Xtra Go Large - Question and Answer.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by canon paora, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. canon paora

    canon paora Guest

    Question:
    I'm with Orcon at present and feeling tempted by your Go Large plan
    but I've heard quite a few horror stories mainly about the speeds not
    being everything you advertise. So whats the story - what's the
    slowest speed I might get with your Go Large plan?

    Answer:
    Thank you for your email.

    We are not able to advise you of what speeds you may achieve on a
    plan until it has been connected and speed tests can then be
    completed. The Xtra Broadband Go Large plan offers speeds as fast as
    your phone line allows.

    While some customers on the Go Large plan have recently had problems
    with the speed of their broadband connection, we have made
    adjustments to our network to fix it. We'll continue to monitor the
    performance of the Go Large plan very closely.

    Using the Go Large plan - Traffic management may apply to the Go
    Large plan during times of network congestion or peak times.
    Generally, peak times are likely to occur between 4pm and midnight
    each day. For more information on how Go Large works please visit
    xtra.co.nz/golarge

    For most customers, the launch of maximum speed broadband plans means
    the fastest speed they can get on their line should increase. But,
    for a small number of customers, the change may actually slow their
    connection speeds down.

    Unfortunately, we can't avoid this. It's a result of the way DSL
    technology works. Faster speeds cause more interference on phone
    lines and this, in turn, can result in slower speeds or degraded
    performance, particularly for people who live a long way from their
    phone exchange.

    There are several factors that can affect the maximum speed you can
    receive:

    · Where you live or work - The distance you are from your local
    phone
    exchange will affect your maximum connection speed. For example, if
    your home or office is within 1km of the phone exchange it's more
    likely you'll get a faster maximum speed than someone who is, say,
    4km away.
    · The wiring in your house or office - Both the length and quality
    of
    any wiring in your house or office can affect maximum connection
    speeds.
    · Your computer - Your computer and modem or router will also
    affect
    the maximum speed of your broadband connection
    · Your modem connection - How you connect your modem to your
    computer
    will affect your connection speed. For example, an Ethernet or
    Wireless connection is generally faster than a USB connection.

    As is the case with most broadband connections worldwide, yours will
    not always reach its maximum speed and the speed will also vary over
    time.

    More generally, the day-to-day speed of your broadband connection can
    also be affected by the following:

    · The time of day - If you log on during busy periods when lots of
    people are using the Internet at the same time (usually between 4pm
    to midnight) speeds are likely to be slower.
    · The websites you visit - Some websites limit the speed at which
    they send out information and sites that are further away (i.e.
    international) can be slower to download than sites hosted in New
    Zealand.
    · Sharing your connection - More than one person using the same
    connection in your home or office can slow speeds.
    · The application(s) you are using - Some applications may use all
    of the spare bandwidth or memory on your computer. You can check if
    this is the case by turning off each application that you might be
    using and then checking your speed again. Make sure you turn off any
    anti-virus software before you do this.
    · Viruses and spyware on your computer - Your computer may have
    been
    infected by viruses or other unwelcome programs like Spyware. If you
    have anti-virus or anti-spyware software, make sure the software is
    up-to-date and that you run regular scans of your computer.
    Alternatively, you can run a free scan of your computer at
    xtra.co.nz/security
    · Your Upload Speed - If you are trying to upload files while
    downloading or surfing the web, this may use all your upload capacity
    and cause slower download speeds which can also effect Web browsing.
    Downloading always utilises a certain amount of upload speed at the
    same time.
    For more information on the Go Large plan including details of the
    "Fair Use" and "Traffic Management" policies please visit
    www.xtra.co.nz/golarge or for details on Xtra Broadband speed issues
    in general www.xtra.co.nz/speed

    I hope this helps clarify what you can expect from Xtra Broadband.

    Please let us know if we can be of any further assistance and we will
    be happy to help.
    canon paora, Nov 21, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. canon paora

    whome Guest

    "canon paora" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    Question:
    I'm with Orcon at present and feeling tempted by your Go Large plan
    but I've heard quite a few horror stories mainly about the speeds not
    being everything you advertise. So whats the story - what's the
    slowest speed I might get with your Go Large plan?

    Answer:
    Thank you for your email.

