Announcement: new DoF calculator available for download

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jens Regge, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Bandicoot wrote:

    At the time that sold goods began converting here there was a lot of worry that
    prices would go up for a real amount of goods (conspiracy theories included a
    smaller package at the same price, for example, 300ml beer sold at 341ml prices).

    The manufacturers wanted to avoid re-designing their packaging, crating, etc.,
    so maintained the same sizes... for a while both imperial and metric measures
    were on the packages (and some products are so today, esp. those that use the
    same labeling in Canada as the US... of course in that case it is in US, not
    imperial units).

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #81
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  2. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Could be... yet, beer is now sold in a variety of odd sizes, so I don't think
    anyone would have a legal problem re-sizing from 341 ml. For maketing reasons
    it would be up. Ever since the beer industry got deregulated with respect to
    markets (each province had its own breweries, for example and could not ship to
    other provinces), I think other regulations have been dropped, if not
    officially. All the governments really care about is the taxes.
    Canadian customs still operate on the notion that things are packaged in ounces.
    So oddball sizes don't fit your exemption. OTOH I've never been forced to pay
    duty when bringing in 3 declared bottles of wine. A friend claims declaring 6
    bottles without a problem.

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #82
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  3. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    I know of no mechanics (CDN/US) who do not have full metric and full imperial
    tool sets (except of course for things that originated and are only available in
    metric, such is the case I believe with TORX fasteners). Mechanics don't want
    more tools than they need, but since machines these days come from all over the
    world, they are very likely to have metric oriented parts.

    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #83
  4. That's in 2004, not 1977. North American autos still used English
    units in '77, and foreign nameplates weren't quite so popular.

    But anyway, I didn't say *automobile* mechanics. What about the folks
    who repair air conditioners, or aircraft, or elevators? I bet they
    still aren't equipped well with metric sizes.
     
    Stephen H. Westin, Oct 7, 2004
    #84
  5. Jens Regge

    Linda_N Guest

    I bought a basket of peaches the other day out of Ontario, Canada. The
    basket was a heavy cardboard with a thin wooden C handle, not conducive at
    all for stacking, but all fruit baskets seem to be shipped this way now.
    Here is the catch, the basket's measurement was '1 produce litre'. What does
    1 litre of 'solid, whole' peaches equal and how do I know if the basket was
    accurate or if I was getting more or less what I paid for? Creative
    packaging or creative usage of making markups in pricing hard for the
    consumer to figure out?

    1 advance for the consumer in using 10's is to allow even those with poor
    math skills to more easily figure out the per item cost (ie per egg, per
    peach) than using 12, 18 or 24 for instance. I can see why
    manufacturers/growers might see the harder to figure out system as being in
    their best interests.

    Linda
     
    Linda_N, Oct 7, 2004
    #85
  6. Jens Regge

    Linda_N Guest

    50mm lens? Isn't that metric hehe.

    I'm pulling your leg if you didn't catch it already.

    Linda
     
    Linda_N, Oct 7, 2004
    #86
  7. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Stephen H. Westin wrote:

    I really don't know ... but there are more and durable goods coming from
    oversees into the market here, so I expect there are more and more tradespeople
    equipped to deal with it...

    Cheers,
    Alan



    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #87
  8. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    I think it is somehwere in:
    http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/C-0.4/C.R.C.-c.285/23793.html

    I believe produce litre is the notion that if the produce' volume could be
    measured (without air gaps) it would amount to a litre in volume.

    The notion is also that it is hard for the producer to measure volumes of things
    so variable as fruit and veggies. Much easier to sell by weight.


    Where I buy most of my groceries, just below the price will be a "per 100g" (or
    others ("per litre","per Kg") so that one can easilly compare prices of things
    that are packaged differently. (Oddly, sometimes the smaller container of the
    same product is cheaper).

    Cheers,
    Alan


    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #88
  9. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest


    Can I have your photo? ... there is something more interesting on me to pull.


    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #89
  10. Jens Regge

    Big Bill Guest

    I remember (in the late 70's) having "Imperial" tools (actually
    British Standard and Whitworth), since I was one of the few willing to
    take on British bikes.
    Imperial tools just aren't needed much anymore, unless one wishes to
    work on 'antique' stuff.

