     
    Andy Ruth [MSFT], Jan 5, 2006
    #7
  8. CJH

    CJH Guest

    Right, but the wording on the explanation on this question is incorrect.
    Did you read my original post?
    My post wasn't about third-party defragmenters, but the information provided
    in the Training Kit about the built in defragmenter...and how the question
    relating to it (which I posted in my original post) is misleading because
    the explanation for the answer is wrong.

    Please re-read my original post, with the question, and tell me if I'm right
    or wrong.
     
    CJH, Jan 5, 2006
    #8
  9. Sorry, I didn't mean to reply to your concerns directly, just trying to talk
    about what we are doing in our exams. For your specific concerns, if the
    wording is incorrect on a specific question, you can comment it. We do
    review the comments and if there is a question that appears to be incorrect,
    we have an expert for that subject matter area review it and either pull the
    question from our pool of exam questions or rewrite the question to be
    technically correct.

    My comments were more to say that we cannot test on tools that do not come
    with our product and that we do not try to make questions tricky or a
    reading comprehension test.

    --
    --
    Andy Ruth
    Microsoft Learning

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights.
     
    Andy Ruth [MSFT], Jan 5, 2006
    #9
  10. CJH

    CJH Guest

    Okay, but can you explain why the practice tests in a training kit that is
    supposed to help someone pass the exam are so faulty? I've come across
    three so far. One question referred to material that wasn't even covered in
    the training kit book! I went back to look up the particular item the
    question referred to and only found one mention....and it didn't even
    include the information the question asked.

    I posted another comment about the same kit....the references in the tests
    are all to a book that isn't even included with the kit!
     
    CJH, Jan 6, 2006
    #10
  11. I can't, but can tell you the person that manages the creation of the
    training kits sits down the hall from me and I did go talk to him about
    this. That won't help you in this instance, but will make him aware and he
    will do something.

    --
    --
    Andy Ruth
    Microsoft Learning

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights.
     
    Andy Ruth [MSFT], Jan 6, 2006
    #11
  12. CJH

    CJH Guest

    Thanks. I appreciate that. I'd be interested in hearing what he has to
    say.
     
    CJH, Jan 9, 2006
    #12
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