AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH, CANADIAN, or AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Proud USA Babe, Sep 22, 2003.

  1. Neither is obscene; each is euphemistic.

    Matti
     
    Matti Lamprhey, Sep 28, 2003
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  2. They're euphemisms, both derive from French words, one for the room where
    you wash, one for the act of washing.
     
    William Black, Sep 28, 2003
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  3. Proud USA Babe

    Simon Guest

    I bow to your superior knowledge - it was a feeble attempt to point out some
    cultures refusal to use the real name ie London and Londres and various
    other aberrations
     
    Simon, Sep 28, 2003
  4. Proud USA Babe

    Simon Guest

    Water closet? (Sorry William hit the wrong icon)
     
    Simon, Sep 28, 2003
  5. Dress, William, dress. "Toile" is cloth, "toilette" is a diminutive,
    both refer to clothing.
     
    Andrew Chaplin, Sep 28, 2003
  6. I stand corrected.
     
    William Black, Sep 28, 2003
  7. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    Can't find it in my atlas.

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Sep 29, 2003
  8. Proud USA Babe

    a.spencer3 Guest

    In England, it's usually Van Goch (as in loch)
    In Dutch, I believe, it's Fun Choch

    Surreyman
     
    a.spencer3, Sep 29, 2003
  9. Proud USA Babe

    Daniel James Guest

    Hmm. We have "urinal" -- not just for the fitting but also for the
    place (as in " a public urinal") -- but it's specific to liquid
    excreta, and isn't used for "the smallest room in the house".

    Cheers,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel James, Sep 29, 2003
  10. It seems to me that "bog" might be neither euphemistic nor obscene.
    Vulgar, possibly, but that can be remedied.

    Matti
     
    Matti Lamprhey, Sep 29, 2003
  11. Beats "defecatorium" when it comes to ease of spelling.
     
    Andrew Chaplin, Sep 29, 2003
  12. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    Isn't it Greenwich?

    -YJ from Calif, the nuttiest state anywhere.
     
    Yukon Jack, Sep 30, 2003
  13. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    And three of these ways can be used with the word slough!

    To slough something off (sluff)

    To go boating in the slough (sloo)

    To visit that town near Heathrow, Slough (slao - like bough)

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Sep 30, 2003
  14. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    sounds like dough above. Same sound. The "owe" sound, like I owe some
    money.

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Sep 30, 2003
  15. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    Mark, thanks for the info. While I haven't gone through life calling
    him vain goe, thanks to a 5th grade teacher, I learned it as fan goff.
    Still a ways off, but now I've learned the correct way.

    Also, you're spot on WRT names and their pronunciation.

    I don't know about the UK but here in the US, people have really gone
    overboard trying to "customize" their names. We have all sorts of
    versions of "Brittany," Jaime comes out as Jayme (doesn't rhyme with
    Jayne or James), Susie has been transformed into "Siouxsie," Wendy has
    become Wendye, Wendie, Wendi, W'ndi, Wendee, and on and on.

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Sep 30, 2003
  16. Proud USA Babe

    Yukon Jack Guest

    "Matti Lamprhey"

    Off topic here, but I'm curious as to how you pronounce your last name.
    Is it like lamp er hay?

    -YJ
     
    Yukon Jack, Sep 30, 2003
  17. Yes, but these are spelling differences, not pronunciation
    differences...There are some pronunciation differences that I refuse to
    accept, even though their, "owners" insist on them...Example: The residents
    of a county in Northern California pronounce the name of their county (Del
    Norte) to rhyme with Mel Snort. They misspronounce the Spanish word "Norte"
    like Nort, instead of Nor-tay, as it should be pronounced....Spanish is a
    beautiful language. I refuse to pronounce it that way, residents of the
    county be damned....I ain't gonna do it!
     
    William Graham, Sep 30, 2003
  18. Proud USA Babe

    Mark Wallace Guest

    I hope everyone's familiar with this:
    http://earth.prohosting.com/mwal/m-pages/farjeon.htm
     
    Mark Wallace, Sep 30, 2003
  19. Proud USA Babe

    Mark Wallace Guest

    That's mean. Time to say sorry.
     
    Mark Wallace, Sep 30, 2003
  20. Not in English it doesn't. Sounds like the "u" in "but" - BURRU.

    Its origin is the ancient Germanic word "byrg", where the "y" is
    pronounced somewhere between the "i" in "it" and the "u" in "up", and
    the "g" is a soft almost glottal "h" rather softer than the "ch" in
    Scottish "loch". In Germany the "g" hardened to today's pronunciation
    of "Burg", but in England it survives in placenames such as
    "Loughborough" (luffbru), "Bury St Edmunds" (berry) and "Salisbury"
    (Sallsbree).

    --
    Dave OSOS#24 Remove my gerbil for email replies

    Yamaha XJ900S & Wessex sidecar, the sexy one
    Yamaha XJ900F & Watsonian Monaco, the comfortable one

    http://dswindell.members.beeb.net
     
    Dave Swindell, Sep 30, 2003
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