Xtra ADSL Speed

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Jeff, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.

    Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result is
    249Kbps. Bugger,

    It is my hope that the 4000 figure was a precurser of things to come and
    that Xtra just havent finished implementing their speed increases.

    Does anyone know if this has to be done in several steps?

    Me.
     
    Jeff, Mar 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jeff

    Peter Guest

    Jeff wrote:
    > Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    > the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    > Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result
    > is 249Kbps. Bugger,


    As I understand it, there is a hardware speed relating to the link between
    your modem and the telephone exchange. The speed you get here depends on
    the length and quality of the copper wire to your house, and the quality of
    connections along the way.
    The connection bandwidth is regulated by Telecom further up the line.

    In our case, the hardware speed is typically 96 or 128 kbps (because we live
    so far from the exchange, nearly 3km) - so it doesn't matter what plan we
    buy, bandwidth is limited by that 96 or 128 kpbs connection.

    HTH

    Peter
     
    Peter, Mar 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Peter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jeff wrote:
    >> Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    >> the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    >> Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result
    >> is 249Kbps. Bugger,

    >
    > As I understand it, there is a hardware speed relating to the link between
    > your modem and the telephone exchange. The speed you get here depends on
    > the length and quality of the copper wire to your house, and the quality
    > of
    > connections along the way.
    > The connection bandwidth is regulated by Telecom further up the line.
    >
    > In our case, the hardware speed is typically 96 or 128 kbps (because we
    > live
    > so far from the exchange, nearly 3km) - so it doesn't matter what plan we
    > buy, bandwidth is limited by that 96 or 128 kpbs connection.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Peter
    >


    We are probably within 800metres to the exchange here in Kilbirnie,
    Wellington.

    Last time I bothered to have a look, the connection speed showing on my
    modem was very close to 256k which is the speed of my connection.

    As I said, I really really hope that by the time I have finished cleaning up
    around the house, I can download some files at the new speed of 3.5Kbps.

    I am willing to wait for at least another, oh maybe 10 mins :)

    Me
     
    Jeff, Mar 31, 2006
    #3
  4. On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 10:22:38 +1200, Jeff wrote:

    > Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    > the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    >
    > Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result is
    > 249Kbps. Bugger,
    >
    > It is my hope that the 4000 figure was a precurser of things to come and
    > that Xtra just havent finished implementing their speed increases.
    >
    > Does anyone know if this has to be done in several steps?


    I got a letter today from Xtra saying that they will start upgrading our
    connection from the "end of April".

    Unfortunately for me, it looks like I won't beable to get the full
    3.5Mbits anyway judging by the new speed I obtained (need a connect speed
    of around 4.4 Mbits and above to account for all the inherent overheads).
     
    Pacific Dragon, Apr 1, 2006
    #4
  5. Jeff

    Rastus Guest

    On Sat, 1 Apr 2006 10:22:38 +1200, "Jeff" <> wrote:

    >Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    >the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    >
    >Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result is
    >249Kbps. Bugger,
    >
    >It is my hope that the 4000 figure was a precurser of things to come and
    >that Xtra just havent finished implementing their speed increases.
    >
    >Does anyone know if this has to be done in several steps?
    >
    >Me.
    >

    If I understand things correctly, Xtra only provide the speed between
    themselves and our phone socket. How fast we actually download depends
    on a number of things like the speed of the site you are downloading
    from etc.
     
    Rastus, Apr 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Jeff

    colinco Guest

    In article Peter says...
    > As I understand it, there is a hardware speed relating to the link between
    > your modem and the telephone exchange. The speed you get here depends on
    > the length and quality of the copper wire to your house, and the quality of
    > connections along the way.


    Only true for the full speed business Jetstream.

    > The connection bandwidth is regulated by Telecom further up the line.


    Telecom also limit the connection speed of rate limited plans to plan
    speed plus some overhead.

    > In our case, the hardware speed is typically 96 or 128 kbps (because we live
    > so far from the exchange, nearly 3km) - so it doesn't matter what plan we
    > buy, bandwidth is limited by that 96 or 128 kpbs connection.


    3km by itself should still allow ~6M down 700k up unless there were
    problems with the line
     
    colinco, Apr 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Enkidu Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Jeff wrote:
    >
    >>Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    >>the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    >>Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result
    >>is 249Kbps. Bugger,

    >
    >
    > As I understand it, there is a hardware speed relating to the link between
    > your modem and the telephone exchange. The speed you get here depends on
    > the length and quality of the copper wire to your house, and the quality of
    > connections along the way.
    > The connection bandwidth is regulated by Telecom further up the line.
    >
    > In our case, the hardware speed is typically 96 or 128 kbps (because we live
    > so far from the exchange, nearly 3km) - so it doesn't matter what plan we
    > buy, bandwidth is limited by that 96 or 128 kpbs connection.
    >

    It should be better than that. The speed of ADSL doesn't start to drop
    off until about 2km from the exchange ADSL equipment. At 3km you should
    still manage to get about 6Mbps.

    http://www.internode.on.net/adsl2/graph/index.htm

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Apr 1, 2006
    #7
  8. Jeff

    k Guest

    Jeff wrote:
    > Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    > the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    >
    > Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result is
    > 249Kbps. Bugger,
    >
    > It is my hope that the 4000 figure was a precurser of things to come and
    > that Xtra just havent finished implementing their speed increases.
    >
    > Does anyone know if this has to be done in several steps?
    >
    > Me.
    >
    >


    Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the byte
    speed?

