WPA2 capability of built in adapters

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Jeff@unknown.com, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. Guest

    My laptop uses XP SP3 and has a built in wireless adapter. The laptop docs
    are long gone.

    I know the adapter handles WPA-PSK well because I've used it for years.
    Other than trial and error (I hate to mess up the presently working
    network), is there a way to determine if it can also handle WPA-AES (which
    my router can)?

    When I go to the laptop's "Network Connections", it is listed as a
    "Intel (R) PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network"

    When I click on my connected home wlan "properties", it shows all options
    available including:
    WPA-PSK, WPA2, WPA2-PSK as well as encryption by either TKIP and AES.

    Does that mean the adapter has those capabilities or are these just the
    capabilities of the Windows XP OS?

    Thanks.

    Jeff
     
    , Jul 28, 2008
    #1
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  2. Pavel A. Guest

    The 3945 supports all these capabilities.
    Just check that the driver is updated.

    Regards,
    --PA

    wrote:
    > My laptop uses XP SP3 and has a built in wireless adapter. The laptop docs
    > are long gone.
    >
    > I know the adapter handles WPA-PSK well because I've used it for years.
    > Other than trial and error (I hate to mess up the presently working
    > network), is there a way to determine if it can also handle WPA-AES (which
    > my router can)?
    >
    > When I go to the laptop's "Network Connections", it is listed as a
    > "Intel (R) PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network"
    >
    > When I click on my connected home wlan "properties", it shows all options
    > available including:
    > WPA-PSK, WPA2, WPA2-PSK as well as encryption by either TKIP and AES.
    >
    > Does that mean the adapter has those capabilities or are these just the
    > capabilities of the Windows XP OS?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
     
    Pavel A., Jul 28, 2008
    #2
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  3. Hi
    Windows reads the Encryption capacity form the Wireless card Drivers.
    So what ever is reported is the capacity of the Wireless Cards and it
    supported by the OS.
    In general.
    From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    No Security
    MAC______(Band Aid if nothing else is available).
    WEP64____(Easy, to "Break" by knowledgeable people).
    WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Break).
    WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).
    Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.
    Note 2: If you use WinXP and did not updated it you would have to download
    the WPA2 patch from Microsoft. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357
    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.
    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.
    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.
    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.
    Setting Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    The Core differences between WEP, WPA, and WPA2 -
    http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My laptop uses XP SP3 and has a built in wireless adapter. The laptop docs
    > are long gone.
    >
    > I know the adapter handles WPA-PSK well because I've used it for years.
    > Other than trial and error (I hate to mess up the presently working
    > network), is there a way to determine if it can also handle WPA-AES (which
    > my router can)?
    >
    > When I go to the laptop's "Network Connections", it is listed as a
    > "Intel (R) PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network"
    >
    > When I click on my connected home wlan "properties", it shows all options
    > available including:
    > WPA-PSK, WPA2, WPA2-PSK as well as encryption by either TKIP and AES.
    >
    > Does that mean the adapter has those capabilities or are these just the
    > capabilities of the Windows XP OS?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Jeff
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Jul 29, 2008
    #3
  4. smlunatick Guest

    On Jul 28, 12:49 pm, "" <>
    wrote:
    > My laptop uses XP SP3 and has a built in wireless adapter. The laptop docs
    > are long gone.
    >
    > I know the adapter handles WPA-PSK well because I've used it for years.
    > Other than trial and error (I hate to mess up the presently working
    > network), is there a way to determine if it can also handle WPA-AES (which
    > my router can)?
    >
    > When I go to the laptop's "Network Connections", it is listed as a
    > "Intel (R) PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network"
    >
    > When I click on my connected home wlan "properties", it shows all options
    > available including:
    > WPA-PSK, WPA2, WPA2-PSK as well as encryption by either TKIP and AES.
    >
    > Does that mean the adapter has those capabilities or are these just the
    > capabilities of the Windows XP OS?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Jeff


    If WPA2 is listed, then the installed drivers should support all
    "listed" wireless security.
     
    smlunatick, Jul 31, 2008
    #4
  5. Guest Guest

    smlunatick wrote:
    > On Jul 28, 12:49 pm, "" <>
    > wrote:
    >> My laptop uses XP SP3 and has a built in wireless adapter. The
    >> laptop docs are long gone.
    >>
    >> I know the adapter handles WPA-PSK well because I've used it for
    >> years. Other than trial and error (I hate to mess up the presently
    >> working network), is there a way to determine if it can also handle
    >> WPA-AES (which my router can)?
    >>
    >> When I go to the laptop's "Network Connections", it is listed as a
    >> "Intel (R) PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network"
    >>
    >> When I click on my connected home wlan "properties", it shows all
    >> options available including:
    >> WPA-PSK, WPA2, WPA2-PSK as well as encryption by either TKIP and AES.
    >>
    >> Does that mean the adapter has those capabilities or are these just
    >> the capabilities of the Windows XP OS?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> Jeff

    >
    > If WPA2 is listed, then the installed drivers should support all
    > "listed" wireless security.


    Thank you.
     
    Guest, Aug 1, 2008
    #5
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