    We are not able to advise you of what speeds you may achieve on a
    plan until it has been connected and speed tests can then be
    completed. The Xtra Broadband Go Large plan offers speeds as fast as
    your phone line allows.
    .............
    I hope this helps clarify what you can expect from Xtra Broadband.

    Please let us know if we can be of any further assistance and we will
    be happy to help.



    what a load of bollocks. Typical scripted response. It is rubbish - even on
    my adventure plan it has slowed down.
    whome, Nov 21, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. > Where you live or work - The distance you are from your local phone
    > exchange will affect your maximum connection speed. For example, if your
    > home or office is within 1km of the phone exchange it's more likely you'll
    > get a faster maximum speed than someone who is, say, 4km away.


    True for the Physical Speed of the DSL connection

    · The wiring in your house or office - Both the length and quality of any
    wiring in your house or office can affect maximum connection speeds.

    Also true

    > Your computer - Your computer and modem or router will also affect the
    > maximum speed of your broadband connection


    Yes. maybe. but not much

    >· Your modem connection - How you connect your modem to your computer will
    >affect your connection speed. For example, an Ethernet or Wireless
    >connection is generally faster than a USB connection.


    I've never come across this..

    > More generally, the day-to-day speed of your broadband connection can also
    > be affected by the following:


    > The time of day - If you log on during busy periods when lots of people
    > are using the Internet at the same time (usually between 4pm to midnight)
    > speeds are likely to be slower.


    Yes.. as the connections to the DSLAMS are getting overloaded as telecom on
    some exchanges doesn't seem to provision enough bandwidth to give reasonable
    speeds out of it. From what I've heard from people on Go-Large it can be
    slow all the time, but thats only what some people have said

    > The websites you visit - Some websites limit the speed at which they send
    > out information and sites that are further away (i.e. international) can
    > be slower to download than sites hosted in New Zealand.


    I've not heard of this before. The overseas sites download speed compared to
    local speeds can be caused by the latency of the connetion between NZ and
    overseas and this is more to do with the way TCP works. rather than the
    website on purpose slowing you down.

    > Sharing your connection - More than one person using the same connection
    > in your home or office can slow speeds.


    True.. 1 person can use all the BW up .

    > The application(s) you are using - Some applications may use all of the
    > spare bandwidth or memory on your computer. You can check if this is the
    > case by turning off each application that you might be using and then
    > checking your speed again. Make sure you turn off any anti-virus software
    > before you do this.


    Turn off Anti-Virus Software?? Why?

    > Viruses and spyware on your computer - Your computer may have been
    > infected by viruses or other unwelcome programs like Spyware. If you have
    > anti-virus or anti-spyware software, make sure the software is up-to-date
    > and that you run regular scans of your computer. Alternatively, you can
    > run a free scan of your computer at xtra.co.nz/security.


    Yes.. true.. but just above you said to turn off the Virus Checker :)

    > Your Upload Speed - If you are trying to upload files while downloading
    > or surfing the web, this may use all your upload capacity and cause slower
    > download speeds which can also effect Web browsing. Downloading always
    > utilises a certain amount of upload speed at the same time.


    Yes. true.. Download Speed is affected via your Upload Speed and Latency.
    Use all your Up Bandwidth up (ie sharing files on bittorrent) will make your
    download speed SLOW.

    Thanks
    Craig
    Talking for Myself
    Craig Whitmore, Nov 21, 2006
    #3
  4. On 20 Nov 2006 21:32:40 -0800, "canon paora" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >Question:
    >I'm with Orcon at present and feeling tempted by your Go Large plan
    >but I've heard quite a few horror stories mainly about the speeds not
    >being everything you advertise. So whats the story - what's the
    >slowest speed I might get with your Go Large plan?


    I was on Orcon's 256/128 Advanced plan with a 40GB cap, and was
    tempted by tales of unlimited download speed and all you can eat for
    less cash on Go Large.

    I use the internet mainly for Newsgroups and Bit Torrents.
    My current plan was a lot slower than the "slow" speeds people in this
    group were complaining about, so I thought anything would have to be
    an improvement.

    Xtra make much of "Reasonable use" for Go Large, and require you to
    limit your downloads to no more than 700MB on any one day during the
    peak hours of 4pm to midnight. They also say they "may" manage P2P
    traffic during the busy periods.

