Access via console connection to router.

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by AM, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. AM

    AM Guest

    Hi all,

    I apologize if I post my question in this newsgroup. I hope some of you has experienced the same
    needing and could help me.

    I must configure an 837 by remote. I have already an ISDN connection to the LAN where the router
    will be installed. I will ask my colleague (totally ignorant about router and IT) to connect the
    router to a PC via console cable. The host is windows 2000 so I hope to use telnet connection to
    reach that PC. I think to use kermit to connect to the router but as I start it the cursor jumps all
    around the display. I don't want to use any GUI interface because the channel must be used for other
    activities and GUI is too bandwidth consuming, I think.

    What do you suggest to do? I would use console control just to have the maximum control over the
    router.
    We have no modem to call (connected to the router) and manage the router via it.

    Thanks,

    Alex.
     
    AM, Jan 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. :I must configure an 837 by remote. I have already an ISDN connection to the LAN where the router
    :will be installed.

    In theory the ISDN connection can be used to configure the router.
    However, it's always good to have console access, as there is always
    a risk of lockups or of needing to make changes that result in
    temporary inconsistancies.

    :I will ask my colleague (totally ignorant about router and IT) to connect the
    :router to a PC via console cable. The host is windows 2000 so I hope to use telnet connection to
    :reach that PC.

    All I've ever gotten from Window's built-in telnet is complaints from
    the Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer about the fact that I have the
    telnet service installed. Well, thanks, and how about some instructions
    on how to -un-install it, considering that I already have the service
    disabled and MS telnet is part of the base distribution, not of any option.

    AT&T's UWIN has a useful telnet.

    Note that you will need to have the PC on the -outside- of the 837
    where it can be reached even if you manage to hang up the 837. If you
    need to go through the 837 to reach the PC then you might as well just
    configure the 837 directly through the net.

    :I think to use kermit to connect to the router but as I start it the cursor jumps all
    :around the display.

    Hmmm, I've not seen that with kermit, at least not where the terminal
    type was reasonably close.
     
    Walter Roberson, Jan 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. AM

    AM Guest

    Thanks Walter for your answer but why only in theory?
    The remote LAN is 10.162.4.0/24.
    I can reach any machine on that LAN as the ISDN router and via ISDN connection. So I thought to establish a connection
    via telnet to a telnet server on that LAN and then to connect via serial cable to the router using console cable.
    I need:

    - a program that allow me to talk to the device in pure text mode (no GUI interface - only text mode starting from a
    shell environment), this is the problem (kermit is said to run properly only in DOS environment and kermit95 starts in
    GUI mode)
    - a telnet client that allow me to connect to the PC - here I can use everything I want PuTTY, TeraTERM and so on.

    All I found over the net are programmes that allow serial connections starting with GUI interface (except kermit in DOS
    mode). I don't want that. I tried kermit when it starts the cursor jumps around the display.

    Sorry I haven't understood what you said...
    Alex.
     
    AM, Jan 31, 2005
    #3
  4. AM

    Hansang Bae Guest


    Because it's more complicated to answer and I'm thinking Walter weighed
    your post and he punted! :) You can use your ISDN as a regular phone
    dialup service. But this assumes that you have provisioned it for
    voice/analog service and not just Data. Depending on the country and
    or service, you may also need a terminal adapter. If you ALREADY have
    a terminal adapter, it may have the ability to stick a RS232 device on
    there already. But it's much much more complicated then it really
    should be.

    The faulty logic (which Walter mentioned) is that you're going through
    the router which you hope to control via telnet from the inside. So if
    you screw something up, you will not be able to connect to the console
    port. In other words, you have an *IN-BAND* setup and you really need
    an out of band setup. i.e. access to the console port is not a
    function of the ISDN line.

    Take an old PC and load up any version of stripped down Linux.


    Why the strict requirement for "text" only service? If you telnet
    session works, why do you care? For example, maybe ssh forwarding will
    do.


    --

    hsb


    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    **************************ROT13 MY ADDRESS*************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Jan 31, 2005
    #4
  5. :> > In theory the ISDN connection can be used to configure the router.


    :> Thanks Walter for your answer but why only in theory?


    :Because it's more complicated to answer and I'm thinking Walter weighed
    :your post and he punted! :)

    Sort of.

    My thinking was that a successful ISDN connection involves more
    configuration parameters, and therefore it is easier to make a
    fatal mistake that trashes the ISDN connection, leaving you with
    no access to anything. With a plain ethernet connection, there
    isn't much to go wrong: give the interface an IP address, 'no shutdown'
    it, and you are in business... at least until you start
    interactively modifying the access list that is permitting you access
    to the device ;-)
     
    Walter Roberson, Jan 31, 2005
    #5
  6. AM

    AM Guest

    Hey, hey, perhaps I lost something when I explained my situation.

