Accessing Cisco's Restricted Content

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by JohnNews, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. JohnNews

    Memnoch Guest

    I don't think you have a leg to stand on there. No one forced you to buy their
    kit. And besides, contracts aren't that expensive, depending on what level you
    require anyway, and for the support you can get from this is well worth the
    money.
     
    Memnoch, Nov 5, 2003
    #21
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  2. JohnNews

    Jimmy Guest

    I don't see how it would be illegal. They are under no obligation
    to provide support. I don't agree with it, but I don't see how there's
    any restraint of trade or similar issue.

    FWIW, other companies in the "big" system business have had policies
    like Cisco in the past. Some still do for their "business class"
    systems. The only reason that some have changed is pressure from
    users who are getting better support from generic makers. So they
    have finally started to at least make fixes publicly available
    when they already exist.
     
    Jimmy, Nov 6, 2003
    #22
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  3. JohnNews

    Andre Beck Guest

    They may not want, but can they always enforce?

    Here in Germany, we have a base principle of exhaustion (raw translation).
    IANAL, but as far as I understand the jurisdiction, the right of a vendor
    to limit a customer in the ways he is using the product is exhausted on
    the initial sale. The customer is free to resell, without the vendor to
    be able to suddenly change game rules on that act. If the vendor is
    trying to establish contrary rules in their business policies, those
    rules simply become void. This has already smashed M$' idea of forbidding
    to resell a preinstalled Windows together with the PC on which it is
    installed, and if I'm not entirely off roads, this will apply in exactly
    the same way to used Cisco equipment. So, at least, the IOS you get with
    the box is completely legal. The selling party must, of course, destroy
    all copies of the software in order to not infringe on copyright laws
    (or, what replaces them in Germany, because jurisdiction is different
    here, too - these rights stay with the original creator and cannot be
    sold in their entirety).

    Comments from people with more insight into german or generally other than
    US law welcome. Again, IANAL and may be completely wrong. But I'd be
    rather shocked if such absurd concept would pass our law unquestioned.
     
    Andre Beck, Nov 6, 2003
    #23
  4. Another interesting point that I don't think has been brought up. Cisco's
    software license is not transferable. so I you are not buying the hardware
    from a Cisco authorized reseller, then you are running illegal software.

    As far as it being Cisco's responsibility to make sure you buy from an
    authorized reseller, is it Nike's responsibility that you bought a pair of
    conterfeit Nike's at a swap meet and the sole fell off a week later. Or if
    you by a pair of Ray Ban sunglasses form a guy out of the back of a Van at
    they make you go blind, is it Ray Ban's fault?
     
    Rusty Shackleford, Nov 6, 2003
    #24
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