Advice or recommendations for new p+s camera please.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Nick, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. Nick

    Nick Guest

    A good day to all.
    I know that p+s digi cams are not highly regarded here but would appreciate
    some advice.

    This is for my wife who does not have a cam.
    We are going on hols shortly and she would like a cam.

    Looking for:
    Something that will fit into her pocket/handbag/purse.
    Minimum 10mp.
    Easy to use.
    Decent lens.
    Good mechanical zoom.
    Good battery life.

    We are both quite aged, simplicity of use is essential.

    I know this is somewhat vague but any relevant advice would be appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Nick.
     
    Nick, Aug 14, 2010
    #1
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  2. Nick

    ray Guest

    I hope you're not planning to buy one "sight unseen". My advice would be
    to go to local stores (WalMart, OfficeMax, Staples if nothing else) and
    have a look. Handle them - see which one(s) feel good - see if the menu
    system makes sense.

    I'd also rethink whether you really need 10mp. Consider: 300 dpi on an
    8x10 print would be around 7mp - are you planning on printing 36x48
    posters?
     
    ray, Aug 14, 2010
    #2
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  3. Nick

    tony cooper Guest

    You've omitted some important points like cost, user skills,
    post-processing software, and purpose. If the intent is to capture
    the standard holiday snaps, just about any moderately priced Nikon or
    Canon camera will do. You won't find much, if any, difference in the
    results between brands. Despite the brand loyalty you'll see in photo
    groups, realistically the difference in output of the various brands
    and models is insignificant to the holiday shooter.

    Some cameras have more settings for user-controlled features, but if
    your wife is not interested in using anything but the "automatic"
    setting, then the extra features are not worth the extra money.
    You're going on holiday, not a course in photography, so your wife
    will probably not be interested in doing anything more than using the
    camera to capture a memory.

    Some cameras have the ability to shoot in the RAW mode, but without
    the software and software skills, there's no advantage to you.

    What will be important to her is ease of use. That means you should
    go to a store and let her handle the various models and see how they
    feel to her and how easy it is to negotiate the settings. If she
    can't figure out how to use it, the features are wasted.

    10mp is over-kill unless the intent is to produce poster-sized prints.
    *Any* current model of a major brand p&S will turn out very acceptable
    4 x 6, 5 x 7, and even 8 x 10 prints if you do end up having prints
    made.

    A camera that accepts standard AA batteries and rechargeable AA
    batteries that can be purchased from any store is much preferable to a
    camera that has a non-standard battery.

    Most important, your wife must think the camera is cute. Don't stick
    her with something that would not be her choice. If she thinks a red
    camera body is better than a silver camera body, let her have her way.

    You will have just as much success, if not more, if you simply send
    her to the store with a credit card and let her pick out what she
    likes, although you might want to suggest that she pick out any Nikon
    or any Canon. It's not that I'm against Panasonics or Olympus, or the
    other brands, it's just that either Nikon or Canon will be a good
    choice and limiting the choice to two brands makes the process easier.
     
    tony cooper, Aug 14, 2010
    #3
  4. Nick

    OG Guest

    With point and shoot cameras, it's important to let the camera find its
    focus; so it's worth emcouraging your wife to practice before you set off.
    She should aim to getting used to half-pressing the shutter and listening
    for the camera's motor as it focuses. Then increasing the pressure so the
    camera will take a pin sharp photo.

    Practice taking photos using the flash as well, including trying to take 2
    or 3 in quick succession. Sometimes it takes quite a lot longer than you
    expect to recharge the flash, but if you both know what to expect, you won't
    feel the camera is letting you down.

    I also second the idea to look for a camera with AA batteries, You can get a
    set of Hybrid rechargeables and have one set in the camera and the other set
    spare. Recharge them overnight (or in the car on the move) and you won't be
    missing shots because the batteries are dead.
     
    OG, Aug 14, 2010
    #4
  5. Nick

    Robert Coe Guest

    : A good day to all.
    : I know that p+s digi cams are not highly regarded here but would appreciate
    : some advice.
    :
    : This is for my wife who does not have a cam.
    : We are going on hols shortly and she would like a cam.
    :
    : Looking for:
    : Something that will fit into her pocket/handbag/purse.
    : Minimum 10mp.
    : Easy to use.
    : Decent lens.
    : Good mechanical zoom.
    : Good battery life.
    :
    : We are both quite aged, simplicity of use is essential.
    :
    : I know this is somewhat vague but any relevant advice would be appreciated.

