After calibrating monitor what to do with .icm file in Photoshop?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Editor www.nutritionsoftware.org, Nov 24, 2003.

  1. I used MonacoEZcolor to calibrate my monitor and saved the profile as an
    ..icm file.
    Do I have to tell Photoshop about this file? Or I don't have to do anything
    after calibration because Windows automatically loads it.
    Thanks.
     
    Editor www.nutritionsoftware.org, Nov 24, 2003
    #1
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  2. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Dr. J. Smith Guest

    No and no. I've never used EZcolor and I'm not sure what your OS is but
    basically you should bring up your display properties, go to color
    management and set (or load) your icm/icc profile there.
     
    Dr. J. Smith, Nov 24, 2003
    #2
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  3. I used MonacoEZcolor to calibrate my monitor and saved the profile as an
    Photoshop (and other ICC aware software) automatically use the display
    default profile (to see or change the default profile, open the
    display properties window, then select Settings/Advanced/Color
    Management. Note that Windows and non-ICC aware programs simply ignore
    the display profile.

    Another way to profile the monitor is to change the LUT table of the
    graphics card (Photoshop Adobe Gamma uses this method – it installs a
    resident program that is automatically loaded at system start-up). The
    advantage of this method is that the color adjustments are the same
    for all programs (ICC aware or not).

    I never used MonacoEZcolor, so I don't know how it works.

    Mapril Oliveira
    http://www.mapril.net - Software for Digital Photography
     
    Mapril Oliveira, Nov 24, 2003
    #3
  4. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Editor www.nutritionsoftware.org"
    Monaco will put the .icm file in the right place so that Photoshop will see it.
    To verify this, if you're using Windoze right-click on the open desktop, click
    'properties' to see the 'display properties', click the 'settings' tab, then
    'advanced', then 'color management' and you should see the Monaco generated icm
    profile as the 'default monitor profile'.

    The only way you can get screwed up with this is if you ran Adobe Gamma
    earlier, which also created a monitor profile but also created a Gamma.exe file
    that, on startup, loads the adobe .icm values into your video card LUT. Then
    the Monaco numbers get loaded on top of this and your colors will be way off.
    If you didn't run Adobe Gamma then no worries, but if you did you need to find
    the Startup file and delete the Gamma loader.exe file from it.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 24, 2003
    #4
  5. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    RM: I am not familiar with non-Photoshop calibration, but it pays to
    contemplate ~what~ calibration actually is - because it's a concept
    which many people seem not to grasp straight away. Calibration is
    necessary if we want a particular printer to produce what we see on
    the monitor.

    It is achieved by making a test print and then calibrating the
    original computer image until it looks as bad as your test print. We
    then adjust the monitor image with normal photoshop TOOLS until it
    looks right *with the appropriate calibration FOR that printer* in
    use.

    This works fine on Macs, but I don't know how well it works on PC's.

    For the best results calibration should be used for each printer, and
    ideally for various papers as well.

    Keep in mind that a Photoshop document may print beautifully on say a
    cheap inkjet printer, but may look terrible when printed on someone
    eles's printer - even a high quality colour laser printer. This
    problem is occurring daily now, because so many businesses are
    preparing their own artwork for quick laser printing at a bureau or a
    local printing company, and customers are getting some big surprises
    or shocks when they see the finished job :- (

    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 24, 2003
    #5
  6. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    MikeWhy Guest

    Photoshop and OS color management have come a long, long way since those
    days. Seriously consider reading up on color management. Nowadays, we just
    calibrate the monitor, and use the appropriate profile for the specific
    printer/paper/ink combination.
    The same concepts work on both Mac and Windows 98 and later. Photoshop has
    been color management-aware since 5.0, I believe. Perhaps earlier.
    Printer profiles minimize the surprises.
     
    MikeWhy, Nov 24, 2003
    #6
  7. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Ray Murphy"
    This is what people USED to do before the ICM color managed workflow became
    popular, and it's still used by many print shops where they know they'll only
    be printing to one press. It's a pretty worthless flow if you're outputting to
    multiple devices though.

    The ICM workflow is totally different, instead you calibrate and characterize
    each device in the color flow (printer, monitor, maybe the scanner) and
    generate an ICM profile for them. Then the color managed applications (like
    Photoshop) use these profiles to give you a better match between different
    devices by translating the color info in the file.

    http://www.color.org/ for the official web site of the ICC for those
    interested.

    Here's a good explanation of the basics by Photoshop author and guru Bruce
    Fraser ... http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html
    If you have decent profiles for each device and ink/paper combo you can
    actually soft-proof in Photoshop (V6, 7 and CS) and see in advance what you'll
    get (assuming your monitor is profiled properly too). There are fewer
    surprises using the ICM flow.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 24, 2003
    #7
  8. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    RM: Thanks for that, but not everyone has (or needs) the later
    versions of Photoshop for basic work; in fact for basic manipulation
    of digital images the non-professionals could get away with version
    2.5 or later.

    Nowadays, we just
    RM: So if a late model printer is not on the list, or the paper is new
    to the user, it doesn't work :- (
    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 24, 2003
    #8
  9. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    MikeWhy Guest

    Understood. I got a copy of Photoshop Elements with both my printer and my
    camera. If you ever get a chance, the color managed workflow saves many of
    the steps you mention.
    True enough. Not all printers support CM. You would then be stuck making
    profiles yourself, which is two or more of: expensive, laborious, or
    tiresome. There are benefits to upgrading or updating, though.
     
