Wrap computer components in bubble wrap?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Ickshka, May 1, 2006.

  1. Ickshka

    Ickshka Guest

    Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap computer
    components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in ordinary
    plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped securely
    in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I hear, are
    very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely to damage them
    through static or any other way?

    Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?

    Cheers!
    Ickshka, May 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. On Mon, 01 May 2006 23:27:03 +1200, Ickshka wrote:

    > Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap computer
    > components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in ordinary
    > plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped
    > securely in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I
    > hear, are very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely to
    > damage them through static or any other way?
    >
    > Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?
    >
    > Cheers!


    Place the components in anti-static bags before you bubble wrap them.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Chuck Lysaght, May 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Ickshka

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-01, Ickshka <> wrote:
    > Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap computer
    > components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in ordinary
    > plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped securely
    > in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I hear, are
    > very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely to damage them
    > through static or any other way?
    >
    > Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?
    >
    > Cheers!


    There are special packaging materials designed for electronic components -
    when you buy new items, they are packed properly. Electronics shops
    should have suitable bags and packaging.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 1, 2006
    #3
  4. Ickshka

    phrogee Guest

    "Ickshka" <> wrote in message
    news:ggm5g.6926$...
    > Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap computer
    > components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in ordinary
    > plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped
    > securely
    > in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I hear, are
    > very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely to damage
    > them
    > through static or any other way?
    >
    > Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?
    >
    > Cheers!
    >
    >
    >


    Even anti-static bags are not 100% fail-safe from static charges, although
    your best bet.

    --
    phrogee
    phrogee, May 1, 2006
    #4
  5. Ickshka

    Vanguard Guest

    "Chuck Lysaght" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 01 May 2006 23:27:03 +1200, Ickshka wrote:
    >
    >> Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap
    >> computer
    >> components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in
    >> ordinary
    >> plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped
    >> securely in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as
    >> I
    >> hear, are very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap
    >> likely to
    >> damage them through static or any other way?
    >>
    >> Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for
    >> postage?
    >>
    >> Cheers!

    >
    > Place the components in anti-static bags before you bubble wrap them.



    Except if the bubble wrap is in contact with the pink anti-static bag
    around the electronic component then a pink anti-static bag is
    insufficient. You need to use a conductive anti-static bag so any
    static from outside, like from the cheap bubble wrap, gets transferred
    within the bag and not through the bag. They look like "foil" bags
    (i.e., they are silver colored) or black bags (i.e., they have a
    carbonized pattern). You could also use the pink anti-static bubble
    wrap so you don't have to worry about conducting static away from a
    silver colored bagged component; i.e., don't generate the static in the
    first place (which requires using a better anti-static bag to short it
    away from the component) but provide enough thickness to increase the
    dielectic potential needed to arc across the pink bubble wrap. Ideally
    you should use pink anti-static bubble wrap (so it doesn't generate
    static from friction during movement) along with a silver or black
    anti-static bag and use a cardboard box (rather than, say, a plastic
    coated padded envelope) for best protection.

    See:
    http://ebay.about.com/od/completingtransaction1/a/ct_packing.htm
    http://www.mnsi.net/~boucher/ESD.htm (see "Preventing ESD At Home"
    section)

    Just because it says "anti-static" doesn't mean it will prevent static
    damage. It just means the material itself won't generate static charges
    from friction but does nothing to protect the packaged item from static
    that is produced from other materials outside that non-static producing
    pink material. Use a silver or black anti-static bag for the component
    and the pink wrap around it.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    Post replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    For e-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#VN" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
    Vanguard, May 1, 2006
    #5
  6. On Mon, 01 May 2006 09:46:57 -0500, Vanguard wrote:

    > Subject: Re: Wrap computer components in bubble wrap?
    > From: "Vanguard" <>
    > Newsgroups: 24hoursupport.helpdesk
    > Date: Mon, 1 May 2006 09:46:57 -0500
    >
    > "Chuck Lysaght" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Mon, 01 May 2006 23:27:03 +1200, Ickshka wrote:
    >>
    >>> Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap
    >>> computer
    >>> components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in
    >>> ordinary
    >>> plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped
    >>> securely in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I
    >>> hear, are very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely
    >>> to
    >>> damage them through static or any other way?
    >>>
    >>> Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?
    >>>
    >>> Cheers!

    >>
    >> Place the components in anti-static bags before you bubble wrap them.

    >
    >
    > Except if the bubble wrap is in contact with the pink anti-static bag
    > around the electronic component then a pink anti-static bag is
    > insufficient. You need to use a conductive anti-static bag


    That's what the **** I was talking about.
    --

    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    Chuck Lysaght, May 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Ickshka

    Vanguard Guest

    "Chuck Lysaght" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Vanguard wrote:
    >
    >> "Chuck Lysaght" wrote ...
    >>> On Mon, 01 May 2006 23:27:03 +1200, Ickshka wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap
    >>>> computer
    >>>> components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in
    >>>> ordinary
    >>>> plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped
    >>>> securely in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components,
    >>>> as I
    >>>> hear, are very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap
    >>>> likely
    >>>> to
    >>>> damage them through static or any other way?
    >>>>
    >>>> Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for
    >>>> postage?
    >>>
    >>> Place the components in anti-static bags before you bubble wrap
    >>> them.

    >>
    >>
    >> Except if the bubble wrap is in contact with the pink anti-static bag
    >> around the electronic component then a pink anti-static bag is
    >> insufficient. You need to use a conductive anti-static bag

    >
    > That's what the **** I was talking about.



    Your generic "anti-static bags" statement doesn't say WHICH type to use,
    pink or silver/black. You also never mentioned using anti-static pink
    bubble wrap. What "the ****" you *meant* to say isn't what you said
    because you never did say it.
    Vanguard, May 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Ickshka

    Real Name: Guest

    Hi,

    Anything that conducts
    electricity will work.
    Aluminum foil ?
    The silvery plastic bags are
    made for circuitry, and they're
    pretty tough, and waterproof, but
    you can make do with lots of things;
    if you're creative.

    Ken .





    On Mon, 1 May 2006 23:27:03 +1200,
    "Ickshka" <>
    wrote:

    >Ok so I'm a beginner at this. My question is, is it ok to wrap computer
    >components, such as a video card or a stick of ram, directly in ordinary
    >plastic bubble wrap? I want to send them through the post wrapped securely
    >in bubble wrap and placed in a box. Computer components, as I hear, are
    >very sensitive to static electricity so is bubble wrap likely to damage them
    >through static or any other way?
    >
    >Any advice on a better way to wrap my computer components for postage?
    >
    >Cheers!
    >
    >
    Real Name:, May 5, 2006
    #8
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