XO laptops

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Nomen Nescio, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. Nomen Nescio

    Nomen Nescio Guest

    USA Today http://301url.com/XOlaptops

    The XO laptop is supposed to be a low-cost computer targeted at
    children in the developing world. It is low on computing power by
    modern standards, low on memory, has no hard drive and runs on Linux,
    the open-source operating system. Its nickname is "The $100 laptop,"
    although it's never been priced quite that low.

    So why did people pay as much as $600 for them on eBay, when that kind
    of money is enough to buy a much more powerful machine?

    "That's not a lot of money to have something that's interesting and
    different," Rob Enderle, a technology analyst with the Enderle Group in
    San Jose, Calif., told the San Jose Mercury News.

    But Americans can buy the machines directly from One Laptop Per Child,
    an organization dedicated to providing computers to the developing
    world, for $399 -- and half of that money goes to send another XO
    laptop to a child in the developing world.

    An eBay search this morning http://301url.com/XOeBay listed [over 30]
    XO laptops for sale, with most bids hovering around $200 -- so perhaps
    the XO boomlet was a Christmas phenomenon.
     
    Nomen Nescio, Dec 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Nomen Nescio

    Rex Ballard Guest

    On Dec 26, 1:10 pm, Nomen Nescio <> wrote:
    > USA Todayhttp://301url.com/XOlaptops
    >
    > The XO laptop is supposed to be a low-cost computer targeted at
    > children in the developing world. It is low on computing power by
    > modern standards, low on memory, has no hard drive and runs on Linux,
    > the open-source operating system. Its nickname is "The $100 laptop,"
    > although it's never been priced quite that low.


    They have been offering them on the "Get one Give one" plan for
    months.

    > So why did people pay as much as $600 for them on eBay, when that kind
    > of money is enough to buy a much more powerful machine?


    I bought one of these for my nephew. I wanted to support the OLPC
    movement, give a PC to charity, and also get a chance to actually look
    at the machine. I got it this morning, and I must say I'm quite
    impressed.

    It has enough memory to do the job, it also has some built-in flash
    memory, and has a slot for SD-RAM, which it uses as a form of
    storage. It also has 3 USB ports, which can be used to connect
    storage, keyboard, or mice. I haven't tried it with a hub.

    The nice thing is that you can use it with thumb drives to get more
    storage, as well as using it to share pictures stored on SD-RAM with
    my camera.

    I had no trouble finding and connecting to public WiFi, and even
    connected to my WEP encrypted hub. No trouble browsing, chatting, and
    I didn't have trouble viewing RSS feeds. There are also some great
    introductory programs that are perfect for 10-16 year old kids who
    want to learn a bit more about how to make the computer do things.
    There is a program to teach computer programming, and another one that
    lets you do music composition, including orchestration. I was
    originally planning on giving it to my 8 year old nephew, but now I'm
    thinking about giving it to my 17 year old nephew.

    The only thing I found a bit awkward was the keyboard. It was a bit
    small, but I haven't tried plugging in a larger keyboard yet.

    > "That's not a lot of money to have something that's interesting and
    > different," Rob Enderle, a technology analyst with the Enderle Group in
    > San Jose, Calif., told the San Jose Mercury News.


    I think most people understand that they are doing the "Get one Give
    one" but they also want the consoles in time for Christmas. I got
    mine the day after Christmas. Fortunately, the family won't be
    celebrating together until this week-end.

    > But Americans can buy the machines directly from One Laptop Per Child,
    > an organization dedicated to providing computers to the developing
    > world, for $399 -- and half of that money goes to send another XO
    > laptop to a child in the developing world.


    That's what I did, and I can certainly see where it will help a great
    deal. This isn't really a "Toy computer" at all. It has real
    computer capabilities, but it's small enough to be carried easily,
    light enough to be carried like a book, and it uses a small power
    supply to charge a battery pack that will power it for a few hours.

