Yet another Tough Stand against Evil Internet Movie Pirates

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Modemac, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. Modemac

    Modemac Guest

    Source: Internet Movie Database

    "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."

    Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...
     
    Modemac, Nov 14, 2003
    #1
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  2. Modemac

    Goldfinger Guest

    "Modemac" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    > "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    > Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    > (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    > making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    > pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    > Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    > land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    > file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."


    So if I buy a disc from ebay which turns out to be a boot, then I'll go to
    jail for three years.
     
    Goldfinger, Nov 14, 2003
    #2
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  3. "Modemac" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    > "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    > Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    > (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    > making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    > pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    > Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    > land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    > file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >
    > Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    > "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...


    Reefer Madness...?

    This is disgusting. I wonder how many Americans know that they've committed
    felonies?

    Damnit, I wish I could remember college. We spent like a week in one of my
    criminology courses going over all the felonies most Americans commit.
    Various common forms of fraud, sodomy, things we take for granted as
    day-to-day business, all felonies. That's not even considering the dozens
    of misdemeanors most Americans commit each year. If everyone got caught,
    nearly all of us would serve time in prison.

    Thank God for inequality of justice. The only people really likely to do
    time are dark-skinned minorities, freaks, crazies and ugly people.
    Good-looking, cleancut young men are relatively safe, so long as we don't
    let anyone know that we're freaks. (Freak means "subversive political
    radical and proponent of the counter-culture" in my case, but there is an
    endless variety of "freaks" that society would like to imprison.)

    Even if a person really is in such a deep state of denial that he/she does
    not believe they have ever committed a crime, they must realize that their
    children commit crimes?

    Laws like this -- aimed at supressing an existing trend, be it drug use or
    file sharing -- are designed to criminalize a _large_ segment of the
    population. They're unenforceable, but they _are_ effective in enabling the
    system to imprison those who are not wanted in so-called civilized society:
    the dark-skinned minorities, freaks, crazies and ugly people. They do
    terrorize the clean-cut rich kids, but only as a side-effect of brazenly
    imprisoning the "scum" around them.

    If this bill passes: The few "innocents" who do time will be openly viewed
    as the "wrong criminals," and the law will be overturned or replaced with a
    highly-loopholed version as soon as the media as a whole unites in their
    belief that two many respectable citizens' children are in prison.
     
    ROTC JEEP LIST, Nov 14, 2003
    #3
  4. Modemac

    Tarla Star Guest

    Hello Baby, guess who's back on Usenet?

    Modemac wrote:
    > Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    > "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    > Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    > (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    > making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    > pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    > Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    > land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    > file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >
    > Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    > "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...



    Modemac wrote:
    > Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    > "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    > Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    > (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    > making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    > pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    > Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    > land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    > file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >
    > Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    > "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...





    Modemac wrote:

    > Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    > "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    > Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    > (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    > making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    > pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    > Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    > land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    > file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >
    > Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    > "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...
     
    Tarla Star, Nov 15, 2003
    #4
  5. Modemac

    You Guest

    On 14 Nov 2003 09:14:36 -0800, (Modemac) wrote:
    >
    >Source: Internet Movie Database
    >
    >"Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    >Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    >(Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    >making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    >pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    >Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    >land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    >file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."


    Of course entertainment industry puppet Dianne Feinstein is invlolved.
    So, under this bill if I own a tape of a movie I recorded off
    television, I am subject to jail time. Yeah, great proposal.
     
    You, Nov 15, 2003
    #5
  6. Modemac

    Wbarwell Guest

    Tarla Star wrote:

    > Hello Baby, guess who's back on Usenet?



    Negativland!






    >
    > Modemac wrote:
    >> Source: Internet Movie Database
    >>
    >> "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    >> Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    >> (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    >> making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    >> pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    >> Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    >> land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    >> file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >>
    >> Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    >> "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...

    >
    >
    > Modemac wrote:
    >> Source: Internet Movie Database
    >>
    >> "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    >> Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    >> (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    >> making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    >> pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    >> Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    >> land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    >> file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >>
    >> Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    >> "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Modemac wrote:
    >
    >> Source: Internet Movie Database
    >>
    >> "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    >> Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    >> (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    >> making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    >> pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    >> Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    >> land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    >> file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."
    >>
    >> Notice how they call this bill the "Artists' Rights" bill, not the
    >> "Protect The Status Quo" bill or the "Protect Our Profits" bill...


    --
    When I shake my killfile, I can hear them buzzing!

    Cheerful Charlie
     
    Wbarwell, Nov 15, 2003
    #6
  7. Modemac

    revjack Guest

    Tarlene!

    In alt.slack Tarla Star <> wrote:

    : Hello Baby, guess who's back on Usenet?

    Not Grantland, I hope.


    --
    ___________________
     
    revjack, Nov 15, 2003
    #7
  8. Modemac

    Modemac Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 16:04:06 +1300, Tarla Star <>
    wrote:
    >Hello Baby, guess who's back on Usenet?


    Last I'd heard, you were the first Yeti to be Ruptured up on the great
    (and disastrous) day of July 5th, 1998! I guess even the Xists can't
    hold you for very long...so now you're back, until the REAL Rupture
    takes place. (Which, of course, is July 5th, 2004!)