    I have 2 LAN, mine and the remote linked via an ISDN connection. They work perfectly. My collegues on remote access our
    resources and viceversa. Now we are going to use VPN and we bought an ADSL access. I muast configure the router.
    So I'm thinking to access a machine (say 10.162.4.59) on the remote LAN via telnet where the router is attached by
    console cable to that 10.162.4.59. The lacking step is to connect via serial connection to the router...

    I'm looking for a programme that allows me to do that. I always found GUI terminal but Kermit (and it only declared as
    functioning without any problem in DOS mode). But using Kermit 3.15 gets crazy the cursor.

    So no ISDN problem, I think ;)

    I STIIIIIILLLLLLLLL haven't found what I'm looking for....... ;)

    Bye,
    Alex.
     
    AM, Jan 31, 2005
    #6
  7. AM

    Ivan Ostreš Guest

    Maybe you're looking in a wrong direction...

    Have you considered (if target machine is windows 2K/2K3/XP) to connect
    using terminal service client (mstsc) and then just use "normal"
    terminal program?
     
    Ivan Ostreš, Jan 31, 2005
    #7
  8. AM

    AM Guest

    You are correct but I consider mstsc too bandwidth consuming. Think if the target machine is not so
    powerful to act as terminal server. I think my problem is not too recent.How was it done in the past?

    Is it possible only if the target machine is an unix/Linux machine over which minicom can be run?
    There will be an answer to my question...

    Bye,
    Alex.
     
    AM, Jan 31, 2005
    #8
  9. AM

    Hansang Bae Guest

    AM wrote:
    [snip]
    I see. Linux should work just fine then. ssh to it then kick off a
    text based terminal program.

    But perhaps there is an easier solution. I'm assuming you have a Cisco
    router. You can connect the console cable from the AUX port of your
    ISDN router and connect it to the console port of the new ADSL router.
    You can then reverse telnet to the ADSL router. Basically, you turned
    your ISDN router into a terminal server.



    --

    hsb


    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    **************************ROT13 MY ADDRESS*************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Feb 1, 2005
    #9
  10. AM

    AM Guest

    Since the ISDN router is not mine I can not access it.
    I haven't ever thougth this solution before, because I don't know how use it. It's great.
    Just one thing. The cable needed it is a rollover cable or what? The DTE-DCE cable or not?

    Thanks,
    Alex.
     
    AM, Feb 1, 2005
    #10
  11. AM

    AM Guest

    I tried your solution on an ISDN router of mine.
    How can I do that if I would open the connection from the ISDN router?

    I set up the line aux to 9600, parity none, flow-control none.
    How can start a connection to the router on the console port?

    A friend of mine told me I must telnet to an IP of the ISDN IP to the port obtained this way:

    2000 + ID of aux line;

    Usually the ID is 65 but I didn't find that on my ISDN router. How can I see that ID?

    Thanks,
    Alex.
     
    AM, Feb 1, 2005
    #11
  12. AM

    AM Guest

    I tried your solution on an ISDN router of mine.
    How can I do that if I would open the connection from the ISDN router?

    I set up the line aux to 9600, parity none, flow-control none.
    How can start a connection to the router on the console port?

    A friend of mine told me I must telnet to an IP of the ISDN IP to the port obtained this way:

    2000 + ID of aux line;

    Usually the ID is 65 but I didn't find that on my ISDN router. How can I see that ID?

    The router on the other side is a 837 and it has not an AUX port.

    Thanks,
    Alex.
     
    AM, Feb 1, 2005
    #12
  13. AM

    Hansang Bae Guest

    You connect the Cisco rollover cable from the aux port of your router
    to the other ADSL router.


    line aux 0
    no exec
    transport input telnet

    That's it.

    show line

    --

    hsb


    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    **************************ROT13 MY ADDRESS*************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Feb 2, 2005
    #13
  14. AM

    AM Guest

    That's the problem. 837 hasn't the AUX port.
    I did it. My AUX is 5 but telnet to port 2005 doesn't function.

    Is it the same thing using a DTE to DCE cable and connecting AUX to console port?

    Alex.
     
    AM, Feb 2, 2005
    #14
  15. The command "show line" will show you which line is assigned to the AUX
    port. It varies by platform...e.g. 25xx = line 1, 26xx = line 65, 17xx =
    line 5, etc.

    Good luck and have fun!
     
    Vincent C Jones, Feb 3, 2005
    #15
  16. AM

    Hansang Bae Guest

    Then you're done I guess. Reverse telnet solution will not work.

    You can't reverse telnet *out* of the console port so it's a moot point.

    --

    hsb


    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    **************************ROT13 MY ADDRESS*************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Feb 3, 2005
    #16
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