    Bill Funk
    Change "g" to "a"
     
    Big Bill, Oct 7, 2004
    #90
  11. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    And, ...Airbus is mainly metric in its design and implementation of the
    aircraft. There are many exceptions to this. I'm not sure how engines differ
    when installed... the CFM's are probably metric, the Rolls-Royce I don't know,
    Pratt&Whittney and GE probably have a lot of imperial measured parts in the engine.

    I sold some nav equipment to (post apartheid) South Africa for the Rooivalk
    attack helo, and we had to modify the installation fastners from imperial to
    metric. (We used imperial fastners as that was the 'standard' for that specific
    equipment type), but of course the rest of the systems internals remained
    imperial... the functional spec for the system was metric, except for some nav
    parameters that remained traditional (Lat/Long, ft/minute for vertical vel. in
    earth coord; metric in aircraft body coord, etc.).

    This all got a bit hairy as to accomodate another program in the UK and get both
    schedules right, I mixed two factory orders together... the UK program for
    logistical reasons, remained imperial for their customer...(who already was
    operating our system on a different helo). The Quality Assurance people were
    not amused. The bean counters were apoplectic (made financials tracking
    difficult). The production manager was bug-eyed. My boss shook his head and
    mumbled a lot.

    Surprisingly, no errors occured, but the prod manager and configuration
    inspector always called on me or the engineers to come to the floor to verify
    configuration ... then of course, RSA reduced their order and we had several
    'spare' boxes with oversized threading... Happily the UK customer increased
    their order for another customer, so the boxes had to be reworked... but at
    least we weren't caught with those unsold units for the RSA (at about US$70K a
    shot).

    Cheers,
    Alan



    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 7, 2004
    #91

  12. Cost per dozen in shillings is cost per unit in pence...

    ...or did something intervene to make such simple calculations difficult?
    ;-)
     
    John Cartmell, Oct 7, 2004
    #92
  13. Jens Regge

    Colin D Guest

    LOL!!! had to explain to my wife - she heard me laughing from the other
    end of the house. Got me in trouble!

    Colin
     
    Colin D, Oct 7, 2004
    #93
  14. Yes....When I say, "Housewives", I am really referring to both
    sexes.....What I really should have said, was "Homemakers". Where I used to
    work, the machinists were proud of the fact that they could build anything
    from plans/drawings that used either system. A lot of the problem was, in
    those years, the large metal working machines, Lathes, milling machines and
    the like, were steel engraved with units in the English (Inches, and tenths
    of an inch) system. So the machine operators would have to convert to that,
    regardless of what the system was on the plans they got. These machines
    still had a lot of useful working life in them, so it would have been
    uneconomical to throw them away and buy new machines.
     
    William Graham, Oct 7, 2004
    #94
  15. They probably want to discourage people from drinking it right there at the
    border, and bringing it in, in their stomachs.......
     
    William Graham, Oct 7, 2004
    #95
  16. Jens Regge

    Bandicoot Guest

    [SNIP]
    Base 12 is much better than 10 if you want a lot of integer divisors, and
    fractions that don't go on for ever. But 60 - which the Sumerians used - is
    even better...


    Peter
     
    Bandicoot, Oct 7, 2004
    #96
  17. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest

    If you buy a socket set over here it comes with both imperial and metric
    sockets.
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 8, 2004
    #97
  18. And even on sets with wholly metric sockets, the drives are usually 3/8"
    or 1/2" square.
     
    Roger Whitehead, Oct 8, 2004
    #98
  19. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Martin_Djern=E6s?=, Oct 8, 2004
    #99
  20. Hi,

    Denmark went *to* metric in 1907, but coffee, butter and a few other
    food items are still "ordered" in pounds. Today it means that you get
    500g of what ever, but especially the people born before the second
    world war still use these measurements. So folks I would predict that
    you will have your mixup for a few years to come ;-)

    Martin
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Martin_Djern=E6s?=, Oct 8, 2004
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