    > An eBay search this morninghttp://301url.com/XOeBaylisted [over 30]
    > XO laptops for sale, with most bids hovering around $200 -- so perhaps
    > the XO boomlet was a Christmas phenomenon.


    The other "Hot Item" was the ASUS Eee 4G. It was very similar, a
    small screen, simple Linux system, and full capabilities, but more
    like a cross between a PDA and a Laptop, for about $400.

    Rex
     
    Rex Ballard, Dec 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. Nomen Nescio

    Joel Koltner Guest

    "Rex Ballard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The other "Hot Item" was the ASUS Eee 4G. It was very similar, a
    > small screen, simple Linux system, and full capabilities, but more
    > like a cross between a PDA and a Laptop, for about $400.


    I'd say it's just as much a "real" PC as the OLPC machine is. It's certainly
    as powerful as most laptops were, say, 3-5 years ago.

    I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's internet
    tablet, the N800.
     
    Joel Koltner, Dec 26, 2007
    #3
  4. On 2007-12-26 18:22:39 -0500, "Joel Koltner"
    <> said:

    > "Rex Ballard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> The other "Hot Item" was the ASUS Eee 4G. It was very similar, a
    >> small screen, simple Linux system, and full capabilities, but more
    >> like a cross between a PDA and a Laptop, for about $400.

    >
    > I'd say it's just as much a "real" PC as the OLPC machine is. It's certainly
    > as powerful as most laptops were, say, 3-5 years ago.
    >
    > I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's internet
    > tablet, the N800.



    I just got an eee pc, awesome little machine!
     
    Phoon Hencman, Dec 27, 2007
    #4
  5. Nomen Nescio

    alt Guest

    On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 19:50:47 -0500, Phoon Hencman wrote:

    > On 2007-12-26 18:22:39 -0500, "Joel Koltner"
    > <> said:
    >
    >> "Rex Ballard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:597a52ef-b7da-494a-

    ...
    >>> The other "Hot Item" was the ASUS Eee 4G. It was very similar, a
    >>> small screen, simple Linux system, and full capabilities, but more
    >>> like a cross between a PDA and a Laptop, for about $400.

    >>
    >> I'd say it's just as much a "real" PC as the OLPC machine is. It's
    >> certainly as powerful as most laptops were, say, 3-5 years ago.
    >>
    >> I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's
    >> internet tablet, the N800.

    >
    >
    > I just got an eee pc, awesome little machine!


    I've had mine for a few months now. I still love it!
     
    alt, Dec 27, 2007
    #5
  6. Nomen Nescio

    Me Guest

    "Nomen Nescio" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > USA Today http://301url.com/XOlaptops
    >
    > The XO laptop is supposed to be a low-cost computer targeted at
    > children in the developing world. It is low on computing power by
    > modern standards, low on memory, has no hard drive and runs on Linux,
    > the open-source operating system. Its nickname is "The $100 laptop,"
    > although it's never been priced quite that low.
    >
    > So why did people pay as much as $600 for them on eBay, when that kind
    > of money is enough to buy a much more powerful machine?
    >
    > "That's not a lot of money to have something that's interesting and
    > different," Rob Enderle, a technology analyst with the Enderle Group in
    > San Jose, Calif., told the San Jose Mercury News.
    >
    > But Americans can buy the machines directly from One Laptop Per Child,
    > an organization dedicated to providing computers to the developing
    > world, for $399 -- and half of that money goes to send another XO
    > laptop to a child in the developing world.
    >
    > An eBay search this morning http://301url.com/XOeBay listed [over 30]
    > XO laptops for sale, with most bids hovering around $200 -- so perhaps
    > the XO boomlet was a Christmas phenomenon.
    >


    its not as if they are going to play games or do high volume number
    crunching.

    I understood they were just to allow the users to surf the internet to see
    what the world is doing..............or not doing as the case may be.
     