    I thought download speeds must be terrific if you have to hold
    yourself back to only 700MB in 8 hours, and traffic management is sad
    but I can put up with it if it's only during those peak periods, SO I
    SIGNED UP for Go Large.

    Now I have no complaints about the size of the pipe between me and the
    exchange. My router showed a downstream data rate of 4400kbps instead
    of the usual 320, and web pages loaded in a trice or sometimes even
    faster (a bice?).

    HOWEVER a well-seeded torrent I had been running minutes earlier
    before the cutover had suddenly shrunk to a dribble. Where it was
    streaming in at 30-31kB/sec (about max for my earlier connection) it
    suddenly shrank to about 7 kB/sec, and where it was flat-topping on my
    graph it had suddenly become broken and crinkle-cut. This state of
    things persisted throughout my time on Go Large. 700 MB in 8 hours?
    You'd be extremely lucky to get that much down in a whole day.

    NEWSGROUPS were equally suppressed. I had signed up to
    free.teranews.com because Xtra claimed there was no interest in
    newsgroups and had dropped them several months back.
    Headers and binaries from teranews had been coming in at about
    30kB/sec while I was on Orcon, but after the cutover they dropped to
    less than 5kB/sec and were broken. They arrived in tiny dribbles, and
    more often than not the download of a message or binary would time
    out!

    I was a bit upset, given my expectations from Xtra's advertising, so I
    rang them the next morning. The guy I got checked some things and then
    confirmed what I knew - there was nothing wrong with my connection.
    He said they wouldn't be managing traffic, not at 9am. I insisted they
    were, so he broke off to go speak to his boss.

    He came back on a couple of minutes later, sounding crushed. His boss
    said I had to re-read the Terms and Conditions of Go Large . Torrents
    and NNTP were on the list of traffic "managed" by Xtra, and
    "mamagement" would be done ANY TIME MY PART OF THE NETWORK WAS BUSY.
    This did not apply only during peak hours 4pm to midnight, but 24/7 !!

    I asked him, "Does this mean I can't look forward to a better download
    rate?" and he told me
    "The boss says if anyone else is downloading on your part of the
    network then that is a busy period for you, and your usage will be
    managed."

    I could see that I was shagged, so within 24 hours of going to Go
    Large I had arranged to rejoin Orcon. Xtra may charge me for the
    whole month despite me only being with them for a week, but I guess
    that's better than staying with them. Xtra's traffic management
    consists of placing a jackboot on the throat and applying weight until
    the noise stops.

    FOOTNOTE: (sorry this has been so darned long)
    Xtra's speeds stayed like that all week, except for a period from 12
    to 1pm on Sunday where torrents and Newsgroups were unconstrained for
    a whole hour. That hour was excellent, but I'm told it only happened
    because of maintenance.
    I'm now back on Orcon at about 320kbps down and 160 up, but my
    downloads are full bore. Torrents 4x faster than Xtra Go Large, and
    newsgroups 6x faster. I no complain!!

    Regards,
    Brendon
    Brendon Thompson, Nov 21, 2006
    #4
  5. On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 21:32:40 -0800, canon paora wrote:

    > For most customers, the launch of maximum speed broadband plans means
    > the fastest speed they can get on their line should increase. But,
    > for a small number of customers, the change may actually slow their
    > connection speeds down.
    >
    > Unfortunately, we can't avoid this. It's a result of the way DSL
    > technology works.


    What pure and utter stinking bullshit!

    DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.

    Telecom is covering up the fact that it simply has not got the backbone
    capacity to handle the number of full-speed DSL connections that it has
    subscribed. This is why the contention ratios are so excessively high.


    Aquilegia Alyssum

    --
    "The only way Vista client and Longhorn server would make sense
    would be if [the] company was doing a 'forklift upgrade' on its
    entire client-server infrastructure."
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Nov 21, 2006
    #5
  6. canon paora

    gavin Guest

    On Tue, 21 Nov 2006 19:18:34 +1300, "Craig Whitmore"
    <> wrote:

    >>· Your modem connection - How you connect your modem to your computer will
    >>affect your connection speed. For example, an Ethernet or Wireless
    >>connection is generally faster than a USB connection.

    >
    >I've never come across this..


