A couple of Q's for teh Guru's

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Mr User, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. Mr User

    Mr User Guest

    1. Would the installation of a 64MB Video card impact performance on
    the system below. Note: On-board video is via shared memory.
    2. Would the installation of a PCI LAN card impact performance. Note:
    This MoBo has onboard LAN.

    System: MoBo PCChip M810LR, XP2200 (1800Ghz), 30GB UDMA5 (ATA100) HD,
    128MB PC133 RAM

    It's a play system built from left over parts and additional RAM will be
    added. I'm just curious if adding additional PCI components actually
    reduce performance or enhance it by taking some load of the installed
    RAM and CPU. It runs E-Mule and nothing else.

    3. I've been told that XP Home is restricted to 10 half open connections
    but XP Pro is not. If this is a true statement then I guess it is not
    necessary to implement the patch located at http://www.lvllord.de/ for
    XP Pro. Comments?

    TIA
     
    Mr User, Aug 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mr User

    Martik Guest

    1. Yes, it would free up main memory for system use and is probably slightly
    faster than onboard video
    BTW, multi-tasking in XP will never perform well with only 128mb, try for at
    least 192-256mb

    2. Not at all

    3. ??
     
    Martik, Aug 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mr User

    why? Guest

    Usually IIRC, adding the vid card will disable the internal video, see
    your BIOS settings / mobo manual.

    Wouldn't like to comment on using shared memory v dedicated , but
    dedicated would be better, ar at least freeing up the shared RAM to main
    memory will help as you only havew 128M.

    Most likely, both will be at least PCI 33Mhz or better.
    Fairly similar reasons as for the video, depends on the NIC, some use
    the PC to do the processing, some NICS do more processing on the NIC.
    Ar you thinking the number of connections limit , resources to the PC.
    XP Pro is 10 and XP home is 5.
    http://support.microsoft.com/?scid=kb;en-us;314882
    Or are you thinking of is the half-open tcpip limit, that may not quite
    be what you think you mean. IIRC this is another feature of Windows,
    however half-open sockets can be an indicator of an attack on the PC.
    Limiting the half-open sockets can be a safe guard.


    Article is for Server 2003 but the basics are the same,
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/columns/cableguy/cg1204.mspx
    see the section -Enhancements to TCP/IP

    http://www.paessler.com/support/kb/...imitation-on-outgoing-TCP-connection-attempts


    Where the articles mention, SYN & SYN-ACK , these come from the TCP/IP
    state diagram, 47k
    http://www.cs.odu.edu/~cs779/spring03/lectures/tcpstates.gif
    reading
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_Control_Protocol
     
    why?, Aug 31, 2006
    #3
  4. Mr User

    PeeCee Guest


    Martik

    Dedicated Video card will allways improve performance by taking over Video
    processing and releasing the shared RAM to the system.
    Whether you will see any noticeable improvement in Video performance depends
    on the Graphics card you plug in.
    An old 4 MB PCI S3 or Trident video card for example is not going to give
    you '3D Game' performance.

    Make that 384 MB of RAM or more, preferably >512 MB.
    I see many systems with 192 - 256 MB of RAM that run like 'crap' (tm) until
    the RAM is taken up to 512MB or more.

    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Aug 31, 2006
    #4
  5. Mr User

    Martik Guest

    A 64mb video card is likely very old and therefore would not improve video
    performance much over onboard

    Depends what you are doing. With 192mb I can run word, firefox (10 tabs),
    excel and a newsreader without any swapping after the initial load.
     
    Martik, Sep 1, 2006
    #5
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