802.1d and 802.11b

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Todd Blum, Jan 4, 2004.

  1. Todd Blum

    Todd Blum Guest

    Hi,

    My company has recently begun implementing wireless networks
    using Cisco equipment.

    Base on my reading, it looks like you should not use Spanning
    Tree Protocol with wireless access points, only with wireless bridges.

    I'm guessing that either (1) access points don't communicate
    with each other over the radio interface, so bridge loops are not
    possible or (2) the access points have some other method of loop
    prevention that is more appropriate to wireless networks.

    On my 1200 AP, the following is listed under the radio interface
    configuration:

    bridge-group 1 subscriber-loop-control

    What does this command do?

    Which do you think of my above assumptions is correct?

    Thanks in advance,

    Todd Blum
     
    Todd Blum, Jan 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. : Base on my reading, it looks like you should not use Spanning
    :Tree Protocol with wireless access points, only with wireless bridges.

    : I'm guessing that either (1) access points don't communicate
    :with each other over the radio interface, so bridge loops are not
    :possible

    True, but then enabling STP would at most mean some inefficiency,
    so I suspect a different explanation.

    :eek:r (2) the access points have some other method of loop
    :prevention that is more appropriate to wireless networks.

    Possibly.


    : On my 1200 AP, the following is listed under the radio interface
    :configuration:

    : bridge-group 1 subscriber-loop-control

    : What does this command do?

    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td...csspts/b12211ja/b12211cr/cr11main.htm#2469483

    Use the bridge-group subscriber-loop-control configuration
    interface command to enable loop control on virtual circuits
    associated with a bridge group. Use the no form of the command to
    disable loop control on virtual circuits associated with a bridge
    group.

    For Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) to function properly,
    subscriber-loop-control must be disabled for interfaces
    participating in STP.
     
    Walter Roberson, Jan 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Todd Blum

    Ron Bandes Guest

    According to 802.11, the access-points communicate with each other through
    the Distribution System. The workings of the DS are undefined in the
    standard; however, it is explicitly stated that the DS may either wireless
    or wired.

    Ron Bandes
    CTT, CCNP, etc.
     
    Ron Bandes, Jan 6, 2004
    #3
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