    For what it is worth .....
    Before I got my broadband router I was going to get a usb broadband
    "modem" from DSE They were out of stock but offered me one that had
    been returned as no good by a previous customer. The guy assured me
    they had tested it and it was fine. Being anxious to get on line I was
    tempted until another assistant happened to mention that infact they
    had 5 or 6 that had been returned and they were all ok, it was just
    the ignorant peole who had bought them obviously did not know how to
    install them.
    Yeah right ...
    Down the road to my friendly computer shop where I learned that in
    fact there probably was nothing wrong with the modems at DSE but that
    if you had another USB device running, e.g a webcam, they were bound
    to give trouble.
    gavin, Nov 21, 2006
    #6
  7. canon paora

    David Empson Guest

    Aquilegia Alyssum <> wrote:

    > On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 21:32:40 -0800, canon paora wrote:
    >
    > > For most customers, the launch of maximum speed broadband plans means
    > > the fastest speed they can get on their line should increase. But,
    > > for a small number of customers, the change may actually slow their
    > > connection speeds down.
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, we can't avoid this. It's a result of the way DSL
    > > technology works.

    >
    > What pure and utter stinking bullshit!


    Not exactly. The claim that it is a result of the way DSL technology
    works is misleading, but it is an actual observed effect.

    A friend of mine was on a 3.5M/512 plan before the "unleashed" speeds
    were introduced, and his actual line speed (as reported by his modem)
    decreased a noticeable amount after Telecom introduced the "Max" speeds
    in October (and he was upgraded to Max/Max).

    The next bit of the original article, which you snipped, is a reasonable
    description of this particular problem:

    > > Faster speeds cause more interference on phone lines and this, in
    > > turn, can result in slower speeds or degraded performance,
    > > particularly for people who live a long way from their phone
    > > exchange.


    This is a problem related to digital crosstalk between telephone lines
    that are tied together in the same "bundle". The faster the digital
    signal is transmitted, the more noise is induced in adjacent lines. This
    has the net result that if the maximum ADSL rate is increased then some
    people will get higher performance (generally those closer to the
    exchange) and others will get lower performance (generally those further
    away from the exchange). Limiting the maximum speed for everyone in the
    same bundle (e.g. the previous 3.5 Mbps limit) results in better
    performance for the distant clients.

    There is a white paper on Telecom's web site from Alcatel which explains
    the issue in much more detail. (digging up my reference...)

    <http://www.telecom-media.co.nz/resources/adsl-performance-report-250706
    ..pdf>

    > DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    > consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.


    Yes, but it only works that well if the lines are physically separated
    to a sufficient degree to avoid crosstalk.

    > Telecom is covering up the fact that it simply has not got the backbone
    > capacity to handle the number of full-speed DSL connections that it has
    > subscribed. This is why the contention ratios are so excessively high.


    The backbone and international capacity are a separate issue, and are
    much more significant than the limitations of the local loop.

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Nov 21, 2006
    #7
  8. On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 01:08:17 +1300, David Empson wrote:

    > This is a problem related to digital crosstalk between telephone lines
    > that are tied together in the same "bundle". The faster the digital
    > signal is transmitted, the more noise is induced in adjacent lines.


    But weren't we being told that the connection from the phone to the DSLAM
    was always at full speed in any case?


    Aquilegia Alyssum

    --
    "The only way Vista client and Longhorn server would make sense
    would be if [the] company was doing a 'forklift upgrade' on its
    entire client-server infrastructure."
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Nov 21, 2006
    #8
  9. On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 01:08:17 +1300, David Empson wrote:

    >> DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    >> consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.

    >
    > Yes, but it only works that well if the lines are physically separated
    > to a sufficient degree to avoid crosstalk.


    So... Telecom should separate them!


    Aquilegia Alyssum

    --
    "The only way Vista client and Longhorn server would make sense
    would be if [the] company was doing a 'forklift upgrade' on its
    entire client-server infrastructure."
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Nov 21, 2006
    #9
  10. canon paora

    Stu Fleming Guest

    Aquilegia Alyssum wrote:
    > On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 01:08:17 +1300, David Empson wrote:
    >
    >>> DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    >>> consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.

    >> Yes, but it only works that well if the lines are physically separated
    >> to a sufficient degree to avoid crosstalk.

    >
    > So... Telecom should separate them!