    Me, Dec 27, 2007
    #6
  7. Nomen Nescio

    Thufir Guest

    On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 15:22:39 -0800, Joel Koltner wrote:


    > I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's
    > internet tablet, the N800.


    Ahh, the symmetry of that competition -- either one is a win for the
    Linux platform :)



    -Thufir
     
    Thufir, Dec 27, 2007
    #7
  8. Nomen Nescio

    BillW50 Guest

    In news:hBIcj.20054$DP1.7006@pd7urf2no,
    Thufir typed on Thu, 27 Dec 2007 07:35:41 GMT:
    > On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 15:22:39 -0800, Joel Koltner wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's
    >> internet tablet, the N800.

    >
    > Ahh, the symmetry of that competition -- either one is a win for the
    > Linux platform :)


    Linux will never win until devices comes with Linux drivers. And I have
    been waiting 16 years for that to happen. I don't see that happening
    until Linux goes commercial like Windows. And even Linus Tovalds claims
    in his book, he even uses Windows. I myself would run Linux here on my
    laptops, except I don't want to turn my laptops into glorified PDAs.

    --
    Bill
     
    BillW50, Dec 27, 2007
    #8
  9. Nomen Nescio

    Bigguy Guest

    Phoon Hencman wrote:
    > On 2007-12-26 18:22:39 -0500, "Joel Koltner"
    > <> said:
    >
    >> "Rex Ballard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> The other "Hot Item" was the ASUS Eee 4G. It was very similar, a
    >>> small screen, simple Linux system, and full capabilities, but more
    >>> like a cross between a PDA and a Laptop, for about $400.

    >>
    >> I'd say it's just as much a "real" PC as the OLPC machine is. It's
    >> certainly
    >> as powerful as most laptops were, say, 3-5 years ago.
    >>
    >> I think the real competition to the Eee PC is something like Nokia's
    >> internet
    >> tablet, the N800.

    >
    >
    > I just got an eee pc, awesome little machine!
    >

    EeePc is great - the more I use it the more I like it. Highly
    customisable, lots of apps available, solid build, truly portable, and
    has a restore partition.

    GB£220 delivered is a bit more than '$100' but worth it for true
    portability.

    There is surely a (large?) market out there for truly portable laptops
    for small bucks...

    I think PCs have taken a wrong turn somewhere - ever more powerful
    hardware running ever slower, bloatware. Apart from gaming do you really
    need 4-5GHz of processor(s) + 2GB RAM... for internet and Office?

    OK you need it to run Vista but no-one 'wants' to run Vista, they want
    internet access, email, Office etc.

    My old 900MHz 768MB Thinkpad is really zippy running Linux - imagine
    what a modern laptop would run like with a 'slimmer' version of XP...

    Ahh, I must be getting old...


    Guy
     
    Bigguy, Dec 28, 2007
    #9
  10. Nomen Nescio

    Linonut Guest

    * Bigguy fired off this tart reply:

    > I think PCs have taken a wrong turn somewhere - ever more powerful
    > hardware running ever slower, bloatware. Apart from gaming do you really
    > need 4-5GHz of processor(s) + 2GB RAM... for internet and Office?


    Bigger hardware means bigger revenues.

    Ever-bloating Microsoft software means bigger revenues.

    > OK you need it to run Vista but no-one 'wants' to run Vista, they want
    > internet access, email, Office etc.
    >
    > My old 900MHz 768MB Thinkpad is really zippy running Linux - imagine
    > what a modern laptop would run like with a 'slimmer' version of XP...
    >
    > Ahh, I must be getting old...


    And wise!

    I used to use a Sun workstation that ran on 32 Mb of RAM.

    --
    Tux rox!
     
