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Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jens Regge, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Beer in a can? Ughhh. Sorry I don't do that. (Well, the odd can of
    Boddington's, Kilkenny and even Guinnes 'draft').
    Ah that last one is interesting. For more see:

    http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/ which has all the up to date units as well as
    hundreds of old, obscure and foreign measurements.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #41
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  2. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Velocity as a scientific or engineering measurement, perhaps (and not
    exclusively so), but for everyday measurements, km/hr is the norm here.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #42
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  3. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    New Years Eve. Well, I suppose most were indoor partying at the time... but you
    can imagine when they left parties to go home.... wow!

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #43
  4. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest


    You're confusing number base v. weights and measures.

    But on the subject of eggs: We have packages of 6,8,10,12,15,18,24 and 72 per
    package.

    Some people have two eggs every day. So why not 14 per packags?

    Some people have two eggs per week. So why not 2/package?

    Some people have two eggs, thrice per week, where there companion has one egg
    every weekday. So why not 11/package?

    The "dozen" eggs is a tradidional package that is purely arbitrary.

    In the end, it is marketing that decides what goes in a package, not tradition.
    And once over that small hurdle, then metricization makes even more sense for
    anything sold by weight, volume or length.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #44
  5. Jens Regge

    Duncan Allan Guest

    They made the change over during the mid afternoon.

    very sensibly Sweden thought that it was better to do this whilst they were
    awake and aware of the new change than to wake and find it all different.

    Duncan
     
    Duncan Allan, Oct 6, 2004
    #45
  6. Well, it looks like my memory was bad. The changeover apparently was
    September 3, 1967, at 5:00 AM. The no-drive period was much longer,
    too: at least four hours before the switch and an hour after. The
    signs were changed during that period.

    See <http://www.brianlucas.ca/roadside/>.
     
    Stephen H. Westin, Oct 6, 2004
    #46

  7. My hens contain one egg a day each, when they choose. Best way to get
    eggs. When I eat a supermarket egg I wonder what on earth it's supposed
    to be!

    David
     
    David Kilpatrick, Oct 6, 2004
    #47
  8. Mainly its popularisation. In 1670, Gabriel Mouton, of Lyon, proposed a
    decimal system of linear measurement system based on the length of one
    minute of arc of a great circle of the Earth. There's a brief biog here -
    http://www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Mouton.html . The
     
    Roger Whitehead, Oct 6, 2004
    #48
  9. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest


    A minute of arc is very nearly one (1) nautical mile, and that was the
    definition of the nautical mile (Admiralty Mile) for a long time (Mouton's
    _mille_). The current definition (since 1929) is 1852 meters (exactly).

    Cheers,
    Alan



    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #49
  10. Jens Regge

    Peter Irwin Guest

    I'm afraid it is slightly fudged. I was writing from memory.1000 ounces
    or 62.5 pounds per cubic foot is a very good approximation for back
    of the envelope calculations, but for distilled water at 62F (The
    temperature where an imperial fluid ounce weighs an ounce)
    a cubic foot is closer to 997 ounces.

    Peter.
     
    Peter Irwin, Oct 6, 2004
    #50
  11. Not at all. The traditional package is 6 eggs - 2x3 in a neat box - or a
    tray designed with alternating rows of eggs with the trays designed to
    stack vertically. You suggest an 11 eggs package. I look forward to seeing
    your design of an appropriate package and, before you start, a 4-3-4
    arrangement is a bit small for a tray and distinctly awkward as a box.

    Try looking at containers.
     
    John Cartmell, Oct 6, 2004
    #51
  12. Jens Regge

    Alan Browne Guest

    Well I'm neither surprised, nor terribly worried at a ~0.3% error.

    Cheers,
    Alan


    --

    "I told my wife the truth. I told her I was seeing a psychiatrist.
    Then she told me the truth: that she was seeing a psychiatrist,
    two plumbers, and a bartender."
    --Rodney Dangerfield (1921 - 2004).

    -- rec.photo.equipment.35mm user resource:
    -- http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.--
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 6, 2004
    #52
  13. Jens Regge

    Colin D Guest

    Aaahh, same here, there are usually three studs per sheet of wallboard,
    so we aren't as rickety as you might think {:)
    The older style was 16" centres, now it's 400mm centres. I just left out
    the middle ones for clarity, but un-clarified the post {:-(
    It's interesting that centimetres are never used, all building
    measurements are in millimetres, even for multi-metre distances, e.g.
    wallboard is 1200 x 2400mm, stud height usually 2400mm (this convention
    removes any possibility of error with decimal points). 4x2 (2x4?) timber
    is 100 x 50mm, etc.
    I gotta say, though, that 778mm is a lot easier to measure, write, and
    remember than 2ft. 6 +5/8 in. Along with this is measurement tolerance,
    usually to the nearest millimetre, which is better than to the nearest
    1/16".
    Speedos in NZ have only kph, no mph at all, and 6-digit odometers - they
    go up to 999,999 kms. I guess you could call that optimism.
    That's all metric here, 250 or 500gm butter or marge, 250-, 500-,
    750-gram, and 1-kilo blocks of cheese, 1-litre milk, etc.
    Drat. You get more beer than us then. Ours are 330ml bottles (stubbies)
    or cans, though there are some jumbo sizes around.

    Have one while you're thinking about it,

    Colin.
     
    Colin D, Oct 6, 2004
    #53
  14. Jens Regge

    Colin D Guest

    AIUI a speed limit of about 20 or 30 kph was imposed for a period as
    well, don't know how long for, though.

    Colin
     
    Colin D, Oct 6, 2004
    #54
  15. Well, we tried here in the US about 30 years ago, but 100 million Housewives
    put their collective "foot" down, and so we "backed out".....Cost us a
    bundle, too.......
     
    William Graham, Oct 7, 2004
    #55
  16. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest

    For goodness sake, if the aircraft used lbs for fuel quantity, a long standing convention,
    stick with it!
    Hmm. Not that I want to point accusations about our American friends, but if the
    aircraft had 'Boeing' written on the side would the same critism be leveled?

    I saw a documentary about the Delta (?) Airlines airbus crash where the fin snapped
    off. It showed a group of pilots who vowed to newer fly an Airbus again yet the thing
    that caused the fin to snap off was use of rapid rudder reversals which caused forces
    on the fin that exceeded its ultimate design load. Interestingly both Airbus and
    Boeing both issued edicts not to do this as exceeding the ultimate design load
    on either manufactuers aircraft was liable to break the fin off.
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 7, 2004
    #56
  17. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest

    Ye Gods! Could you imagine trying to do that over here now!
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 7, 2004
    #57
  18. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest


    If you alter the length of the metre so you can round the speed of light
    from ~2.98x10^8 m/s to 10^8 m/s the metre is then about 12 inches long...
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 7, 2004
    #58
  19. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest

    Oh goodness, hes going to decend into Feng Shui...

    Howabout more than one layer, pyramidic egg boxes?
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 7, 2004
    #59
  20. Jens Regge

    Peter Chant Guest

    Just a pet foilble of mine. km/hr probally popular as it is
    understandable in the same way that mph is. However, km is not the
    basic measurement of length nor hours that of time. Yes, I am coming
    from an engineering standpoint.

    I suppose the biggest drawback is that being 44m/s updoes not sound
    as good as being a ton up.
     
    Peter Chant, Oct 7, 2004
    #60
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