    According to some independent studies, the physical line design in Otago
    was done with ISDN in mind, so it does have adequate design and
    structure to avoid or minimize this problem. Not sure if real-world
    experience reflects that or not.
    Stu Fleming, Nov 21, 2006
    #10
  11. canon paora

    Earl Grey Guest

    Aquilegia Alyssum wrote:

    >
    > DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    > consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.
    >


    No, that is its maximum speed.
    It is designed for existing lines and to degrade according to the
    distance and line conditions.
    Earl Grey, Nov 21, 2006
    #11
  12. canon paora

    Chris Lim Guest

    Brendon Thompson wrote:
    > HOWEVER a well-seeded torrent I had been running minutes earlier
    > before the cutover had suddenly shrunk to a dribble. Where it was
    > streaming in at 30-31kB/sec (about max for my earlier connection) it
    > suddenly shrank to about 7 kB/sec, and where it was flat-topping on my
    > graph it had suddenly become broken and crinkle-cut. This state of
    > things persisted throughout my time on Go Large. 700 MB in 8 hours?
    > You'd be extremely lucky to get that much down in a whole day.


    For what it's worth, I'm on Go Large and I've had a few torrents reach
    over 150kB/s since I signed up a few weeks ago (even during peak
    hours). Granted these were through private trackers, but in the recent
    months with Slingshot I considered 30kB/s good so I'm happy.

    However I have also noticed that some well-seeded torrents only go at
    around 30-40kB/s when they should be flying, so who knows. Overall
    though I'm way better off than I was with Slingshot, and without the
    data caps. As long as Xtra don't start traffic shaping any more than
    they're doing now then I think I can live with that.

    Chris
    Chris Lim, Nov 21, 2006
    #12
  13. canon paora

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Chris Lim wrote:
    > Brendon Thompson wrote:
    > > HOWEVER a well-seeded torrent I had been running minutes earlier
    > > before the cutover had suddenly shrunk to a dribble. Where it was
    > > streaming in at 30-31kB/sec (about max for my earlier connection) it
    > > suddenly shrank to about 7 kB/sec, and where it was flat-topping on
    > > my graph it had suddenly become broken and crinkle-cut. This state
    > > of things persisted throughout my time on Go Large. 700 MB in 8
    > > hours? You'd be extremely lucky to get that much down in a whole
    > > day.

    >
    > For what it's worth, I'm on Go Large and I've had a few torrents reach
    > over 150kB/s since I signed up a few weeks ago (even during peak
    > hours). Granted these were through private trackers, but in the recent
    > months with Slingshot I considered 30kB/s good so I'm happy.
    >
    > However I have also noticed that some well-seeded torrents only go at
    > around 30-40kB/s when they should be flying, so who knows. Overall
    > though I'm way better off than I was with Slingshot, and without the
    > data caps. As long as Xtra don't start traffic shaping any more than
    > they're doing now then I think I can live with that.


    More anecdotal evidence here. I'm on Go Large through Actrix and last night
    got a 3.1GB torrent in under three hours. Peak speed was hitting 340kB/s or
    more (I didn't watch the whole thing as I started it at 1am and it had
    finished when I got up to use the toilet at just after 4am). Obviously it
    was a private tracker, (based in Europe, most members are in the UK) now I'm
    faced with the job of repairing my ratio, it's only uploading at around
    9kB/s and that torrent's ratio ATM is 0.111. I just hope that enough people
    want the torrent for long enough so I can get back up over 1:1 with that
    tracker.

    That's the fastest I've ever seen data go through phone lines by far.
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Nov 22, 2006
    #13
  14. canon paora

    Old Wolf Guest

    Brendon Thompson wrote:
    > I'm now back on Orcon at about 320kbps down and 160 up, but my
    > downloads are full bore. Torrents 4x faster than Xtra Go Large, and
    > newsgroups 6x faster. I no complain!!