    MikeWhy, Nov 25, 2003
    #9
  10. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    This is what people USED to do before the ICM color managed workflow became
    popular, and it's still used by many print shops where they know they'll only
    be printing to one press. It's a pretty worthless flow if you're
    outputting to multiple devices though.[/QUOTE]

    RM: It is still however the way to calibrate manually if the desired
    results are not being obtained.
    I've never heard of anyone calibrating for a PRESS, although it sounds
    like a good idea. I know that it's often difficult to get various
    presses (or printing machinists) to replicate the super high quality
    of the colour proofs from output bureaus, but you can't bugger around
    with them and hand the printing company a lousy looking proof of the
    printing films that will *theoretically* reproduce the original
    artwork on a particular press.
    RM: There are so many factors involved here which are all very
    interesting, but we need to focus on the original poster's problem -
    with HIS particular setup. It's pointless to talk to much about
    equipment he is not using.

    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 25, 2003
    #10
  11. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Ray Murphy"
    That's what most of us did, give him tips on how to check that his .icm file
    for his calibrated monitor works. He's in a color managed work flow or he
    wouldn't be using an .icm monitor profile ... what you suggested is completely
    contrary to that workflow.
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 25, 2003
    #11
  12. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    That's what most of us did, give him tips on how to check that his .icm file
    for his calibrated monitor works. He's in a color managed work flow or he
    wouldn't be using an .icm monitor profile ... what you suggested is
    completely contrary to that workflow.[/QUOTE]

    RM: I just had another look at my original reply and found that I said
    I knew nothing about non-Photoshop calibration and was therefore not
    attempting to answer his question at all - let alone give contraary
    information. I merely mentioned manual calibration in general terms -
    particularly for other readers who had not used it and were having
    difficulty in getting decent images from their printers.

    The original question was:

    ~I used MonacoEZcolor to calibrate my monitor
    ~and saved the profile as an .icm file.
    ~Do I have to tell Photoshop about this file?
    ~Or I don't have to do anything after calibration
    ~because Windows automatically loads it.
    Did he ever get an answer? If so, I missed it in this fast-moving
    newsgroup.
    Does an .icm file automatically get sent to Photoshop on PC's and Macs
    so it can be easily selected?

    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 25, 2003
    #12
  13. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Ray Murphy"
    Yes, he got the correct answer (Monaco assigns the .icm file as the monitor
    default and he "doesn't have to do anything after calibration").
    It doesn't "automatically get sent to Photoshop", instead it is assigned as the
    default monitor profile once Monaco generates it. It isn't "easily selected",
    it's just there as the default, there is no need to select anything as the
    assignment happens in the background.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 25, 2003
    #13
  14. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    Yes, he got the correct answer (Monaco assigns the .icm file as the monitor
    default and he "doesn't have to do anything after calibration").
    It doesn't "automatically get sent to Photoshop", instead it is assigned as
    the
    default monitor profile once Monaco generates it. It isn't "easily
    selected",
    it's just there as the default, there is no need to select anything as the
    assignment happens in the background.

    Bill[/QUOTE]

    RM: Thanks, and that's the way it should be in this era.
    This of course means that if one calibrated for several printers on
    the one day, then it is the last calibration which becomes the
    default, and one would then need to "select" whichever calibration was
    needed for any given job.

    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 25, 2003
    #14
  15. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: "Ray Murphy"
    No, you are missing the entire point of modern color management. Working with
    ..icm files and profiles means you do NOT "calibrate for several printers", you
    don't calibrate the monitor for any printer at all. Instead you calibrate the
    monitor separately and the color info is stored in the .icm file.

    You calibrate each output device (in this case, printer) separately and have an
    ..icm file for each printer/paper/ink combination. Then, if you're using the
    ICM color management flow with an app that supports it (like Photoshop) the
    numbers in the data file get translated to the correct printer values for the
    different printers. When it works (when everything is accurately calibrated
    and profiled) the colors look the same from user to user and across different
    output devices.

    If you change the monitor to match a printer then the .icm file is no longer
    valid.

    You are using "calibrated" in a different context than we are. If you want to
    learn more read some of these links.

    http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html
    http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/1401a.htm
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/tech/color/icmwp.mspx
    http://www.monacosys.com/classroom/index.html

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 25, 2003
    #15
  16. Editor  www.nutritionsoftware.org

    Ray Murphy Guest

    ----------
    No, you are missing the entire point of modern color management. Working
    with
    .icm files and profiles means you do NOT "calibrate for several printers",
    you
    don't calibrate the monitor for any printer at all. Instead you calibrate
    the
    monitor separately and the color info is stored in the .icm file.

    You calibrate each output device (in this case, printer) separately and
    have an
    .icm file for each printer/paper/ink combination. Then, if you're using the
    ICM color management flow with an app that supports it (like Photoshop) the
    numbers in the data file get translated to the correct printer values for the
    different printers. When it works (when everything is accurately calibrated
    and profiled) the colors look the same from user to user and across different
    output devices.

    If you change the monitor to match a printer then the .icm file is no longer
    valid.

    You are using "calibrated" in a different context than we are. If you want
    to
    learn more read some of these links.

    http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/13605.html
    http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/1401a.htm
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/tech/color/icmwp.mspx
    http://www.monacosys.com/classroom/index.html

    Bill[/QUOTE]

    RM: Thanks for those URL's. They are certainly handy for professional
    work, but can we discuss the case of a poster on this newsgroup
    needing to improve his output on his or her colour printer.

    What IS the best way in this modern era to get one's printer to
    reproduce a more realistic colour image?

    I'm talking ~simple~ here, you know Step 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 - and a more
    accurate result is obtained.


    Ray
     
    Ray Murphy, Nov 25, 2003
    #16
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