350 Bridge question

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by argyle, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. argyle

    argyle Guest

    I have two buildings that I am bridging and they are about at most 250
    yards apart. We were planning on bridging 3 buildings at first so we
    are using omni-directional antennaes. The buildings have line of sight
    but one roof line is lower than the other by 10 feet or so. At first
    the bridges would associate then drop off with the "lost
    authentication" message. Then they would pick up and then go down.
    This would occur almost every minute. I then read about how the
    bridges were a little problematic. So I tried a different bridge. It
    works much better, but still drops the connection every 5 minutes or
    so for about 10 seconds. The main question I have is this. Should
    these bridges be able to pass DHCP? The clients on the non-root side
    of the bridge cannot obtain any addresses. However, if I statically
    assign them everything is ok.

    Thanks in advance.

    Trevor
     
    argyle, Dec 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. argyle

    Erik Freitag Guest


    If you look at cisco's range specs for the AP350:

    Outdoor:


    - 800 ft (244m) @ 11 Mbps


    - 2000 ft (610m) @ 1 Mbps

    You're getting close to the lower limit with your configuration at 750 ft.
    Local interference, such as an A/C vent or another transmitter can reduce
    this range. Are the APs locked at 11 Mbs? If so, they can't downshift to
    extend their range. You might want to look at directional antennae.

    Bridging doesn't affect DHCP, but is the router interface for the VLAN
    that you're bridging configured with an IP helper address? If not, that
    would prevent DHCP from working. Also, if your wireless LAN is on a
    separate VLAN, which I think is a good idea, you should make sure your
    DHCP server has a scope defined for the VLAN's subnet.
     
    Erik Freitag, Dec 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. argyle

    argyle Guest

    Erik, thank for the feedback so soon. However, I gather that you think
    I am talking about the 350 access points? Or, are you referring to a
    mode? Or a general term? I'm kind of new to the wireless game so
    excuse my ignorance. If so, I am referring to the Cisco Aironet 350
    Bridge.

    Thanks,
    Trevor
     
    argyle, Dec 16, 2004
    #3
  4. argyle

    PES Guest

    I agree, this looks like specs for ap's. I think you should be able to
    get up into the miles at 11Mb. However, I frequently experience (I
    think the terminology is) holdoffs even in a span of 300-400 yards.
    Also, the 11mb does not perform like a 10Mb ethernet network. There is
    increasingly a problem with interference in the 802.11 range that is
    adding to problems like this. However, I think there is another issue
    with dhcp. Maybe spanning tree protocol running on the switch closest
    to the clients. The bridges should pass dhcp.
     
    PES, Dec 16, 2004
    #4
  5. argyle

    Erik Freitag Guest

    The information I posted is for the AP350 workgroup bridge, as found here:

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/customer...s458/products_data_sheet09186a0080088833.html

    Is your device something ELSE called an Airport 350?
     
    Erik Freitag, Dec 16, 2004
    #5
  6. argyle

    Erik Freitag Guest

    Erik Freitag, Dec 16, 2004
    #6
  7. Walter Roberson, Dec 16, 2004
    #7
  8. argyle

    Dan Lanciani Guest

    | On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 18:29:52 -0800, Erik Freitag wrote:
    |
    | > On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 17:19:25 -0800, argyle wrote:
    | >
    | >> Erik, thank for the feedback so soon. However, I gather that you think
    | >> I am talking about the 350 access points? Or, are you referring to a
    | >> mode? Or a general term? I'm kind of new to the wireless game so
    | >> excuse my ignorance. If so, I am referring to the Cisco Aironet 350
    | >> Bridge.
    | >
    | > The information I posted is for the AP350 workgroup bridge, as found here:
    | >
    | > http://www.cisco.com/en/US/customer...s458/products_data_sheet09186a0080088833.html
    | >
    | > Is your device something ELSE called an Airport 350?
    |
    | Correction: Aironet 350. Sorry.

    I suspect the original poster was talking about a real BR350. The 350
    series Workgroup Bridge may have the most misleading name of any member
    of the Cisco/Aironet family. Not only is not a bridge in the usual sense
    (it's a renamed multi-client) but it isn't built on the same platform as
    the rest of the 350 (or even 340) series. In fact, it's the last of the
    original Aironet platforms (also used by the BSE340), running their older
    proprietary system software. On the other hand, it does use the same 350
    series radio, so the range is the same--except that they don't list the
    ranges that you would get with the kinds of antennas you might use with a
    real bridge...

    Dan Lanciani
    [email protected]*com
     
    Dan Lanciani, Dec 16, 2004
    #8
  9. argyle

    Erik Freitag Guest

    OK - that looks like the range is more like miles. Sorry for the
    misunderstaning. Why doesn't cisco just rename everything they make an
    Aironet 350?

    argyle - obviously I don't know this bridge. Maybe you have the power
    turned up too high? Or some other source of distortion?
     
    Erik Freitag, Dec 16, 2004
    #9
  10. argyle

    argyle Guest

    Again. Thanks for all the feedback. It is the Aironet 350 Bridge.
    Not the workgroup bridge. I read through some of the specs last night
    and see that it should be able to push miles. The basic config is as
    follows. Building 1 has an Internet connection coming into a
    SonicWall. The SonicWall is handing out dhcp to a handful of access
    points on the building and the root bridge. About 200 yards away is
    the second building with some other access points and the other bridge
    configured as a non-root without clients. All devices are on the same
    subnet of 192.168.25.x. If I statically assign my IP on my laptop in
    the second building I can get out to the Internet. However, I can't
    get an IP through dhcp.

    Does this info help?

    Thanks again,
    Trevor
     
    argyle, Dec 16, 2004
    #10
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