    I've been on Inspire.net.nz for several years now, and switched to
    Bitstream 2M/128 last year. I regularly get downloads at nearly
    200KB/sec from HTTP sites, and well-seeded torrents can range
    from about 40KB/sec up to 150KB/sec. Maybe you could give
    them a shot.
    Old Wolf, Nov 22, 2006
    #14
  15. canon paora

    Old Wolf Guest

    David Empson wrote:
    > This is a problem related to digital crosstalk between telephone lines
    > that are tied together in the same "bundle". The faster the digital
    > signal is transmitted, the more noise is induced in adjacent lines. This
    > has the net result that if the maximum ADSL rate is increased then some
    > people will get higher performance (generally those closer to the
    > exchange) and others will get lower performance (generally those further
    > away from the exchange). Limiting the maximum speed for everyone in the
    > same bundle (e.g. the previous 3.5 Mbps limit) results in better
    > performance for the distant clients.


    My question is: why bother changing the speed from 3.5M to
    "unlimited" , when it is just going to result in a worse connection
    for almost everybody? Is there actually anyone in the country
    who feels constrained by 3.5M and is unhappy that their
    connection was being limited to this speed? Where I live, the
    max line speed is only about 2.4M anyway, so it certainly
    wouldn't benefit me.
    Old Wolf, Nov 22, 2006
    #15
  16. canon paora

    El Chippy Guest

    "Aquilegia Alyssum" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 01:08:17 +1300, David Empson wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, but it only works that well if the lines are physically separated
    >> to a sufficient degree to avoid crosstalk.

    >

    or other methods of noise rejection are employed.

    > So... Telecom should separate them!
    >
    >
    > Aquilegia Alyssum


    And who would pay for ripping up several thousands of kilometers of road,
    pulling out all the old bundles of cable and replacing them? should only
    take a few years if telecom can get enough staff on the job... wouldn't cost
    much.. perhaps you personally want to start the project by paying for
    telecom to replace the bundle between your house and the exchange.. got a
    spare $30K lying around?
    El Chippy, Nov 22, 2006
    #16
  17. On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 08:27:04 +1300, Earl Grey wrote:

    >> DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    >> consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.
    >>

    >
    > No, that is its maximum speed.


    That's the speed that it is capable of consistantly capable of
    transferring data across copper phone lines within the specified distance
    from the exchange.

    Those who live within that specified distance from the exchange should get
    8mbit/s data transfer rates.


    Aquilegia Alyssum

    --
    "The only way Vista client and Longhorn server would make sense
    would be if [the] company was doing a 'forklift upgrade' on its
    entire client-server infrastructure."
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Nov 22, 2006
    #17
  18. On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 16:59:09 +1300, El Chippy wrote:

    > And who would pay for ripping up several thousands of kilometers of road,
    > pulling out all the old bundles of cable and replacing them?


    Nobody.

    Telecom could simply use the old cable to pull the new cable through the
    pipe.


    Aquilegia Alyssum

    --
    "The only way Vista client and Longhorn server would make sense
    would be if [the] company was doing a 'forklift upgrade' on its
    entire client-server infrastructure."
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Nov 22, 2006
    #18
  19. canon paora

    Earl Grey Guest

    Aquilegia Alyssum wrote:
    > On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 08:27:04 +1300, Earl Grey wrote:
    >
    >>> DSL has a design capacity of approx 8mbit/s. It is designed to work
    >>> consistantly at that speed across normal copper wire phone lines.
    >>>

    >> No, that is its maximum speed.

    >
    > That's the speed that it is capable of consistantly capable of
    > transferring data across copper phone lines within the specified distance
    > from the exchange.
    >
    > Those who live within that specified distance from the exchange should get
    > 8mbit/s data transfer rates.
    >
    >
    > Aquilegia Alyssum
    >

    Maybe they do, many live further away.
    The terms and conditions say that they get what the line will deliver.
    The spec of ADSL was developed to use existing copper, because it's a
    cheaper network.
    If the intention was to replace the network, they would replace it with
    fiber.
    Earl Grey, Nov 22, 2006
    #19
  20. canon paora

    El Chippy Guest

    "Aquilegia Alyssum" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 16:59:09 +1300, El Chippy wrote:
    >
    >> And who would pay for ripping up several thousands of kilometers of road,
    >> pulling out all the old bundles of cable and replacing them?

    >
    > Nobody.
    >
    > Telecom could simply use the old cable to pull the new cable through the
    > pipe.


    but you want the cables further spaced to prevent XT, therefore a bigger
    cable bundle..
    or you could just quit moaning and accept that ~$40/month buys you ~50kb/s
    of international bandwidth. if you want more be prepared to pay for it.
    El Chippy, Nov 23, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

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