    Linonut, Dec 28, 2007
    #10
  11. Nomen Nescio

    Rex Ballard Guest

    On Dec 27, 10:51 am, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    > Innews:hBIcj.20054$DP1.7006@pd7urf2no,
    > Thufir typed on Thu, 27 Dec 2007 07:35:41 GMT:
    > > On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 15:22:39 -0800, Joel Koltner wrote:

    >
    > Linux will never win until devices comes with Linux drivers. And I have
    > been waiting 16 years for that to happen. I don't see that happening
    > until Linux goes commercial like Windows. And even Linus Tovalds claims
    > in his book, he even uses Windows. I myself would run Linux here on my
    > laptops, except I don't want to turn my laptops into glorified PDAs.


    Actually, most devices now have Linux drivers. In fact the majority
    of all PCs made by major OEMs are now "Linux Ready", meaning that the
    most popular distributions, such as SUSE, Ubuntu, and Fedora, can be
    installed in less than 30 minutes. Most other commercial
    distributions, including PCLinuxOS, Linspire, and other LSB3 standard
    distributions will also self-install within less than 30 minutes.



    > --
    > Bill
     
    Rex Ballard, Dec 30, 2007
    #11
  12. Nomen Nescio

    BillW50 Guest

    In
    news:,
    Rex Ballard typed on Sun, 30 Dec 2007 10:51:58 -0800 (PST):
    > On Dec 27, 10:51 am, "BillW50" <> wrote:
    >> Innews:hBIcj.20054$DP1.7006@pd7urf2no,
    >> Thufir typed on Thu, 27 Dec 2007 07:35:41 GMT:
    >>> On Wed, 26 Dec 2007 15:22:39 -0800, Joel Koltner wrote:

    >>
    >> Linux will never win until devices comes with Linux drivers. And I
    >> have been waiting 16 years for that to happen. I don't see that
    >> happening until Linux goes commercial like Windows. And even Linus
    >> Tovalds claims in his book, he even uses Windows. I myself would run
    >> Linux here on my laptops, except I don't want to turn my laptops
    >> into glorified PDAs.

    >
    > Actually, most devices now have Linux drivers. In fact the majority
    > of all PCs made by major OEMs are now "Linux Ready", meaning that the
    > most popular distributions, such as SUSE, Ubuntu, and Fedora, can be
    > installed in less than 30 minutes. Most other commercial
    > distributions, including PCLinuxOS, Linspire, and other LSB3 standard
    > distributions will also self-install within less than 30 minutes.


    I wish! My KW-TVUSB506RF-PRO is dead without a Windows OS running. My
    vTech USB 7200 phone is dead under Linux. My iRiver T10s can't access
    the subscription service under Linux. My Aston Shell doesn't run under
    Linux. And on and on. To run Linux here, I have to dumb down everything
    I am doing now. And that doesn't make any sense to me whatsoever. I
    realize some people don't mind dumbing their systems down, but I do. As
    I have paid a lot of money for this stuff and I don't want to be without
    them.

    --
    Bill
    email: change kom to com
     
    BillW50, Dec 30, 2007
    #12
  13. Nomen Nescio

    Rex Ballard Guest

    On Dec 28, 10:05 am, Linonut <> wrote:
    > * Bigguy fired off this tart reply:
    >
    > > I think PCs have taken a wrong turn somewhere - ever more powerful
    > > hardware running ever slower, bloatware. Apart from gaming do you really
    > > need 4-5GHz of processor(s) + 2GB RAM... for internet and Office?

    >
    > Bigger hardware means bigger revenues.
    >
    > Ever-bloating Microsoft software means bigger revenues.
    >
    > > OK you need it to run Vista but no-one 'wants' to run Vista, they want
    > > internet access, email, Office etc.

    >
    > > My old 900MHz 768MB Thinkpad is really zippy running Linux - imagine
    > > what a modern laptop would run like with a 'slimmer' version of XP...


    Slimmer than what, XP? Windows 2000 needed 128 megabytes of RAM.
    Windows NT 4.0 needed 64 megabytes of RAM.

    Keep in mind that you can also use thumb drives or external USB drives
    for archives, but 4GB IN ADDITION to the Flash RAM used for the OS and
    core applications is quite a bit when it's what you are working on
    "right now".