    Using that forumula, a 4000Kbits a second should give something along
    the lines of 500KBytes a second? My 256Kbits a second connection gives a
    maximum of 32KBytes a second transfer speed :)

    In that case, you're getting half your maximum line speed.

    Then again, I can't say I've ever seen much more than 200KBytes a second
    transfer speeds here in little old New Zealand :p
     
    k, Apr 2, 2006
    #8
  9. On Sun, 02 Apr 2006 15:56:22 +1200, k wrote:

    > Then again, I can't say I've ever seen much more than 200KBytes a second
    > transfer speeds here in little old New Zealand :p


    I used to get around 250KB/sec downloading from Microsoft servers, however
    this was an exception, not really the norm.

    --
    Regards,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Apr 2, 2006
    #9

  10. >
    > I used to get around 250KB/sec downloading from Microsoft servers, however
    > this was an exception, not really the norm.


    download.microsoft.com and other Akamaied content is Local NZ traffic

    Thanks
    Craig
     
    Craig Whitmore, Apr 2, 2006
    #10
  11. Jeff

    Enkidu Guest

    Waylon Kenning wrote:
    > On Sun, 02 Apr 2006 15:56:22 +1200, k wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Then again, I can't say I've ever seen much more than 200KBytes a second
    >>transfer speeds here in little old New Zealand :p

    >
    >
    > I used to get around 250KB/sec downloading from Microsoft servers, however
    > this was an exception, not really the norm.
    >

    I've not seen that, even when I had the full speed JetStream. Even with
    Akamai it wasn;t that fast.

    I'd not expect full rated speed unless you were connecting to a really
    close host. Every router and switch takes it's toll on bandwidth.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Apr 2, 2006
    #11
  12. Jeff

    RJ Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Jeff wrote:
    > > Got all excited this morning when I logged into my ADSL modem and checked
    > > the connection speed. It was showing at 4000 odd Kbps.
    > >
    > > Connected to an external site that tesed connection speed and the result is
    > > 249Kbps. Bugger,
    > >
    > > It is my hope that the 4000 figure was a precurser of things to come and
    > > that Xtra just havent finished implementing their speed increases.
    > >
    > > Does anyone know if this has to be done in several steps?
    > >
    > > Me.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the byte
    > speed?


    10, allow for overhead
     
    RJ, Apr 2, 2006
    #12
  13. Jeff

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Waylon Kenning wrote:
    >> On Sun, 02 Apr 2006 15:56:22 +1200, k wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Then again, I can't say I've ever seen much more than 200KBytes a
    >>> second transfer speeds here in little old New Zealand :p

    >>
    >>
    >> I used to get around 250KB/sec downloading from Microsoft servers,
    >> however this was an exception, not really the norm.
    >>

    > I've not seen that, even when I had the full speed JetStream. Even
    > with Akamai it wasn;t that fast.


    I've seen it that fast on Actrix 2M. Actually peaking above 256kB/s for
    brief moments, measured with DU Meter. It is indeed rare though.
    --
    ~Shaun~
     
    ~misfit~, Apr 2, 2006
    #13
  14. Jeff

    Peter Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > It should be better than that. The speed of ADSL doesn't start to drop
    > off until about 2km from the exchange ADSL equipment. At 3km you should
    > still manage to get about 6Mbps.


    The 3km is physical straight line distance, the copper goes around the long
    way following roads, and is just over 5km.

    > http://www.internode.on.net/adsl2/graph/index.htm


    THAT is a neat chart!
     
    Peter, Apr 2, 2006
    #14
  15. Jeff

    Enkidu Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >>It should be better than that. The speed of ADSL doesn't start to drop
    >>off until about 2km from the exchange ADSL equipment. At 3km you should
    >>still manage to get about 6Mbps.

    >
    >
    > The 3km is physical straight line distance, the copper goes around the long
    > way following roads, and is just over 5km.
    >
    >>http://www.internode.on.net/adsl2/graph/index.htm

    >
    > THAT is a neat chart!
    >

    It is isn't it? One thing it shows is that ADSL2+ is going to be a lot
    better if you are closer to the exchange and a *little* better if you
    are a good distance from it.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Apr 2, 2006
    #15
  16. Jeff

    MarkH Guest

    RJ <> wrote in
    news::

    > In article <>, says...
    >>
    >> Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the
    >> byte speed?

    >
    > 10, allow for overhead


    No, it is definitely 8. I have a 2Mb/s connection at present, if I divided
    by 10 then I would expect a maximum speed of 200 KB/s. But I can download
    2 files at once and maintain a steady 240-256 KB/s for the duration of over
    1GB of downloading. That is from US servers too!


