AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH, CANADIAN, or AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Proud USA Babe, Sep 22, 2003.

  1. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    In Surrey, at least, the 'ough' of 'borough' is pronounced as a short 'u' as
    in 'but'.

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Sep 30, 2003
    1. Advertisements

  2. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    On my very first visit to the US I genuinely asked a contact if I should
    pronounce the various names on display 'in the normal European way'. 'Of
    course' came the haughty reply. Whereupon their faces went blank every time
    I uttered!

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Sep 30, 2003
    1. Advertisements

  3. No -- the 'h' is there in order to be silent and make the other letters
    stand out better. Lam-pree, or lamp-ree -- I can't tell which it is any
    more.

    Matti
     
    Matti Lamprhey, Sep 30, 2003
  4. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    a.spencer3, Sep 30, 2003
  5. Proud USA Babe

    Daniel James Guest

    Good point [why didn't I think of that - it's a word I use often
    enough].

    A friend suggested "wazzer", but that seems to me to be euphemistic
    by default, and possibly also obscene? The NSOED does not list it
    but does have "wazzock (C20th, /slang/ Origin unknown): A stupid or
    annoying person" ... but that may be connected as I'm sure I'd heard
    that it was Australian slang for something much more unsavory and
    lavatorial (Oops! there we go with the euphemisms again).

    Cheers,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel James, Sep 30, 2003
  6. Proud USA Babe

    Daniel James Guest

    It can do, but more usually -- at least in (especially southern)
    BrE -- it's "burra". Voiced like the "ough" in "rough" but without
    the final fricative.

    Cheers,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel James, Sep 30, 2003
  7. Proud USA Babe

    Pat Durkin Guest

    I haven't used this variant spelling, but it can help avoid some of the
    confusion.
    "M-W Online:
    To select an entry, click on it.
    slayslew[1]slew[2]slew[3,verb]slew[4,noun]

    Main Entry: slew
    variant of SLOUGH "

    Of course, I really looked it up because of the expression " a whole slew of
    things", which I tend to spell "slough", but M-W is quite clear that this
    last word "slew" is of an entirely different etymology. Sigh.
     
    Pat Durkin, Oct 1, 2003
  8. Proud USA Babe

    Pat Durkin Guest

    I am so glad Yukon Jack asked that, and that you gave this answer. In my
    mind I had you wandering between Lamb-free , and and Lam-pray. (Gamboling
    lambs and eels on your shield.)
     
    Pat Durkin, Oct 1, 2003
  9. Yes....Pronounced, "Grenitch".....
     
    William Graham, Oct 1, 2003
  10. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    I'm sorry. I didn't realize that he was referring to the Wicked Witch
    of the West.

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Oct 1, 2003
  11. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    Oops, sorry mates. When I see "borough," I think of places like The
    Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan. OK, so I'm sometimes too US-centric.

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Oct 1, 2003
  12. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    Yes, I did wander a bit on that.
    Well, I'm from the area south of SF so I can't speak for the residents.
    However, I've always called it Del Nor-teh. That the locals can't even
    pronounce it near correct isa total abomination. Of course I also call
    that looney city to the south Loss An jell us rather than the proper
    Loess An hell ess.

    You are right about Spanish and as a native Californian, I personally
    take great pride in our Spanish heritage.

    Here's a confession: I live in Palo Alto and must admit that 99.99% of
    us calls it Pallow (like pal of mine) Alto (like the name Al). I have
    had friends in Finland for nearly 40 years and one one visit, some
    others came over for dinner. At one point I was asked where I lived in
    Calif. I answered Pallow Alto and that elicited some titters from a
    few of the English-challenged. It turns out that the way I said it
    sounded a lot like the Finnish for "fire truck."

    Quiz: What's wrong with this: "The La Brea Tar Pits"

    Bonus question: How do you pronounce La Jolla?

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Oct 1, 2003
  13. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    You know, I've gone through life (60 years) seemingly cursed with the
    spelling of my nam
     
    Yukon Jack, Oct 1, 2003
  14. Actually, it could have been a sick witch........
     
    William Graham, Oct 1, 2003
  15. Don't know......
    La Hoya.....
     
    William Graham, Oct 1, 2003
  16. Proud USA Babe

    Mark Wallace Guest

    .... which is not in any way, shape, or form related to jock itch.
     
    Mark Wallace, Oct 1, 2003
  17. Family tradition gives the 'h' some mobility -- at one time it was
    Lamphrey, and Lamprehy is on the cards for the grandchildren if they
    don't behave themselves.

    Matti
     
    Matti Lamprhey, Oct 1, 2003
  18. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    Or are you all just a load of suckers - sounds fishy to me. :))

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Oct 1, 2003
  19. Definitely. YJ says you're from Croydon -- I'm from Coulsdon, just down
    the road.

    Matti
     
    Matti Lamprhey, Oct 1, 2003
  20. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    Nah.
    A village near the new proposed County Hall if that's a clue.

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Oct 1, 2003
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.