    --
    First Online Church of "Bob"
    http://www.modemac.com/
     
    Modemac, Nov 15, 2003
    #8
  9. Modemac

    jayembee Guest

    You <> wrote:

    >> Source: Internet Movie Database
    >>
    >> "Republican Senator John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Senator Dianne
    >> Feinstein of California plan to introduce a bipartisan bill today
    >> (Thursday) making it a felony to videotape a movie in a theater and
    >> making it easier to prosecute anyone distributing or possessing
    >> pirated videos. Under the proposed Artists' Rights and Theft
    >> Prevention Act, possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could
    >> land a person in jail for up to three years. Offering any movie on a
    >> file-sharing network would be punishable by a $250,000 fine."

    >
    > Of course entertainment industry puppet Dianne Feinstein is invlolved.
    > So, under this bill if I own a tape of a movie I recorded off
    > television, I am subject to jail time. Yeah, great proposal.


    Umm...OK, where in the above does it say that videotaping a movie
    off television would be a crime punishable by jail time?

    It says (emphasis added) "a felony to videotape a movie IN A THEATER".
    That is, it would be a felony to bring a camcorder with you to the
    movies, sit in the audience, and videotape the movie as it's being
    projected on the screen.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Nov 15, 2003
    #9
  10. Modemac

    Tarla Star Guest

    Please...he'll hear you. Write me Jack, I've missed you heaps.

    revjack wrote:

    > Tarlene!
    >
    > In alt.slack Tarla Star <> wrote:
    >
    > : Hello Baby, guess who's back on Usenet?
    >
    > Not Grantland, I hope.
    >
    >
     
    Tarla Star, Nov 15, 2003
    #10
  11. Modemac

    Trevor S Guest

    (jayembee) wrote in
    news::

    <snip>

    > Umm...OK, where in the above does it say that videotaping a movie
    > off television would be a crime punishable by jail time?


    "possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could land a person in jail
    for up to three years"

    Depends what the Court defines as a "bootlegged movie" Do you have the
    necessary license from the IP holder to record it off TV ? If not, it's
    "bootlegged"

    --
    Trevor S


    "Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth."
    -Albert Einstein
     
    Trevor S, Nov 16, 2003
    #11
  12. Modemac

    Dick Sidbury Guest

    Trevor S wrote:
    > (jayembee) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>Umm...OK, where in the above does it say that videotaping a movie
    >>off television would be a crime punishable by jail time?

    >
    >
    > "possessing a single copy of a bootlegged movie could land a person in jail
    > for up to three years"
    >
    > Depends what the Court defines as a "bootlegged movie" Do you have the
    > necessary license from the IP holder to record it off TV ? If not, it's
    > "bootlegged"
    >


    Well SCOTUS decided "Universal vs Sony" to allow personal recording of
    programs from TV is fair use. Other countries of course may have
    different laws, but in that case the proposed legislation would have not
    effect.

    dick
     
    Dick Sidbury, Nov 16, 2003
    #12
  13. Modemac

    Trevor S Guest

    Dick Sidbury <> wrote in
    news:bp8bbd$1lcn0q$-berlin.de:

    <snip>

    > Well SCOTUS decided "Universal vs Sony" to allow personal recording of
    > programs from TV is fair use.


    and the new-er digital copyright laws say it isn't :)

    --
    Trevor S


    "Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth."
    -Albert Einstein
     
    Trevor S, Nov 17, 2003
    #13
  14. Modemac

    jayembee Guest

    Trevor S <> wrote:

    > Dick Sidbury <> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Well SCOTUS decided "Universal vs Sony" to allow personal
    >> recording of programs from TV is fair use.

    >
    > and the new-er digital copyright laws say it isn't :)


    It all depends on how you're recording it. Taping a TV program with
    a VCR does not violate the DMCA, because it's not doing anything to
    bypass copy protection schemes.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Nov 17, 2003
    #14
  15. On 17 Nov 2003 07:18:21 GMT, Trevor S <> wrote:

    >Dick Sidbury <> wrote in
    >news:bp8bbd$1lcn0q$-berlin.de:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> Well SCOTUS decided "Universal vs Sony" to allow personal recording of
    >> programs from TV is fair use.

    >
    >and the new-er digital copyright laws say it isn't :)


    No, the law says that defeating digital copy protection is against the
    law.

    So current archives from telly are fine, now if a program is broadcast
    digitally, with a copy never flag, and you record it digitally, then
    therw is a problem. However if you make an analog copy without using a
    mechanism of defeating a digital copyguard, then you are fine.

    GK
     
    The Mad Doctor, Nov 17, 2003
    #15
  16. Modemac

    Dogbert Guest

    What I heard about this is it is primarily designed to stop pirated movies
    from being available before they are released for sale. For example,
    filming a movies in a theater and releasing it on the 'Net before it is
    released for sale.

    A buddy of mine downloaded a copy of LOTR:FOTR from the "Net a week before
    the DVD was released. I also heard about one that was on the 'Net before it
    was even in the theaters.

    That is also why they are no longer sending out preview copies of movies to
    film reviewers. They have to go to a private screening to see movies now.
     
    Dogbert, Nov 17, 2003
    #16
  17. Modemac

    Dogbert Guest

    That is why I don't think progtrams like DVD-XCopy are illegal. Technically
    they don't remove any of the copyright protection. It is copied intact with
    the DVD. In fact it adds an extra layer, not allowing a backup to be made
    of the backup.
     
    Dogbert, Nov 17, 2003
    #17
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