    --
    Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
    See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 5-September-05)
    "The person on the other side was a young woman. Very obviously a
    young woman. There was no possible way she could have been mistaken
    for a young man in any language, especially Braille."
    Maskerade
     
    MarkH, Apr 2, 2006
    #16
  17. Jeff

    Peter Nield Guest

    "MarkH" <> wrote in message
    news:XSMXf.5091$...
    > RJ <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > In article <>, says...
    > >>
    > >> Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the
    > >> byte speed?

    > >
    > > 10, allow for overhead

    >
    > No, it is definitely 8. I have a 2Mb/s connection at present, if I

    divided
    > by 10 then I would expect a maximum speed of 200 KB/s. But I can download
    > 2 files at once and maintain a steady 240-256 KB/s for the duration of

    over
    > 1GB of downloading. That is from US servers too!



    I've got the 2Mbps UBS from IHUG.

    My Nokia M1122 reports the actual downstream bitrate as 2560kbps, the
    upstream as 160kbps, and is currently reporting the link speeds as 3680kbps
    down and 544kbps up:

    near-end far-end
    maximum-bitrate 3680 kbits 544 kbits
    actual-bitrate 2560 kbits 160 kbits
    noise-margin 12.5 dB 25.0 dB
    output-power 2.5 dBm 19.0 dBm
    attenuation 41.0 dB 26.5 dB
    corr-fast-fec 0 2
    corr-intl-fec 3954 23
    fail-fast-crc 0 2
    fail-intl-crc 98 2
    fail-fast-hec 0 0
    fail-intl-hec 83 1
    flaged-alarms NONE NONE
    So they (Telecom) are assuming 10 bits per byte to allow for the network
    overheads.
     
    Peter Nield, Apr 2, 2006
    #17
  18. Jeff

    Stu Fleming Guest

    MarkH wrote:
    > RJ <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >
    >>In article <>, says...
    >>
    >>>Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the
    >>>byte speed?

    >>
    >>10, allow for overhead

    >
    >
    > No, it is definitely 8. I have a 2Mb/s connection at present, if I divided
    > by 10 then I would expect a maximum speed of 200 KB/s. But I can download
    > 2 files at once and maintain a steady 240-256 KB/s for the duration of over
    > 1GB of downloading. That is from US servers too!
    >
    >


    Data transmission K (bits per second) by convention is 1000.
    Memory usage K (bits) by convention is 1024.

    So divide by 8 to get top speed.
    Then allow about 30% overhead for TCP transmission overhead from source
    to single source. If multiple streams from source to multiple sources,
    will approach 90-95% of maximum line speed, depending on tuning
    parameters on router and O/S. Then your CIR comes in to play on ADSL.
    If you get line speeds significatnly above 2Mbps, you start to need to
    worry about the effect of RTT and packet loss on the Internet that
    affects your top line speed.

    e.g. UDP datastream between two hosts on 100Mbit network, we expect to
    see 96Mbps minimum. TCP datastream on same network between same hosts
    can be anywhere between 70 and 90Mbps depending on host, NIC, TCP window
    size and so on. (Realtek 8139 NICs and Windows TCP settings are the
    bane of my life at the moment)
     
    Stu Fleming, Apr 2, 2006
    #18
  19. > RJ <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> In article <>, says...
    >>>
    >>> Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the
    >>> byte speed?

    >>
    >> 10, allow for overhead

    >
    > No, it is definitely 8. I have a 2Mb/s connection at present, if I
    > divided
    > by 10 then I would expect a maximum speed of 200 KB/s. But I can download
    > 2 files at once and maintain a steady 240-256 KB/s for the duration of
    > over
    > 1GB of downloading. That is from US servers too!
    >


    Dividing by 10 was useful on old dial up modems that sent each byte
    individually with it's own start and stop bit. Seems very outdated now.

    Steve
     
    Stephen Williams, Apr 2, 2006
    #19
  20. On Sun, 2 Apr 2006 22:27:24 +1200, "Stephen Williams"
    <> wrote:

    >> RJ <> wrote in
    >> news::
    >>
    >>> In article <>, says...
    >>>>
    >>>> Don't you divide the bit speed by 8 to roughly get an idea of the
    >>>> byte speed?
    >>>
    >>> 10, allow for overhead

    >>
    >> No, it is definitely 8. I have a 2Mb/s connection at present, if I
    >> divided
    >> by 10 then I would expect a maximum speed of 200 KB/s. But I can download
    >> 2 files at once and maintain a steady 240-256 KB/s for the duration of
    >> over
    >> 1GB of downloading. That is from US servers too!
    >>

    >
    >Dividing by 10 was useful on old dial up modems that sent each byte
    >individually with it's own start and stop bit. Seems very outdated now.
    >
    >Steve


    And very outdated on dial-up modems too. Modems have been using
    synchronous connections for a very long time now. Only 8 bits per
    byte when in synchronous (V.42) mode. The 10 or 11 bits per byte with
    start and stop bits is only for asynchronous connections.
     
    Stephen Worthington, Apr 3, 2006
    #20
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