    The implication in your question is that you do already have a digital camera.
    If so, you might want to consider buying your wife a camera of the same brand.
    The controls are more likely to be similar; so if either of you has occasion
    to use the other's camera, you may have an easier time adjusting to the
    difference.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 14, 2010
    #5
  6. Nick

    Scotius Guest

    Panasonic has a nice new point and shoot that has an 8 power
    optical zoom (much more than the 3 that most point and shoots come
    with, obviously).
    That will come in handy when you have a shot from farther away
    which otherwise, would be quite pixelated when you zoomed in.
    I've read that it also has quite good low light performance.
    It's also just a little more than 200 bucks, which is not bad
    at all for a camera with it's performance specifications.
    Fuji has one out now called a "bridge camera" (kind of bridges
    that gap between point and shoots and DSLRs a bit). It's got an
    incredible 30 power zoom that comes with it too. It also has a feature
    that allows you to take people out of a shot if you just want the
    architecture (takes several exposures and eliminates moving people).
    It also (and this is important if you want to print the
    pictures) shoots in RAW format, which is no more complex than shooting
    in JPG format, but the difference will be readily apparent when you
    have the images printed.
    I've heard that it's low light capability is lacking, but
    that's probably only at fairly high zoom numbers and in lessened
    light, and you know... you can't have it all with a P & S.
    It's around 400+ or so as I recall. A very good camera though.
    There's also a new Leica model which is a true compact, and is the
    only compact camera on Getty images list of approved cameras, so it
    must be pretty good, although I don't know the price.
    If you just want good shots, I'd recommend the new panasonic
    one. It'll take good shots, not break your wallet, is compact, and has
    that nice 8 power zoom.
     
    Scotius, Aug 14, 2010
    #6
  7. There's so many errors in this advice that I wouldn't even want to bother
    to start correcting them all.
     
    Outing Trolls is FUN!, Aug 14, 2010
    #7
  8. Nick

    ray Guest

    This leads me to think she'd probably much rather use a camera with a
    viewfinder instead of trying to take pictures holding the camera at arm's
    length to use the back panel LCD - that may limit your choices.
     
    ray, Aug 14, 2010
    #8
  9. Nick

    tony cooper Guest

    It is often the case with older people that holding the camera at
    arm's length is easier than trying to squint through a viewfinder.
    The arms can be moved in and out to accommodate.
     
    tony cooper, Aug 14, 2010
    #9
  10. Nick

    Ofnuts Guest

    When you have presbyopia, your arms become too short. So your choice is
    between having your glasses, and seeing the rear screen but not the
    subject, or not having them, and seeing the subject but not much in the
    rear screen. A correctly set VF is usable without glasses.
     
    Ofnuts, Aug 15, 2010
    #10
  11. Nick

    Robert Coe Guest

    : >On Sat, 14 Aug 2010 17:47:57 +0100, "Nick"
    : >
    : >>A good day to all.
    : >>I know that p+s digi cams are not highly regarded here but would appreciate
    : >>some advice.
    : >>
    : >>This is for my wife who does not have a cam.
    : >>We are going on hols shortly and she would like a cam.
    : >>
    : >>Looking for:
    : >>Something that will fit into her pocket/handbag/purse.
    : >>Minimum 10mp.
    : >>Easy to use.
    : >>Decent lens.
    : >>Good mechanical zoom.
    : >>Good battery life.
    : >>
    : >>We are both quite aged, simplicity of use is essential.
    : >>
    : >>I know this is somewhat vague but any relevant advice would be appreciated.
    : >>
    : >>Thank you,
    : >>Nick.
    : >>
    : >
    : > Panasonic has a nice new point and shoot that has an 8 power
    : >optical zoom (much more than the 3 that most point and shoots come
    : >with, obviously).
    : > That will come in handy when you have a shot from farther away
    : >which otherwise, would be quite pixelated when you zoomed in.
    : > I've read that it also has quite good low light performance.
    : > It's also just a little more than 200 bucks, which is not bad
    : >at all for a camera with it's performance specifications.
    : > Fuji has one out now called a "bridge camera" (kind of bridges
    : >that gap between point and shoots and DSLRs a bit). It's got an
    : >incredible 30 power zoom that comes with it too. It also has a feature
    : >that allows you to take people out of a shot if you just want the
    : >architecture (takes several exposures and eliminates moving people).
    : > It also (and this is important if you want to print the
    : >pictures) shoots in RAW format, which is no more complex than shooting
    : >in JPG format, but the difference will be readily apparent when you
    : >have the images printed.
    : > I've heard that it's low light capability is lacking, but
    : >that's probably only at fairly high zoom numbers and in lessened
    : >light, and you know... you can't have it all with a P & S.
    : > It's around 400+ or so as I recall. A very good camera though.
    : >There's also a new Leica model which is a true compact, and is the
    : >only compact camera on Getty images list of approved cameras, so it
    : >must be pretty good, although I don't know the price.
    : > If you just want good shots, I'd recommend the new panasonic
    : >one. It'll take good shots, not break your wallet, is compact, and
    : >has that nice 8 power zoom.
    :
    : There's so many errors in this advice that I wouldn't even want to
    : bother to start correcting them all.

