40GB drive reports 32.5GB capacity?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Bob, Oct 12, 2003.

  1. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Bought a new notebook, a Sony Vaio FRV26 which claims a 40GB drive. Looking
    at drive Properties or Windows Explorer's My Computer, it reports:

    Local Disk (C:) 13.9 GB for Total Size
    Local Disk (D:) 18.6 GB for Total Size

    That's 32.5 combined. Any suggestions on what has become of the difference
    between the 40 GB size it claims to be?

    Bob
     
    Bob, Oct 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bob

    Harrison Guest

    Sony uses a recovery partition. It's hidden from Windows.
    You can remove it and reclaim the space, according to their website.

    "To remove the recovery partition and reclaim that space on the hard
    drive, a C and D Drive Recovery must be performed using the Recovery
    CD/DVDs.

    IMPORTANT: When the Recovery Drive Options window is displayed, click
    to select the Remove the Recovery Drive option.

    NOTE: This option is not available when performing a C and D Drive
    Recovery using the VAIO® Recovery Wizard."
     
    Harrison, Oct 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. Furthermore, the "label capacity" is usually calculated as 1 GB = 1000 MB.
    In thruth, 1 GB is 1024 MB (2^10 = 1024, binary system). In the case of 40
    GB this means a difference of about 40 * 24 MB = 960 MB !!!

    Just another reason why you never get the capacity you paid for, although it
    can not be the reason for such a great loss, probably Harrison is right.
     
    Christian Kollross, Oct 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Hi. Yes, Harrison hit it. I received an email back from Sony support
    pointing out that (unbeknown to me and no doubt others), the computer does
    not come with a recovery disk(s) so they use up almost 25% of the disk
    creating a hidden recovery partition. Lovely. Nice if they would have said
    this in the advertisement. Moreover, as best I can understand their
    instructions on how to remove this recovery partition and reclaim the space,
    I have to burn or buy recovery disks, then run the recovery disks on both
    drives (C: and D:) and then choose the option to remove the recovery
    partition. But running the recovery disks will, as they point out, wipe out
    all of my existing software and data! So as I understand it, in order to
    get the disk space I paid Sony for, I have to ostensibly reformat the drives
    and wipe out my own stuff. Crazy. I have another note into them asking if
    I'm reading the instructions right because that's just nuts. I'm hoping
    "maybe" I have to run the recovery disks and I'm presented with the option
    straight away to remove the recovery partition "without" having to perform a
    recovery and wipe out all my own software installs and data. Otherwise I'd
    like to know who the moron at Sony is that made the decision to steal near a
    quarter of the drive space, not let people know about this before they buy
    the computer, and not give it back unless you wipe out all your software and
    data first.

    Cheers,
    Bob
     
    Bob, Oct 12, 2003
    #4
  5. Bob

    Harrison Guest

    I did some research on this and from what I've read, you should do one
    of two things.
    1. Return the laptop for a refund.
    2. Live with it the way it is.

    Sony does some bizarre stuff with their BIOS. I read one thread where
    a fellow wanted to remove XP and install 2000. Sony offers his laptop
    in XP or 2000, but they use a different BIOS and they will not give
    you the drivers for anything other than what's installed from the
    factory.

    In theory, this means that in a couple of years, when you want to
    install the latest MS operating system, there will not be any driver
    support from Sony.

    I'd love to see what partition magic thinks of Sony's "hidden"
    partition.
     
    Harrison, Oct 12, 2003
    #5
  6. Bob

    mdp Guest

    You might consider getting an image program, e.g. Norton Ghost, to create
    your own backups. You could even create a third partition to store it on -
    doubt you would need the entire 8GB you want to recover. I burn backup
    images to a CD(s) once a month. Cheap insurance.
     
    mdp, Oct 12, 2003
    #6
  7. Bob

    hugh jass Guest

    It's good to know this kind of information for those of us who are in the
    market for a new notebook...
    Sony sounds like one to avoid for now.
    thnx, hj.

    --
    ______________________
    please remove the obvious from my email...
    : I did some research on this and from what I've read, you should do one
    : of two things.
    : 1. Return the laptop for a refund.
    : 2. Live with it the way it is.
    :
    : Sony does some bizarre stuff with their BIOS. I read one thread where
    : a fellow wanted to remove XP and install 2000. Sony offers his laptop
    : in XP or 2000, but they use a different BIOS and they will not give
    : you the drivers for anything other than what's installed from the
    : factory.
    :
    : In theory, this means that in a couple of years, when you want to
    : install the latest MS operating system, there will not be any driver
    : support from Sony.
    :
    : I'd love to see what partition magic thinks of Sony's "hidden"
    : partition.
    :
    :
    : >: >> Furthermore, the "label capacity" is usually calculated as 1 GB = 1000
    MB.
    : >> In thruth, 1 GB is 1024 MB (2^10 = 1024, binary system). In the case of
    40
    : >> GB this means a difference of about 40 * 24 MB = 960 MB !!!
    : >>
    : >> Just another reason why you never get the capacity you paid for,
    although
    : >it
    : >> can not be the reason for such a great loss, probably Harrison is
    right.
    : >
    : >Hi. Yes, Harrison hit it. I received an email back from Sony support
    : >pointing out that (unbeknown to me and no doubt others), the computer
    does
    : >not come with a recovery disk(s) so they use up almost 25% of the disk
    : >creating a hidden recovery partition. Lovely. Nice if they would have
    said
    : >this in the advertisement. Moreover, as best I can understand their
    : >instructions on how to remove this recovery partition and reclaim the
    space,
    : >I have to burn or buy recovery disks, then run the recovery disks on both
    : >drives (C: and D:) and then choose the option to remove the recovery
    : >partition. But running the recovery disks will, as they point out, wipe
    out
    : >all of my existing software and data! So as I understand it, in order to
    : >get the disk space I paid Sony for, I have to ostensibly reformat the
    drives
    : >and wipe out my own stuff. Crazy. I have another note into them asking
    if
    : >I'm reading the instructions right because that's just nuts. I'm hoping
    : >"maybe" I have to run the recovery disks and I'm presented with the
    option
    : >straight away to remove the recovery partition "without" having to
    perform a
    : >recovery and wipe out all my own software installs and data. Otherwise
    I'd
    : >like to know who the moron at Sony is that made the decision to steal
    near a
    : >quarter of the drive space, not let people know about this before they
    buy
    : >the computer, and not give it back unless you wipe out all your software
    and
    : >data first.
    : >
    : >Cheers,
    : >Bob
    : >
    :
     
    hugh jass, Oct 12, 2003
    #7
  8. Bob

    Plato Guest

    The "moron" is the marketing dept. who was able to sell you the laptop
    for $200 less by NOT including a real XP CD because most folks shop by
    price these days, not by quality or service. You got exactly what you
    paid for. And yes, you did get the disk space you paid for.

    It's a good, a real good issue tho for anyone shopping for a laptop or
    any International Brand PC. Being informed of what procedures the major
    brands are currently employing to compete by price is good info. Thanks.
     
    Plato, Oct 13, 2003
    #8
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