    > > Ahh, I must be getting old...

    >
    > And wise!
    >
    > I used to use a Sun workstation that ran on 32 Mb of RAM.


    I remember using a SPArC/10 Workstation that had only 8 Mb of RAM, 512
    megabyte hard drive, and a 10 MIPS (roughly equal to 16 Mhz 80386).

    When you look at these OLPC and EEE laptops, with 256 Mb of RAM, 2 Gig
    of FLASH, SD-RAM slots easily capable of supporting 4G, and external
    USB "sticks" that can hold 8 Gigabytes in Flash RAM or 160 Gigabytes
    in USB drives at SATA speed, it's pretty easy to see that these are
    anything but "toy" computers.

    Still, even Windows XP would be very cramped in that environment,
    while Linux can easily work beautifully. Windows 2000 might fit, but
    most of the applications would be tricky.

    Linux on the other hand, often runs as a VMWare Client, and often with
    as little as 128 Mb of allocated storage on XP machines, and still
    runs quite elegantly, even with KDE and Office.

    > Tux rox!


    We really need to find a way to get the "Linux Brand" more firmly
    established. ASUS is including Linux with their motherboards, but
    there is no mandate to display the Linux trademarks or logos on the
    packaging. There OEMs are forced to get prior written approval from
    Microsoft on any promotional materials, including packaging, that uses
    the Microsoft trademarks and logos. Microsoft generally approves ads
    and packaging that is exclusively Microsoft and makes no mention of
    competitors almost immediately. On the other hand, when a
    competitor's product is mentioned, or included, it is often not
    approved in time for the deadlines required by the publishers and
    printers. Most of the time, there is a "Plan A" promotion that is
    "Microsoft and competitors", and a "Plan B" promotion which is
    "Microsoft Only". The "Plan B" gets approved immediately, but Plan A
    seems to have to go through legal, then marketing, then negotiation,
    then other delays, and never quite gets approved in time for the
    deadline.

    Apple has found a very simple way to avoid such things, by simply
    eliminating the use of the word Microsoft in all of their promotional
    materials. They simply have someone who looks similar to Bill Gates
    (glasses, heavy, brown suit), and make refereces to his "PC" without
    actually mentioning Microsoft. They seem to have even gotten away
    with the term "Vista" since it's a generic term, like Windows.

    The bigger problem for Linux is that it STILL isn't showing up on
    retailer shelves. We still can't go to Wall-mart or Staples or even
    Best Buy and look at a Linux powered computer. Unfortunately, the
    "Linux Ready" on retailer shelves look just like the other $600 laptop
    or $300 desktop sitting next to it, because they are only shown with
    Windows.

    What I do find interesting is that the "Linux Ready" machines are
    still commanding premiums of as much as 20-30% even though they are
    not shown with Linux.

    I'd like to see OLPC and other Linux "appliances" showing up on the
    retail shelves, but so far, even the appliances that are showing up
    are not promoting Linux in any way shape or form. The vendors seem
    more than happy to take advantage of Linux and it's extraordinary
    capabilities, but they seem to be completely unwilling to even provide
    the slightest mention of Linux and it's contributors in their finished
    product.

    Rex Ballard
    http://www.open4success.org
     
    Rex Ballard, Dec 31, 2007
    #13
  14. Nomen Nescio

    Joel Koltner Guest

    "Rex Ballard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The vendors seem
    > more than happy to take advantage of Linux and it's extraordinary
    > capabilities, but they seem to be completely unwilling to even provide
    > the slightest mention of Linux and it's contributors in their finished
    > product.


    I sympathize with you, Rex, but I suspect that most marketing surveys show
    that the mention "Linux" to most consumers creates FUD is there's any reaction
    at all... so they figure it's better to just not mention it... and of course
    Linux advocates will quickly find out which devices use it anyway.
     
    Joel Koltner, Dec 31, 2007
    #14
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