    A very telling sentiment from the group's foremost fourflusher. Somebody
    finally asks the one question that you should be expected to think you're
    qualified to answer, and all you do is punt. Why am I not surprised?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 15, 2010
    #11
  12. Nick

    Bruce Guest


    You've never heard of bifocals? Varifocals?

    I have the privilege of wearing Carl Zeiss varifocals. They differ
    from other varifocals by being tailor-made for each specific design of
    frame.

    So I look through "superb Zeiss lenses" every waking hour. ;-)

    Varifocals are idea for older people who have difficulty focusing on
    near objects. Once you get used to them, which can take a few days,
    especially if you haven't worn them before, you intuitively know which
    part of the lens gives you the optimal correction for the subject
    distance you need.
     
    Bruce, Aug 15, 2010
    #12
  13. Nick

    tony cooper Guest

    That assumes a settable VF, and that depends on what model camera is
    purchased.

    I have seen older people moving the camera forward and back to see the
    screen clearly, but I've never noticed anyone who was unable to
    achieve the right distance while wearing corrective glasses. I
    suppose it could happen.
     
    tony cooper, Aug 15, 2010
    #13
  14. Nick

    J. Clarke Guest

    Why do you have to see the subject directly and in the screen? And if
    you have a real need to do that, a viewfinder doesn't help any since all
    you can see is the viewfinder.
     
    J. Clarke, Aug 15, 2010
    #14
  15. Nick

    Tim Conway Guest

    Too bad. Actually good. There's the door.
     
    Tim Conway, Aug 15, 2010
    #15
  16. Nick

    ray Guest

    'Older people' are often 'old school' - they're much more familiar with
    using a viewfinder and find it difficult to change. 'Older people', such
    as myself, also often have presbyopia - which prevents us from focusing
    closer that four feet. I can frame a picture with a viewfinder - but my
    arms are not long enough to see the damned back panel LCD.
     
    ray, Aug 15, 2010
    #16
  17. Nick

    ray Guest

    Damned if I'm going to get a set of *focals just to use the frigging
    camera! My distance vision is perfect - I walk around all day without
    glasses - but I can't focus any closer than about five feet. The
    viewfinder on my camera adapts and lets me use it effortlessly.
     
    ray, Aug 15, 2010
    #17
  18. Nick

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >>> We are both quite aged, simplicity of use is essential.
    : >
    : >This leads me to think she'd probably much rather use a camera with a
    : >viewfinder instead of trying to take pictures holding the camera at arm's
    : >length to use the back panel LCD - that may limit your choices.
    :
    : It is often the case with older people that holding the camera at
    : arm's length is easier than trying to squint through a viewfinder.
    : The arms can be moved in and out to accommodate.

    Speak for yourself, Tony. I'm quite aged myself, and a viewfinder is one of ny
    non-negotiable demands. That's one reason (of several) that I haven't bought a
    P&S since my old G-5.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 15, 2010
    #18
  19. Yet, you profess to know everything about them.

    What VALUABLE advice you must have.

    LOL!
     
    Superzooms Still Win, Aug 15, 2010
    #19
  20. Nick

    tony cooper Guest

    I shoot a Nikon that composes *only* through the viewfinder. However,
    this discussion is about a point and shoot camera and a guy who wants
    a recommendation on a brand/model for his wife for holiday snaps.

    Unless she has some sort of vision condition that makes a VF
    necessary, she can probably get along without one.
     
    tony cooper, Aug 15, 2010
    #20
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